Database Design and Development

Database Security, Secerno Solutions {6}

by Palek S

Database Security (IT’s biggest problem)

            The author of this article, a security guru and managing director of UK company NGS David Litchfield, discusses database security and IT’s biggest problem by referencing the Black Hat conference where he exposed over 20 vulnerabilities in IBMs Informix database products. In this presentation I will discuss the top two most prevalent areas of weaknesses in database and new technology introduced as Secerno to supplement data security offerings and protect against hackers and data breaches. read more...

Compromised Data Quality by Malware {Comments Off on Compromised Data Quality by Malware}

by Eric C
In an article from PCWorld entitled “Symantec warns of malware targeting SQL databases,” there has been a spread of malware infecting SQL databases around the world. Although not a serious threat, it could pose to destroy data quality within the database. Originally targeted to Iran, the malware called W32.Narilam, looks for Microsoft SQL databases on the infected server. If Microsoft SQL is found, the malware then finds specific keywords from a file, such as account and financial bond, and then replaces those keywords with random characters. Database administrators who do not make frequent backups of the database will have corrupted data and the loss of data integrity, which could prove disastrous for customers’ data, especially in a banking database. read more...

SQL, Easier in the Future {Comments Off on SQL, Easier in the Future}

by Shigom H
Depending on the task, writing SQL queries can get complicated, in the article “Interactive SQL Query Suggestion: Making Databases User-Friendly”  Ju Fan proposes a neat tool for making SQL easier. By simply inserting keywords the tool will generate the corresponding SQL statements. This is similar to Microsoft excel, those who are unfamiliar with excel can type in keywords and excel will find the corresponding formula. SQLSUGG  is a program that suggest queries while the user types. Many databases already offer this type of  functionality but SQLSUGG differentiates itself by its ability to suggest advance queries. Unfortunately most database systems that offer this keyword functionality generate SQL queries from simple keywords that are only beneficial to “casual users”  but deemed useless to database administrators and SQL programmers. read more...

How to become an Oracle DBA {3}

by Kevin S
Last week I read and wrote about an article describing what a DBA’s job consists of, and the question arose of how a person might go about becoming a DBA. This week I read the article “How to become an Oracle DBA” by Burleson Consulting. The author starts off by listing the very generous salaries of DBA’s, which often start at around $100k/year and can reach up to $250k/year. While this is appealing, that salary doesn’t come easy. The author talks about the complex and specialized set of skills which are required. The main 3 points he brings up are outstanding communication, business degree, and of course DBA skills. The author also suggests taking courses such as Operations Research and getting Oracle certifications(however he later states in a comment on the article that certifications don’t mean much anymore). read more...

MySQL: A threat to bigwigs? {1}

by Asim K
David Kirkpatrick, of Fortune.com and contributor to CNN Technology, writes in his article, “MySQL: A threat to bigwigs?” that MySQL is the rising Linux of backend systems. He begins by explaining the structure of MySQL (which is based on the SQL language) and the structure of general open source software. Because MySQL is open source, it has a lot more potential to grow when placed next to the pace and speed that commercial software is growing because of the huge “fan base” of developers that open source attracts. The catch: not only are these “fan” developers users of MySql, but they are required, by MySQL’s ethical policy, to share any changes they may have made to the code to the MySQL database – which is in the end a win-win situation for both developer, end user, and MySQL as a public service. As Kirkpatrick points out in a citation of a quote made by MySQL CEO Scott McNealy, huge companies like Yahoo and Google depend on MySQL to get their work done – and if they can do it, so can smaller companies. Compared to a $395 per year for a server, compared to Oracle’s $20,000, MySQL is a no brainer. Kirkpatrick ends by stating that although there are still shortcomings in the free opensource software, MySQL has a huge future ahead of it, as confided in the confident words of it’s CEO, Scott McNealy in saying, “People ask me ‘What’s wrong-why are you leaving money on the table?’ We say ‘You should ask the other database companies what is wrong with their cost structure.” read more...

vulnerabilities, which one we should prioritize ? {1}

by Tseng H. K.
The journal I read this week is called “Measuring and ranking attacks based on vulnerability analysis” by Ju An and Guo, Minzhe. This journal talks about that since software vulnerabilities increases, and two or more vulnerabilities may have in same software, the journal helps to which vulnerability prioritize first, so the software have better defense. The paper measures, categorize, and provide metrics based on vulnerability analysis so let developers to perform better security on their software. read more...

Dimensions of Data Quality {1}

by Kathy S
The author of this article starts off by introducing the idea of “dimensions”, such as accuracy, consistency and timeliness and asks if these “dimensions” actually exists as intelligible concepts?  The author believes a strong case can be made that we are not thinking as clearly as we can be in this area, and that there is room for improvement. He then asks where does the term “dimension” come from when talking about data quality? In context of data quality, dimension is used as an analogy. The term gives the impression that data quality is as concrete as a solid object and that the dimensions of data quality can be measured. In data quality, the term dimension could be used interchangeably with criterion, a standard of judgment. Since data is immaterial, stating that the dimensions can be measured is an astonishing claim. The author then asks, are the dimensions credible? The more “duplication” there is in a list alongside “completeness” and “consistency”, the lower data quality likely it is, while the more completeness there is the higher data quality is. Therefore, the inclusion of “duplication” in a list of dimensions of data quality immediately creates lack of consistency in the list. A much more serious problem is that there seems to be no common agreement on what the dimensions of data quality actually are. Lastly, the author asks, are the dimensions over-abstractions? A worry is that each dimension is not a single concept, but is either a collection of disparate concepts or a generalization. read more...

The Emerging Data Economy {2}

by Allen D
I chose the article, “Data Markets: The Emerging Data Economy”, by Gil Elbaz because I found it interesting for him to talk about the emerging economy relative to massively increasing data and how this impacts our market. As of today, companies such as Salesforce.com, InfoChimps.com and DataMarket.com are selling data for money. The data market is one the rise with many large and small companies moving in. Although some people find this predicament to be a breach of privacy and security, companies with big data try to mitigate this negative perception by outsourcing their data to a third party that specializes in creating value from their existing data. As a result of this trend, new data markets and economies continue to rise; thus, price of data become more affordable to these people. One such example includes a company called Kaggle. They are basically a group of data scientists who compete with one another while analyzing outsourced data from companies, government and researchers. Their job is to study the data that was given to them by these entities and come up with solutions to their problems. Before devising a solution, they must have the ability to forecast predictions using these data sets from their vendors. These problems range from economics, governmental and sociological. read more...

Intelligent Decision Making Based on Data Mining using Differential Evolution Algorithms and Framework for ETL Workflow Management {Comments Off on Intelligent Decision Making Based on Data Mining using Differential Evolution Algorithms and Framework for ETL Workflow Management}

by Jungh K
For this week’s blog assignment, I chose an article, titled “Intelligence Decision Making Based on Data Mining using Differential Evolution Algorithms and Framework for ETL Workflow Management”.   The authors propose an integrated DSS, which utilizes a data mining technique and a framework for effective ETL workflows.  The specific data mining technique proposed the authors is to add a specialized component, known as the Artificial Intelligence Component (AIC), to business intelligence system.  The AIC utilizes Differential Evolution Algorithms, which replace an option for the current situation to an optimized option, if one exists.  Through this procedure, the authors argue that the DEA will adapt itself to improve the intelligence decision making process with the passages of time.  On top of the data mining discussed in the article, the authors propose to add two layers, application and workflow scheduling, to workflow management.  The application layer receives ETL jobs directly from the data generator.  The authors state that they are numbers of considerations, which must be taken into, for ETL processes.  The considerations include source availability, target availability, priority, job duration, upper bound, required resources, and prerequisite jobs.  The workflow management layer is divided into two parts:  workflow scheduling and workflow execution.  By incorporating the aforementioned considerations for ETL processes, workflow scheduling layer utilizes various algorithms to optimize scheduling.  The work execution layer tracks different ETL jobs and distributes throughout available servers. read more...

Happy B-day SMS {3}

by Claudia J
Today being the last blog, I decided to write about an interesting article written by John Biggs which talked about the history of the SMS. The article was called “Happy Birthday SMS” which caught my attention right away. This article discussed how a programmer from the United Kingdom in December 3rd from 1992 sent by the very first time a few lines of messages saying “Merry Christmas” from his computer to his friend’s phone. He sent his messages through the “new” technique known as short messaging service (SMS). However, this new way of communication didn’t become so popular and into effect until sever years after. Today there are about eight trillion messages crossing the air yearly where only adults between 18 to 25 years old send about 133 messages a week. read more...