Enterprise Architectures

Syncing Mobile Devices with Databases {2}

The article I read was entitled “A Database Synchronization Algorithm for Mobile Devices” by Mi-Young Choi, Eun-Ae Cho, Dae-Ha Park, Chang-Joo Moon and Doo-Kwon Baik. This article talks about the synchronization problems that occur when trying to synch mobile devices to a database. Right now mobile devices create a small sized local copy of the database so that the user can do some work while disconnected. This is done also because having constant access to the network using a lot of power and bandwidth. The authors proposed solution is to have an algorithm that works around this and is known as Synchronization Algorithms based on Message Digest or SAMD. Essentially, this algorithm looks at tables of data and compares the mobile copy of the information to a server copy. If the data is different a synch will initiate.

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Clinical Algorithms Can Be Automatically Generated {1}

My article is about clinical algorithms using SDA (state decision action) model. Basically the article describes a database of information that will be beneficial to the medical staff. The algorithms that will be “automatically” created will be based on patient’s past health care records and tying it into the correct terminology when examined. This will also show the information necessary that can be used as a graphical representation of health care procedures to be executed in health care organizations. The article also added that this methodology can be used as a tool to study how procedures related to the standards in the industry.

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Hosted Database Called ‘Storage’ by SimpleGeo {1}

This article talks about the upcoming services and products from SimpleGeo. SimpleGeo is a company that originally wanted to create location-based games, but they found out that the tools they needed did not exist yet, so this sparked an idea to go into a different direction. That direction lead them to the development of two products, Places and Context. Places is a database consisting of points of interest, and Context allows developers to query for data relevant to a given location. So now they have Storage, which is a hosted database. Developers can use this to retrieve data that has location information associated with it. Storage is hosted, so there can be outsourcing for infrastructure issues. SimpleGeo charges by the usage which is 25 cents per 1000 data calls and 10 cents per 1000 records stored. It also uses a tree structure for managing the data. This results in more efficient queries to be made. There are high hopes for Storage, hoping it will be able to become a definitive solution for managing location data.

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CISPA and Privacy {1}

In an article found in Computerworld.com, it talks about how the CISPA (Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) Bill raises concerns about privacy and how the data will be harnessed and used. The purpose of the bill is to ” make it easier for Internet Service Provides and Internet companies to collect and share cyber threat information gleaned from their networks with federal agencies like the U.S National Security Agency” (Vijayan, 2012). Privacy advocates and civil rights group disagree with the bill. The bill has been passed in the House of Representatives and is moving on to the Senate. Some of the reason why groups oppose is because “it would undermine fundamental privacy protections granted to Internet users under multiple statutes, including the Federal Wiretap Act and the Electronic Communications Privacy” (Vijayan, 2012). Those who are for the bill include high tech companies who want improved cyber security to keep hackers at bay. They say that the bill is vaguely worded and would pose a bigger problem since it would allow internet providers and internet companies and share a lot of different data with the government whose federal agencies will have access to this data. Late amendments have been added to the bill but even with those amendments it still makes the bill very dangerous concerning cyber security.

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Service Oriented Architecture benefits healthcare systems {1}

Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is one of the ways to innovate a company. It is defined as a business driven IT architectural approach that supports integrating a business as linked, repeatable tasks or services. (Baltzan) SOA helps collect data basis so they all can come together into one source. The article I chose is titled “Open Source SOA Connect at Heart of Government Health Care”. The article is talking about trying to modernize health care by switching to a SOA approach. Health organizations determined to modernize will benefit from better sharing of data, but healthcare data needs to be handled in ways that ensure patient privacy. SOA efforts can help make these results. (Kriz)

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Chapter 5.2 Virtualization {Comments Off on Chapter 5.2 Virtualization}

VMware is in the process of creating a new product set which they are currently calling Project Horizon in order to beat its competitor, Citrix.  VMware plans to develop a product that will connect virtual applications and virtual desktops to desktop computers and handheld devices.  VMware is taking a different approach to its product.  It is considering the user before the hardware.  Users will be able to customize their profiles by installing their own applications and storing personal data; the data can then be accessed from any place.  Most virtual infrastructures store configurations and applications on a storage area network.  According to Fogarty (2010), “Many companies get overwhelmed with the number of golden images they save, waste time sorting and managing them, and waste storage space by keeping dozens or hundreds of golden images on file” (Forget the golden image section, para. 1).  Project Horizon wants to reduce these images by treating them as a web page.  When a user logs in, management software will be able to configure the user’s desktop environment by streaming the software online or the user can access it from a web site.

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Chapter 5, Section 5.2 Grid computing {Comments Off on Chapter 5, Section 5.2 Grid computing}

The article from Businessweek magazine talks about a still premature but cost saving technology called grid computing.  “Grids allow processing jobs to be split up and farmed out over a network to many computers so the work can be done fast on any machine that’s available”.  Companies like IBM, HP and Sun Microsystems offer computing power in an on-demand basis.  They provide computing power when their customers need it and if not needed other users will use it.  This computing power can be less expensive than the million dollar super computers used by some companies today. Sun Microsystems charges $1 dollar per processor per hour. IBM offers its utility like computing grids that includes grids from 11 IBM data centers all over the world.  Organizations like the US Tennis Association used IBM computing grids to maintain sports fans informed of every detail in every game during the US Open. Usopen.org was plugged into a powerful computer grid that could handle the surges of demand from sports fans.  This dozens of servers at IBM’s data centers behaved like one big super computer that can serve up the US Open website one minute and do banks credit analysis the next.  Other companies like DreamWorks are plugged into a 1,000 processor compute farm at HP labs to render the complicated animations of its movies after its artist go home.  Another example is Axiom corp. “It analyses customer interactions for banks, retail stores, and credit card issuers”. By using these grids companies get the computing power and resources with out having to invest in hardware.  Companies save millions of dollars and hundreds of hours of time by switching from expensive main frame computers to grids.  Axiom cut its annual expenses in half by switching from a 2 million dollar mainframe computer to a grid of cheap servers.  Computing time is also cut down in work that usually took one month to compute now it can be done in four days.  Grid technology is still immature, some security issues need to improve and some hardware and software compatibility issues resolved. The goal is to standardize the grids and be able to link the different hardware and software that is made by different companies.  The article is related to the topic of the week in chapter 5 section 2 on grid computing. It is interesting how companies are looking into more efficient and money saving ways to operate and using resources available over a grid server thousands of miles away.

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Chapter 5.2 Architecture Trends {Comments Off on Chapter 5.2 Architecture Trends}

Virtualization has become an indispensable part of server technology, and most major companies, corporations and businesses depend on a good IT department to implement a good virtualization server system to process business transactions, order supplies and materials needed for production, facilitate warehouse shipping and deliveries, and showcase product on the internet, while servicing customer and business needs. In the past, companies operated their servers using one application and one operating system per server; this was a waste, since only about 10-15% of the server space was used. These servers would take up valuable space, and become very expensive to maintain, to store properly and to upgrade. Virtualization in essence has consolidated the multiples of servers into just one server, which is segmented into individual distinctive segments, which then can operate a completely different operating system and a different application on the same server, using a virtualization hardware manager to manage the different applications, thus making efficiency as high as 70% usage. This not only saves on physical storage space, but enables easier maintenance and more room to add on new systems. Most businesses maintain some sort of data center server using virtualization.
Desktop virtualization is another new technology that IT departments are seriously looking into. Due to the multi core processors in desktop computers, a computer can work as a virtual server, enabling any computer to work on different applications from completely different operating systems. A good example of this is Apple’s “Boot Camp” on the Macintosh, which enables a user to work in both Mac and Windows XP on the same computer. According to the article, “the Challenges of Virtualization” by author Jim Metzler, the problem with many of the past desktop virtualization systems often dealt with performance issues and limitations with graphic intensive applications, like 3D and synchronization with audio/video. As a solution, the server company, Citrix has developed a new High Definition user eXperience (HDX™) technology in their new XenDesktop 4 system. Within this system, HDX MediaStream can accelerate processing of multimedia; HDX RealTime improves audio and video encoding and streaming; and HDX 3D, which optimizes 2D and 3D graphics. This new technology enables even a simple desktop to serve as a multitasking virtualization server.

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Chapter 5.2, Virtualization {Comments Off on Chapter 5.2, Virtualization}

The article that I used is titled “Dell Virtual Lab Solution Allows Students to Access Labs Anytime, Anywhere and from Any Device” from www.virtualization.net website stating that Dell has created a way to have virtual labs.  This form of virtualization does not target businesses but rather students in higher education.  This form of virtualization is great for students who are taking a large work load and have to find a way to fit lab hours into their schedule.  Virtual labs make it so that students can use their own personal computers, and have “round-the-clock virtual access to lab IT resources and specialty applications”.  Through virtual labs there is not only a benefit to the students but also to the university as a whole.  This technology will lower costs and increase energy savings and lower the burned on IT maintenance.

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Chapter 5 Section 2, Virtualization {Comments Off on Chapter 5 Section 2, Virtualization}

My article which is titled “Red Bend Software Enters Mobile Virtualization Market with Acquisition of VirtualLogix,” is about the upcoming growth of mobile virtualization. Red Band Software, the market leader in mobile software management is taking over VirtualLogix who is a leading provider of Real-Time Virtualization technology for mobile devices.  The Mobile industry is one of the top industries and it is growing at a fast rate.  Everyone who owns a cell phone knows what it is like to want the newest software and devices that are out there.  These types of things do not come cheap. Red Band sees the challenges of the demand for smarter, richer, and faster devices while bringing affordable, exciting mobile services to enterprises and consumers. They have figured out a way to meet this challenge by combining their mobile management products with VirtualLogix mobile virtualization software. This will enable each person through mobile virtualization who owns a mobile device to securely and independently manage their different software resources on their mobile devices.  In all mobile virtualization will create cost reduction, better functionality, and security for mobile devices.  Although mobile virtualization is still in its early stages for the company, Red Band’s CEO explains, that “Red Band has trusted customer relationships, technical experience, operations infrastructure and proven execution abilities to take mobile virtualization to the next level,” (Marketwire)

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