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WhatsApp. Inc {13}

Whatsapp Messenger is a instant messaging service for smartphones. It has a monthly subscription fee of one dollar per year, with the first year being free. Tt allows people to send texts, images, video, and audio messages as well as their locations using integrated mapping features. This software is available on the Google Android, BlackBerry OS, Apple IOS, Nokia Series, Symbian, Microsoft Windows Phone, and Blackberry 10.

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Google Glass, Tomorrow’s Technology Today {17}

There are so many different technologies that are being developed in the modern world. We live in an age of technology. In our lifetime, we have seen cellphones emerge from the big Nextel bricks and large flip phones that used to exist, to the sleek iPhones, powerful Samsung S4s and powerful HTC Ones of today. There are so many incredible innovations being made to the world of technology, and all of these are developed using familiar processes that we have studied in CIS 311. The prototyping development method is especially useful in creating the technology of tomorrow. I chose one, in particular, to speak about today, and that is Google’s new Google Glass.

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Database Breach {10}

Database Breaches: Target

As technology grows at an ever faster rate, people scramble to keep up with the new changes. New systems are released; new patches, new servers, and more and more new technologies are being developed such as the cloud. Computer infrastructures such as the Google’s data bases or Sony’s Playstation Network have the challenge to maintain which is very hard on a large scale and expensive to keep up to date. With the quickly changing environment of technology, it is only becoming more difficult to stay up to date as time progresses into the future of new unknown technology advances.

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Pandas and Penguins: Google SEO algorithms. {4}

Google is a now irrevocably integral part of many of our lives. The company has spent many years by now building its many, varied, and mostly free products all centered around a basic principle of bringing the right content to the user faster, including their primary source of revenue, which is carefully, almost artfully coordinated relevant advertisements. Despite their many products, their name is still primarily known for one reason: internet searches. Virtually nobody these days says “let’s go research that on the internet,” but instead “Let’s Google it.” Even Ask.com, Yahoo!, and Microsoft’s somewhat recently renovated Bing haven’t made such a level of infamy that they have become a part of our everyday vocabulary. So certainly then, Google must have some very careful methods to their search engine technology. I’ll elaborate on two of these: Google Panda, and Google Penguin.
Google Panda and Google Penguin are both optimization algorithms in Google’s search results, but they perform two very different functions. According to Google’s official blog, in a post on Panda’s launch in February of 2011, “This update is designed to reduce rankings for low-quality sites—sites which are low-value add for users, copy content from other websites or sites that are just not very useful. At the same time, it will provide better rankings for high-quality sites—sites with original content and information such as research, in-depth reports, thoughtful analysis and so on.” Similarly, yet conversely, Google’s Inside Search official blog posted this about Penguin on its launch day, April 24th 2012, Penguin is an “important algorithm change targeted at webspam. The change will decrease rankings for sites that we believe are violating Google’s existing quality guidelines.”
Google Panda, then, is essentially a rating system based on your internet search query and complicated statistics, aimed at bringing you the most relevant content based on a combination of simple keyword matching, robustness and relevance of content, and a generalized statistical model derived from data provided by thousands of ratings by human quality testers of websites based on measures of quality (design, trustworthiness, and speed) and whether or not the testers would return to the site. Panda’s algorithm is tailored to find sites that have positive answers to these questions, found also on Google’s official blog:
• Would you trust the information presented in this article?
• Is this article written by an expert or enthusiast who knows the topic well, or is it more shallow in nature?
• Does the site have duplicate, overlapping, or redundant articles on the same or similar topics with slightly different keyword variations?
• Would you be comfortable giving your credit card information to this site?
• Does this article have spelling, stylistic, or factual errors?
• Are the topics driven by genuine interests of readers of the site, or does the site generate content by attempting to guess what might rank well in search engines?
• Does the article provide original content or information, original reporting, original research, or original analysis?
• Does the page provide substantial value when compared to other pages in search results?
• How much quality control is done on content?
• Does the article describe both sides of a story?
• Is the site a recognized authority on its topic?
• Is the content mass-produced by or outsourced to a large number of creators, or spread across a large network of sites, so that individual pages or sites don’t get as much attention or care?
• Was the article edited well, or does it appear sloppy or hastily produced?
• For a health related query, would you trust information from this site?
• Would you recognize this site as an authoritative source when mentioned by name?
• Does this article provide a complete or comprehensive description of the topic?
• Does this article contain insightful analysis or interesting information that is beyond obvious?
• Is this the sort of page you’d want to bookmark, share with a friend, or recommend?
• Does this article have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content?
• Would you expect to see this article in a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book?
• Are the articles short, unsubstantial, or otherwise lacking in helpful specifics?
• Are the pages produced with great care and attention to detail vs. less attention to detail?
• Would users complain when they see pages from this site?

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Analyzing Your Website to Improve SEO Using Analytics Tools {7}

What is the point of creating a great website if the no one is able to see it? While it is important that web developers and designers focus on making great websites, it equally important that they focus on Search Engine Optimization, otherwise known as SEO. To review, SEO is a process of improving the quality of websites using a number of techniques/tools in order to achieve higher rankings with major search engines (“What is seo,”). One of the tools that help with SEO is the use of Analytics tools. In general, Analytic tools help track sites’ statistics and help measure how successful your site may or may not be (Chen, 2011). It is able to track marketing subscriptions, contact form completions, downloads, clicks to social accounts, amount of traffic, etc. (Gabe, 2012). However, When it comes to SEO, analytic tools are the most used when it comes to measuring site traffic and conversion rates (Monsen).

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Marketing with Social Media {7}

In a world of cut throat competition finding a way to reach customers can mean life or death for start-up companies.  Even well established companies must always try to find new ways to stay in the public’s consciousness. Becoming or staying relevant is a daunting task when one considers the deluge of adverts an average person experiences every day.  People become numb to them, and end up partially or completely ignoring the various commercials, billboards, and specials they come across hundreds of times each and every day.  Advertising can often feel like trying to fill a barrel of water with an eye dropper or asking someone to find your needle in the ol’ haystack.  A company can easily find itself throwing money into a black hole called marketing, with little or no results.  On the other hand a smart and efficient company can find clever and affordable ways to reach potential customers, and not only reach customers but truly grasp their attention.  One new and powerful tool to help with such a task is marketing via social media like Facebook and Twitter.

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Improving SEO Using Accessibility Techniques {3}

(Image Obtained From 2.bp.blogspot.com)

There are several ways to improve upon your Search Engine Optimization, using link building, usability techniques, and analyzing your site in order to see where you are in comparison with competitors, there is one technique however that can not only make your site easier to find, but is an important part of making sure that a broader range of the population is able to view and interact with your site. According to the 2010 census, 19% of people within the US have some type of physical, mental, or communicative disability (census.gov). Making sure a website is accessible for those with disabilities isn’t only important for making sure those 19% can use your website, it’s also a legal issue. In section 508, an amendment to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, guidelines are laid out that require websites operated by the federal government, or receiving funds or payment from a federal agency to make their technology, including websites, available to those with disabilities (section508.gov).

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Mongo DB (No SQL database for web) {6}

Today’s highly social and interactive web has created a market for a database management system with the ability to offer fast real time access over the Internet while managing massive data sets that are growing by the minute in volume and complexity. MongoDB fills this need. As I will explain later in this blog, MongoDB is not the perfect solution for every project, but for certain tasks that are within it’s niche, it is the best solution.

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Building Web Applications Using Google API {7}

Unless you live under a rock, I will guarantee that you have come across at least one web site that utilizes one of the many Google APIs. Today, it is being used almost everywhere! To fully understand Google APIs, let me first explain what an API actually is. API stands for “Application Programmable Interface” and is a set of programming instructions that access web based software or tools (Dave). In this case, the Google API allow web developers to query Google’s servers, using its data for their own web applications. Google alone has dozens of APIs open to web developers and designers. Some of these APIs include: Maps API, Analytics API, Places API, Calendar APIs, YouTube APIs, etc. (Chapman, 2011). Let’s explore some of the more popular Google APIs.

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Responsive Web Design {9}

Making software easy to use has been a major focal point for developers since the dawn of the microchip.  Whether or not an application or website is successful often depends on how quickly users come to familiarize themselves with an interface.  Applications that inundate users with too many buttons or options often struggle to find a wide user base. Similarly, websites that are ‘clunky’ or difficult to navigate are often left in the dust.  Even sites with solid accessibility but that are visually unappealing will find themselves with a timid following. These two issues have historically been major pains for programmers and developers who are trying to add mobile functionality to their software.  Now with the advent of CSS 3 modules, it is easier than ever for developers to provide media rich content that is customized for any type of mobile device; tablet smart phone or otherwise.

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