HP’s Dabble in the Data Warehousing Business

by Kevin Q
 

Former HP President Mark HurdWhen Mark Hurd became Hewlett-Packard’s President in 2005, he noticed that as a technology company, they were failing in one area internally. They had no central system that collected all their companies data together into what Mr. Hurd liked to call “a single version of the truth.”(Vance 2008) Mark Hurd used to head the teradata division at NCR, where he helped start data warehousing, however now he notice that HP needed some kind of similar system to help itself. After explaining some benefits of data warehousing like noticing trends during certain times of the year and other analysis that can be noticed once data is all collectively pulled together, HP created NeoView internally. NeoView is a data warehouse and business intelligence computer server that would solve and help with HP and Mark Hurds needs. It became available for purchse to the public, now a competitor in the data warehousing market which was dominated by much larger companies like Teradata, IBM, Oracle and Microsoft. HPs sales weren’t impressive, which may have been results of building its systems on expensive older technology, reather than cheaper and newer technology, according to expertes in the field. The NeoView can cost more than 10 million for the whole setup, which is kind of pricey, especially when competitors are using cheaper setups and therefore reducing price to customers. Their entrance into the data warehousing came at a time where companies were beginning to see the importance and advantage of data warehouses, but their approach seems to be a little off.

This relates to class, because this week we are supposed to begin going over data warehouses. I looked up NeoView and found that it was officially discontinued last year in January.I also found out that Mark Hurd no longer works at HP, as he resigned in 2010. It’s a shame it didn’t gain enough traction to keep up with the larger companies, but with the way HP handled their system from the get go, people seemed unsure. Although their time in the data warehousing market was ended, HP has opened companies eyes to the advantages of owning a data warehouse.

Source: Vance, Ashlee. (2008, December). A Page from an Old Playbook. New York Times Technology. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/29/technology/29hewlett.html

2 thoughts on “HP’s Dabble in the Data Warehousing Business”

  1. I find it interesting when companies branch out into new business areas. Sometimes, it really seems like a stretch. I mean, if a big company like HP goes into a new territory and most people haven't heard about it, it probably was not too successful.

  2. I think it because they have a poor marketing team that made NeoView a failed business venture. I have never even heard about NeoView till now, plus that steep price of 10 million would cause most people to be hesitant in sign up.

Comments are closed.