New Way of Thinking

by Monica G
With computer hacking on the rise, it’s no wonder people are looking at other ways to avoid these inconveniences. The author explains this new way of approaching password guessing attacks from unauthorized users; it is called PGRP (Password Guessing Resistance Protocol). With past ways, the ATT-based login protocols allowed for very few user free attempts without requiring more information and others fell on the other side of the spectrum where user convenience was all and ATTs where low but required other fields. Fortunately there is some type of middle ground, PGRP which allows the user to have a lot of password attempts without pestering with ATTs but it sometimes only works for users trying to enter from the same device. Because many times that is the problem, invaders will come from random places when the attacks occur, and when this does occur, PGRP usually only allows the user one attempt at most.

This can relate to the class to the data security behind it. All of our information is stored in databases. It has become an issue to protect this information while still keeping it user friendly. The right categorization of a database allows for better security measures because it tells the designers which information is more important.

This is an interesting reading because security has been a hot topic for a long time and its good to know people are trying to figure out different ways of approaching it; new, more innovative ways. My only problem would be seeing how it would actually do in action. The few runs the protocol has had have been only trials and many times what performs well in trials may not succeed in real life.

Citation: Mansour Alsaleh, M. M. (2012, January). Revisiting Defenses against Large-Scale. Retrieved November 27, 2011, from ABI/INFORM Complete: http://0-search.proquest.com.opac.library.csupomona.edu/abicomplete/docview/903467756/fulltextPDF?accountid=10357

Side Task:

  1. This blog post took about 300 minutes.
  2. I read 5 blog posts by my classmates this week.
  3. The comments took 15 minutes.