Oracle’s superior database{Comments Off on Oracle’s superior database}


by Abubaker D
So my article is about Oracle’s excellent database performance. Apparently, Oracle has set a new world record for database performance, the company’s SPARC Supercluster enterprise computing system has stepped over the previous world’s holder, IBMs Power 780 server. Next they go on about describing the database’s results, and they were just amazing. The results were done by testing 1728 core configuration that spit out around 30.2 million database transactions per minute. And in comparison with IBM Power 780, that’s three the amount of transactions. Oracle also achieved the results on a system that has 13 terabytes of memory and 1.7 petabytes of storage for a price to performance ratio of $1.01 per transaction, per minute. And the article also says that it’s $0.37 cheaper than IBM’s second place system. Oracle was saying that it’s not sure if anyone will order the configuration because it’s too big for any company to hold. The article also describes how HP’s system is so vulnerable to Oracles system and that Oracle’s system is 6 times the speed of HP’s.  And it was just boasting about good Oracle products are in comparison with HP’s. 

I thought it was related to our class because Oracle is a database system. And I think students would be interested in knowing the actual number of results for database performance. Just to for the note, these results are just synthetic benchmarks. Meaning it wasn’t tested on a given piece of hardware in the real world setting.

I was interested in this article because it was about Oracle’s system, and I happen to be a fan of them. It’s interesting to know that they blew away IBM’s system by way more. I mean it’s 3 times better. I thought it was helpful for everyone to know about this, just to see how well big companies are doing in the tech field. It’s nice to keep ourselves updates with what’s going on in the real world.

David Murphy (2010). Now Oracle System Breaks Database Performance Record. Retrieved from http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2373869,00.asp