Using ER Models for RFID

by Penny P
In this article, the author talks about how RFIDs (Radio Frequency Identification) uses Entity-Relation models to manage its data. With the use of RFIDs, it allows objects to automatically collect information so it makes things easier and more efficient for those who use it. The data for the RFIDs changes frequently and it requires the use a data model so that it can perform certain functions such as tracking and monitoring information. The ER Models allow the RFIDs to collect and obtain data that they can use for tracking and identifying the history and real time information. There are several ways to use the ER Models for the RFIDs. One way is to model the data as events. In the article, it mentions that the RFIDs used by Sun Java System models the static entity types into three different tables: one for the entity type, the second for specific attributes of the entity, and the third for the parent/child relationships. The dynamic data is stored in a different log where they are always associated with timestamps. Another use of the ER Model is though DRER (Dynamic Relationship ER Model). This an extension of the regular ER Model that adds a dynamic relationship. The addition of dynamic relationships can generate events and generate state history.

This article was insightful because it shows how ER Models can be used in the real world. Not only can they map out static events, but with the use of the DRER, it can map out data that can change constantly. I thought it was interesting to see how people can extend the ER Model beyond its static relationship and incorporate the dynamic.

 

Reference:

Bai, K., Li, S., Tian, J. (2011). Communication Software and Networks (ICCSN). (September 2011) P. 482-488. Retrieved from http://0-ieeexplore.ieee.org.opac.library.csupomona.edu/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=6014315.

8 thoughts on “Using ER Models for RFID”

  1. Good article. I really thought that er model was exactly just a model but this article proved my thinking was wrong and that it can be used in a variety of situations.

  2. This is great article. I didn’t know that Radio Frequency Identification is very useful in data model. Thank you for posting this article.

  3. Color me intrigued…..this is quite an interesting relationship. As the posters before me have acknowledged, taking a data management technique such as ER-modeling out of context can prove to be quite the utility. RFID was an already steady system for inventories – pairing it with the structure of and ERD such as the one mentioned could easily amplify it’s output capabilities (mainly, more room to manage).

    Very cool. Cheers!

  4. That is really cool to see ER Models being used in the real world like this. This just further confirms how so much data out there in the world that can be managed using databases. Its amazing how something so simple as ER modeling can have an impact in the way data is managed. Great article!

  5. Your article was informative as I am very familiar with RFIDs but never bothered to think about how the information was managed. Let us just hope that the data management that the RFIDs implore are secured as RFIDs freely pass the information through the air. It will be interesting to see how RFIDs will grow in use and importance and the new security threats they will undoubtedly create.

  6. This article is very informative because I did not know Radio Frequency Identification could be related to ER Model.

  7. This is an actual very interesting article because it’s also correlated to the QRC scans for smart phones. All you need to do is scan the QRC code and then it will go to a database and find what ever you’re searching for. The idea to keep the history with the dynamic is actual pretty smart on the developers of Sun Microsystems. Great Article.

  8. Color me intrigued…..this is quite an interesting relationship. As the posters before me have acknowledged, taking a data management technique such as ER-modeling out of context can prove to be quite the utility. RFID was an already steady system for inventories – pairing it with the structure of and ERD such as the one mentioned could easily amplify it’s output capabilities (mainly, more room to manage).

    Very cool. Cheers!

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