Access

Help with SQL :) {2}

by Abel R
My article is called Easing into SQL and it talks about how tedious writing code can be. The article mentions common mistakes such as logic errors and typos and it also mentions how you can create most basic statements in the query design grid using Microsoft Access. When using Access you can produce an equivalent SQL statement for every query, and you can use this to your advantage. You can click the View button and choose SQL View and Access will display the query’s equivalent SQL statement. This can be very useful if you;re having trouble with SQL statements and don’t feel like producing it from scratch. read more...

Migrating from Access to a High-End DBMS {2}

by Jonathan N
This article talks about the users which are ready to make the next step forward and advance from the simplicity of Microsoft Access to a much more multifaceted Microsoft SQL server.  The author speaks of the many reasons why you should be willing to migrate your shared access database to a client/ server.  Access is less able to manage file sharing efficiently. When network traffic increases, access’s responsiveness decreases.  The author also states that Access can handle databases only up to 2 GB and has only  a few high availability features. This could be a big reason why companies will look for other solutions, veering away from Access. 2GB of information is very minimal for some organizations database. Microsoft Access does not backup and restore files dynamically while the database is in use.  This makes using a client/ server for your database much beneficial  because the desire for better security and a dynamic web back end makes it much worth it to go in the route to a SQL server. If you believe you need to make the approach t Sybase Adapative Server Enterprise, you should allow the phased implementations. You should follow these that are listed in Matthew Sarrel’s guidelines below to make the migration easier. read more...

Easing Into SQL {Comments Off on Easing Into SQL}

by Jonathan N
This Article talks about how difficult of a task it might be to master SQL. In the article they show us how to use the query design grid to create SQL statements and then how to run the statements in the immediate window to debug them. First the author, Susan Harkins speaks about building a SQL statement in the query design grid.  We as users are very likely to create errors and typos, so Susan recommends us to let Access do most of the work for us. Access produces an equivalent SQL  statement for every query. To begin, You first need to build a query like any normal query by clicking create query in the toolbar. You then need to drag fields from the field list to the grid, build relationships, add criteria. Once you have completed the queries you can now click the view button and choose SQL view and Access will display the query equivalent SQL statement. Then you can highlight the statement and copy it to a module.  Now Susan wrote about how we can Debug a SQL Statement in the Query Design Grid. Chances are statements won’t run correctly the first time after making changes from  the design grid to a module. There is a short list available in the link below that will help pinpoint the problem. After completing the tasks, you can run the statement by clicking the Run button on the toolbar. read more...

When should you use Microsoft SQL Server over Microsoft Access {2}

by Toan T
The article talks about the benefits on when one should choose to use Microsoft SQL Server over Microsoft Access. Microsoft Access is one of the few tools that many businesses use for their database needs. Its intuitive GUI and unique features have made it very easy for people to setup any database and have it running with very little time and efforts. Unfortunately, many large corporations tend to steer away from using Microsoft Access because Access does not have any high level security feature  which makes it very unreliable and hazardous when it come with dealing with sensitive data such as social security numbers, home addresses, etc. This is when SQL server is more preferred because it does exactly what Access can do whist providing many more useful features such as automatic incremental backups, secure data using Windows Active Directory Security System, databases cannot be easily duplicated and so forth. In addition, SQL Server can handle terrabytes worth of data where Access can only handle around 1 gigabyte. Even with the numerous limitations that Access has, it can still be used together with SQL Server One can simply using Access to build a user friendly front end for the database while having all the data be securely stored within SQL Server. read more...