Amazon

Amazon Drone: Revolutionary Delivery System {12}

Humble Beginnings
Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, Inc. worked in investment banking before he would create the conglomerate company known worldwide in 1994 by starting out as an online bookstore. Bezos’ reasoning for creating an online store was the “2,300 percent annual growth in web usage” (Price III, 2013) that was experienced during this time. With Amazon, Inc. being a pure online store with a wide database, it allowed the company to house numerous amounts of books without the limitations of on location bookstores.
When Jeff Bezos hired new employees, he emphasized on customer service as being the number one trait and priority for his new recruits. He would also have humble desks for his workers to use which would be “made of doors and 2x4s” (Price III, 2013) not only because they were least costly but to show the work environment that Bezos hoped to create. Within the next few years, Amazon, Inc. would become millionaire company and within the later years in the billions.
The Amazon Drone
The idea of the drone is to deliver packages in thirty minutes for faster satisfaction from customers and to hopefully pave a way for a normal form of deliveries for other companies in the near future. A viral video of this drone, a.k.a. the Octocopter, has circulated over the web showing the process of how the delivery process would work. In the video, an Amazon warehouse worker puts a single item into a small, plastic yellow tub. The box then travels on a conveyor belt, which stops under a Prime Air Octocopter. The Octocopter grabs the package and takes off outside the warehouse doors. It continues to fly over fields, urban areas, and finally reaches its destination dropping the package off at the front of the door. Bezos says that these drones will only be able to carry up to 5 pounds which accounts for “86 percent of the items Amazon currently delivers” (Maisto, 2013). Amazon continues to work with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on rules for unmanned aerial vehicles to be permitted in the urban skies (Maisto, 2013). By 2015, Amazon anticipates to begin implementing the Octocopters in their Prime deliveries with the hope that the FAA’s rules will be in action by that time.
Complications
An expert on unmanned aerial vehicles named Dr. Darren Ansell brought up a few challenges that Amazon will face with its drone debut. Ansell talks about the Octocopter’s awareness saying that “The UAVs do not currently have the awareness of their environment to be able to avoid flying into people… to deliver goods to people’s home for example in residential areas, the UAVs must overfly densely populated towns and cities, something that today’s regulations prevent” (Maisto, 2013). Ansell also talks about the security issues suggesting that since the drones are unguarded that they are vulnerable to theft as well as with the package.
Some people are also concerned that with the implementation of the drone, the postal service will only have the task of returning unwanted packages. Amazon, however, have had talks with the United States Postal Service to reserve Sunday as a shipping day for them (Rash, 2013). This idea is already in effect in the New York and Los Angeles area and in time will apply nationwide.
Conclusion
The Amazon drone will revolutionize the delivery system we know today by enacting a faster way to receive packages. As with every new process, there are some issues to overcome, as well as some barriers to deal with. However, Amazon, Inc. has already started on ways to work with government organizations to overcome some of these obstacles by working with already placed laws on air travel. The Amazon drone is something of a work of fiction that will be seen by all in the near future.

read more...

HTML 5 Geolocation {12}

HTML 5 Geolocation

            Need help finding a restaurant? What if someone is lost and they need to get their bearings straight? Getting lost is never fun, but with Geolocation convenience is literally at the palm of their hands. With some simple swipes on a smartphone, a user may never get lost ever again, provided that worst case scenarios such as losing their phone or having poor connections doesn’t happen of course. In this blog, I will explain what Geolocation is, the benefits of using Geolocation, how it can help businesses, and what businesses use Geolocation; I will also discuss some concerns associated with the software.

read more...

Amazon’s Redshift {1}

Cloud-based hosted data warehousing services are gaining in popularity. The primary drivers for this movement are that older enterprise warehouse data systems are expensive and difficult to maintain. Amazon looks to fill those void’s with its new hosted data warehouse service Redshift. What makes it unique is that it’s about a tenth of the cost of regular data warehouses and it automates deployment and maintenance. It is also compatible with many popular business intelligence tools, so people will not have to spend resources to learn new tools. Since Redshift runs off of Amazon’s AWS service, it gets the added benefits of massive failover and redundancy clusters. Customers will not have to worry about data management as it’s already taken care of by Amazon.

read more...

Old Fashion SQL {4}

The article I chose to blog about this week was “Google App Engine Goes Old School With SQL Database” written by Caleb Garling of Wired.com. This article speaks about the addition of a SQL database to their Google App Engine. The Google App Engine is a means for Google customers to build and host applications on top of Google’s online infrastructure. Prior to this, Google was in the forefront of the NoSQL movement, but with this announcement, it shows that good old fashion SQL is alive and well. Google provides this SQL database so people can power their App Engine applications with a relational database, which will be more familiar to the masses, in a “fully managed cloud environment”(Garling, 2011).  Google is totally headed in the opposite direction of competitor Oracle which announced their Big Data Appliance (NoSQL database).

read more...

A brief background on NoSQL and Relational Databases {2}

The article that I chose to blog about this week is “Amazon goes back to the future with ‘NoSQL’ Database” by Caleb Garling. The article starts by saying that Amazon was one of the first companies to back the NoSQL movement. It says that NoSQL was started as a way to improve storage of unstructured data. They talk about Amazon’s web services and database offerings such as DynamoDB. The article states that “NoSQL databases are a response to traditional relational database such as Oracle and MySQL. (Garling, 2012)” It then goes on to talk about how relational databases are setup. They say that “relational databases store information in neat rows and columns, typically, on a single server.  NoSQL databases are designed to store data across a wide array of machines. (Garling, 2012)”  The authors then go on to talk about how there have been a number of open source NoSQL projects to take shape in the success of projects such as DynamoDB. The article even talks about Oracle releasing their own version of a NoSQL database. They go on to talk about how Amazon has built their NoSQL database and how they have made it scale up or down as required by their customers. However, the article ends by saying that “NoSQL isn’t for everyone.” It talks very briefly about some downsides such as skill requirements or having to rely on another company to provide the database service for you.

read more...

SkySQL’s New Database Tool {2}

The article talks about how a company named SkySQL released a configuration tool that deploys databases to a cloud environment.  SkySQL offers its services to database administrators that lack the technical skills to transfer databases to a cloud environment.  The new company will offer its services on Amazon Web Services(AWS).  Through this new configuration, it allows its users to manage instances, isolate and reconfigure individual nodes, and backup and restore.  The article informs the reader about the compatibility of the new service and how it is compliant with the three most used MySQL distributions.  MySQL is a growing trend that allows companies to seek the latest performance optimization technologies.  SkySQL provides a lucrative service that received funding from a number of investors that hope to see the company grow and evolve.

read more...

Amazon makes efficiency a web developer’s friend {2}

This article is exactly what it says because Amazon has given resources for web developers that make it easier for them to create their web applications for their Amazon account.  It’s called Amazon Web Services or AWS, and it allows Javascript, jQuery, ASP.NET, PHP, and Java.  The platform is called Elastic Beanstalk and uses the Windows Server 2008 R2 AMI(Amazon Machine Image).  They mention, “Elastic Beanstalk then automatically takes care of deployment details such as capacity provisioning, load balancing, auto-scaling and application health monitoring, according to the company.”  This means that everything will be taken care of, as their applications are uploaded into the Amazon cloud.

read more...

How Data Binding Works {2}

Data binding is the process that retrieves data from a given data source and associates it to attributes of the User Interface elements. Data binding gets data from the middle tier of an application and displays it in a nice looking html format. When you use data binding expressions with ASP.Net controls, behaviors are attached to the controls life cycle through the Data Binding event handlers. As developers of our web pages we have the power the trigger data binding events for individual controls or if we want to we can make it trigger all controls within the page. If you want to call for data binding you would use, <%# … %> and the data binding expression will update themselves if you do not want to call data bind, you can create a new page class that overrides the on load method. Data binding expressions can only be used with ASP.Net control markup and require you to call to the Data bind method.

read more...

Amazon Web Services Aides Developers {2}

Amazon Web Services (AWS) has recently released Elastic Beanstalk, which has been developed to assist ASP.NET developers in implementing cloud-based applications. Developers can upload their ASP.NET applications to AWS’s cloud using the AWS toolkit for Visual Studio, and Elastic Beanstalk will then automatically deploy details such as capacity provisioning, load balancing, auto-scaling and application health monitoring. In order to enable these features, developers must first install the Visual Studio toolkit, as well as sign up for an AWS account. Although there are no additional charges for using Elastic Beanstalk, enterprises still have to pay for the AWS resources needed to store data and run their applications. There are even trial versions of the toolkit available for users who are interested in acquiring the tool for development purposes.

read more...

Amazon Web Services Announces New ASP.Net Services For Developers Worldwide {Comments Off on Amazon Web Services Announces New ASP.Net Services For Developers Worldwide}

This article simply talks about what Amazon has recently announced about their implementation of a new service for Windows developers along with the launch of their new database services for Microsoft SQL Server and ASP.Net support of their proprietary cloud service known as Elastic Beanstalk. Amazon RDS purpose is to remove the complexity of deploying and managing databases and makes it much more simple and easier for developers to set up and operate relational databases by only managing administration tasks because developers can now just upload their application and Elastic Beanstalk will automatically handles the deployment operations. Elastic Beanstalk is also built upon ISS 7.5 software stack so existing ASP.Net applications can easily be deployed with very minimal changes in the code which saves time and money. Elastic Beanstalk is free for everyone which other premium features that customers can choose pay for it if they need to. It is also very easy to get started, AWS simply has it own toolkit that will work with Visual Studio or AWS Management Console.

read more...