api

Building Web Applications Using Google API {7}

by Emily L
Unless you live under a rock, I will guarantee that you have come across at least one web site that utilizes one of the many Google APIs. Today, it is being used almost everywhere! To fully understand Google APIs, let me first explain what an API actually is. API stands for “Application Programmable Interface” and is a set of programming instructions that access web based software or tools (Dave). In this case, the Google API allow web developers to query Google’s servers, using its data for their own web applications. Google alone has dozens of APIs open to web developers and designers. Some of these APIs include: Maps API, Analytics API, Places API, Calendar APIs, YouTube APIs, etc. (Chapman, 2011). Let’s explore some of the more popular Google APIs. read more...

Developing Mobile Database Apps {1}

by Kevin S
Learning about application development and databases go hand-in-hand with each other. Speaking of hands, we frequently would like to access databases through a mobile device. In the journal “Building Database-Powered Mobile Applications” we can learn of the different API’s available to create applications on mobile platforms. API’s covered include those for Android, Symbian, Windows CE/Mobile and Windows Phone (sorry Apple isn’t covered!). For most of the OS’s, SQLite may be used. SQLite has some restrictions on it’s data types and does not support certain other features normally used in SQL server. read more...

Data Prediction {3}

by Andrew H
I read an article by, Alex Williams called “Prior Knowledge: A Predictive Database for Developers.” In his article Alex talks about the company Prior Knowledge that debuted their predictive database application called Veritable on September 11th in San Francisco. The Prior Knowledge team has spent years learning the art of statistics so that they could build their knowledge into this software. As a result they were able to develop a software that allows developers to build applications that can determine what things are. One of Alex’s examples of what the company uses it for is working with retailers to determine their customers purchasing patterns. He also states, that the service “magically fills in values that may be missing.” The end result will allow data to be analyzed that other wise would not be able to. read more...

Predicting Missing Data {3}

by Kevin S
It may be difficult to translate data in databases which are missing values into useful information. In the article “Prior Knowledge: A Predictive Database For Developers”, Alex Williams discusses how the Prior Knowledge company has decided to tackle blank data. They have released a new Veritable API which, in short, looks at the stored data and intelligently predicts and fills in any blank areas. The hope is that this new technology will allow database developers deploy new applications which can predict the values of these blanks and help turn their data into useful information. read more...

Google Has Done it Again {3}

by Katheryn T
Does it really surprise anyone?  Google has always been a leader in innovations and thinking outside the box.  This time, they have discovered a way to super connect all their databases in real time.  The article I read spoke about how Google was able to create an accurate connection between world-wide servers. ” Today, there are many databases designed to store data across thousands of servers” (Metz, 2012).  What Google has done is come up with a way to have multiple data centers and millions of servers instead of just a few data centers with thousands of servers.  Essentially, they have installed atomic clocks, which keep real time on the atomic level, and GPS antennas on the actual servers.  The combinations of these two devices helps keep the servers in perfect timing. This new system is called Spanner and the two devices are part of their TrueTime API. This new method will help users in different parts of the world have a consistent view.  From the article, this isn’t a very expensive idea, but not everyone can implement. read more...

Lead the way to interoperability with APIs {1}

by Toan T
This article talks about the use of APIs and how it has become the standards in what the article would call “interoperability”. The fascinating thing about  APIs is that all business and government entities all share the same common fundamental principle in the age of what we call Web 2.0. The main problem that was prominent in the age of Web 2.0 was how data gathered can be shared through out the web in a easy and simplistic way. Back then, information can only be viewed in a visualization system. This was the only way where different data can be viewed together. However, it generally takes a lot of time to develop and was very expensive. Then a new approach to the problem was mashups, it is  “a way of collating data from multiple sources using the types of API typically seen in applications such as Google Maps and eBay. Information from different databases could be automatically married and presented to analysts and Pentagon officials in the same interface.” This method allows data to be gathered through out different networks. It is what companies such as “eBay, Amazon and Flickr all make their information available in the same way, exposing their data in machine-readable forms that are easy for other applications, or in some cases web browsers, to consume.” read more...

The battle of Flash 11 and WebGL. {Comments Off on The battle of Flash 11 and WebGL.}

by George A

Adobe recently announced in this article that they are working on Flash Player 11. As of October 6th it was released. This release will include rendering of 3D graphics which is a significant update from Flash Player 10. Also announced was Adobe Air 3. Adobe has lost some of its former foothold in the video playing area of the internet. HTML5 and Apple are both a cause. Adobe clearly isn’t trying to reclaim that space on the internet but is now attempting to compete somewhere else. The Stage 3D rendering that Adobe is using is a low level API for rendering 2D and 3D graphics. According to Adobe browsers will be able to run console quality games. Google’s WebGL now has something to compete with. Flash 11 will have 64bit capability also. read more...