CIS305

Have you been PWNed!? {Comments Off on Have you been PWNed!?}

by Stephen O
If you were affected by Lulzsec’s attack on Sony or any of the other numerous targets you may have had your information compromised. This summer there seemed to be no shortage of news of hackers and their victims, and no one seemed safe not even the government or their affiliates were safe from hacking or denial of service attacks. While people suffered and business were thoroughly embarrassed there was opportunity to be had. Recently several sites like pwnedlist.com have sprung up and have offered people a chance to check their usernames and emails against databases of known lists that Lulzsec released of compromised accounts. “Among security experts, 2011 has already been anointed “Year of the Data Breach.” Millions of people have had their email addresses, user names, passwords and more clipped by crackers breaking into the data stores of companies like Sony, Epsilon, Google, Citigroup and Sega. What’s more many more less publicized breaches occur daily. So Pwnedlist couldn’t be coming online at a better time.” (Mello jr, 2011) read more...

US should embrace the cloud! {1}

by Stephen O
Summary

Imagine in a couple years that cloud computing was twice as big as it was now. There were government standards when it came to cloud privacy and because we had embraced cloud-computing America was the clear leader in cloud computing. We could have that , if  The United States Government and the Industry would work towards spreading cloud computing. The TechAmerica Foundation makes the point if the Industry and the US Government worked together we could all benefit from. The U.S. Government needs to make the first step though.  “The U.S. government can help grow the nation’s cloud computing market by assisting private companies in the development of cloud security standards and by encouraging cloud providers to allow data portability among them, a new tech industry report recommended. The U.S. government can also “lead by example” by stepping up its use of cloud-based services and by revamping its procurement and budget processes to encourage agencies to buy cloud services” (Gross, 2011) read more...

Dropbox for Teams: Cloud Storage for Business {2}

by Daniel L
Many of us have either heard of or used Dropbox to move our files between computers and other devices.  Dropbox has grown to become a recognized internet based file hosting provider and go-to service for backing up files primarily for individual consumers.  Dropbox wants to change that by reaching out to business users as well.  There are a lot of businesses out there who have employees that like to share files and documents with their coworkers and clients, and have used the Dropbox services in the past.  To help provide more solutions for businesses, Dropbox has developed a business-oriented version of their service called Dropbox for Teams.  Typically, individuals who start a Dropbox account, have access to 2GB of storage at no cost, businesses  with a Dropbox for Teams service on the other hand, start with 1TB of storage that five users can share, with a price tag of $795 dollars a year.  It is important to note that if the users that are sharing the 1TB of space end up needing more storage, they can add as much as they need, upon Dropbox’s approval and quota.  At first, the price for the 5 user Dropbox for Teams service may sound quite expensive, but if you were to compare the individual plans with 100GB of storage at $239.88 a year, with the $159 per person price-tag of a Dropbox for Teams service with potentially unlimited storage, the Team option is the clear cut winner for business oriented cloud storage needs. read more...

Every law you break, every mouse click you make, we’ll be watching you {2}

by Stephen O
Summary:

In the Europe Union there are plans for a  new EU wide database of “alleged intellectual property infringers.” What is concerning the EU’s Data Watch dog is that these are alleged infringers and “there is no legal standing” for a database. It will collect personal data such as Names, Addresses, and other personal information in addition to the suspected infringement. The information will remain in the database for a unspecified amount of time.  At the time being there is no way that any person could verify just how legal a Database like this is. read more...

Footprint Database used catch criminals! {2}

by Stephen O
Summary:
What comes to mind when you think of databases? You would normally think about a collection of your personal information that you may or may not have given out freely. Combine that with the crime solving and what comes to mind now? Shows like NCSI and CSI and its many spinoff should be first in your thoughts. Crime solving units around the world use databases on offenders to keep track of finger prints, blood type, and DNA. However has it ever crossed your mind…that your foot print could also end up in some national database? If you are like the rest of us this has not yet crossed your mind. The United Kingdom stores the imprints of thousands of shoe types and imprints from “suspects” left at crime scenes. The database was created by The Forensic Science Service and locates matches between shoe prints and crimes, much like DNA databases work here in America. While using footprints to solve crimes is not exactly new, a database allows Scotland yard to solve those tough to solve cases faster. read more...