Cloud

NoSQL cloud technology as an option? {3}

As relational databases such as SQL and MySQL have been the standard model for storing, retrieving, and managing data throughout the IT industry for the past decades, relational databases finds itself losing its significance primarily due to fixed schema requirements and the inability to scale (Arora & Aggarwal, 2013). Three prominent trends occurring in the computer industry are Big Users, Big Data, and Cloud Computing. Relational databases finds itself struggling to keep up with these current trends. This is where NoSQL cloud technology can provide a solution to these problems.

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Amazon’s Redshift {1}

Cloud-based hosted data warehousing services are gaining in popularity. The primary drivers for this movement are that older enterprise warehouse data systems are expensive and difficult to maintain. Amazon looks to fill those void’s with its new hosted data warehouse service Redshift. What makes it unique is that it’s about a tenth of the cost of regular data warehouses and it automates deployment and maintenance. It is also compatible with many popular business intelligence tools, so people will not have to spend resources to learn new tools. Since Redshift runs off of Amazon’s AWS service, it gets the added benefits of massive failover and redundancy clusters. Customers will not have to worry about data management as it’s already taken care of by Amazon.

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First MegaUpload, now Mega {3}

As many people have heard by now, MegaUpload was seized by the FBI for copyright infringement and the clever designer behind it, Kim Dotcom, announced he will be opening up a new digital storage site simply called Mega. The main difference for Mega is the ability for users to encrypt right when anybody uploads files from their web browser. Using Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), nobody but the original uploader will be able to access the files. The decryption key is stored with the user whenever he/she needs to access their files and it was made clear Mega will not have access to these decryption keys. As a result, this will prevent any prying eyes from knowing what the contents of a user’s files are. Not only that, but Mega will store all customers’ data onto two different servers located in different countries. Each server will have the ability to have identical copies and work in real time. However, the article did not specify what kind of database technology will be used for the new servers and how the new server will work in terms of making redundant copies from across the world.

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This Week on Survivor {1}

10,000 engineers and business people gathered together on September 30, 2012 to discuss the future of a company that made extraordinary announcements for computing that brings promise of a revolutionary future for people everywhere. That company isn’t Apple. Although unknown to most, these suited men gathered to hear about Oracle’s venture into the cloud. NASA missions started the trend decades ago – now it’s the turn for computing companies. To be clear: cloud computing does not take place in the physical clouds – rather in a virtual cloud, and the trend is growing. With the advent and talk of Big Data(bases) which recede into thousands of petabytes – of which I know not the term for – Oracle is gearing up to combat the likes of giant industry know-and-sell-it-all Amazon and the infamous, popular-kid-in-highschool Google, with their new cloud database titled 12c. “He said the new hardware could shift data twice as fast as machines from EMC, and costs one-eighth as much as machines from I.B.M.” (Hardy), and this is no small promise. As Hardy explains in the article, his so called superior database would be the first like it in the world and competitors are expected to push back. Hard.

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Should we be learning NoSQL? {3}

Last week, Hitachi visited Cal Poly Pomona and asked during the MISSA meeting if anyone could define a “cloud”.  A ” cloud” which relates to NoSQL, may benefit businesses because it offers an efficient and costly route to storing data on virtual servers.   NoSQL is a non-relational database approach to storing large amounts of data. An example of  database management systems that utilize this approach are MongoDB, Cassandra, HyperTable, CouchDB and Hadoop. In “10 things you should know about NoSQL databases” Guy Harrison does a quick analysis of  the advantages and disadvantages associated with a NoSQL database.

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SkySQL’s New Database Tool {2}

The article talks about how a company named SkySQL released a configuration tool that deploys databases to a cloud environment.  SkySQL offers its services to database administrators that lack the technical skills to transfer databases to a cloud environment.  The new company will offer its services on Amazon Web Services(AWS).  Through this new configuration, it allows its users to manage instances, isolate and reconfigure individual nodes, and backup and restore.  The article informs the reader about the compatibility of the new service and how it is compliant with the three most used MySQL distributions.  MySQL is a growing trend that allows companies to seek the latest performance optimization technologies.  SkySQL provides a lucrative service that received funding from a number of investors that hope to see the company grow and evolve.

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Big Data joined by Nodeable {1}

I chose to read the article, “Twitter’s Open Source Big Data Tool Comes to the Cloud Courtesy of Nodeable” by Klint Finley. This article gives details of a new Big Data analysis software by Nodeable called StreamReduce. This software is based on a software created by a Twitter owned company called storm. Finley goes on to state, “StreamReduce is essentially Storm hosted in the cloud, with a few extras such as connectors to Apache Hadoop” (Finley, 2012). Nodeable began as a company which developed software for both data management and analysis, however due to market demand they have shifted their attention to analysis. Nodeable is joining an increasingly competitive market where companies such as HStreaming already exists, and possible companies such as Amazon may join in the near future.

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AWS in Visual Studio {Comments Off on AWS in Visual Studio}

This past May, Amazon just announced that they will aim their efforts to make it easier for web developers to upload and implement asp.net applications.  Their first step forward in this direction is their announcement of allowing developers to take advantage of a program called Elastic Beanstalk.  Elastic Beanstalk is an application that takes care of deployment details such as load balancing and capacity provisioning.  Web developers can use Amazon Web Services (AWS) included in Visual Studio in order to develop the program.  They then can upload the asp.net application into Amazon’s web server.  From there, Elastic Beanstalk will automatically deploy it.

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Oracle Enters PaaS Market! {1}

The article I read for this week discusses Oracle’s plans to enter the PaaS (Platform as a Service) market to battle with Microsoft Azure, VMware Cloud Foundry and Amazon Web Services. Oracle’s entry into this market doesn’t mean much to users or to Oracle’s revenues. They are primarily entering to provide delivery and support of Java-based SaaS applications, primarily Oracle’s own. Whatever Oracle does in PaaS is strictly there for customization of the SaaS. Not very much information is available about the details of their new launch.

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AWS easier for asp.net developers. {1}

This article talks about Amazon Web Services making it a lot easier for ASP.NET to roll out cloud-based applications for their cloud service. Elastic Beanstalk allows for easy and care free deployment of new ASP.NET applications onto Amazon’s cloud service. This allows developers to focus more of their time on actually developing their applications instead of worrying about the cloud infrastructure and its deployment and cloud environment.

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