computing

Should we be learning NoSQL? {3}

by Shigom H
Last week, Hitachi visited Cal Poly Pomona and asked during the MISSA meeting if anyone could define a “cloud”.  A ” cloud” which relates to NoSQL, may benefit businesses because it offers an efficient and costly route to storing data on virtual servers.   NoSQL is a non-relational database approach to storing large amounts of data. An example of  database management systems that utilize this approach are MongoDB, Cassandra, HyperTable, CouchDB and Hadoop. In “10 things you should know about NoSQL databases” Guy Harrison does a quick analysis of  the advantages and disadvantages associated with a NoSQL database. read more...

Stormy Cloud or Clear Skies? {4}

by Abel R

Cloud computing refers to data storage on remote servers so that the data is available anywhere and anytime. This is concept of cloud computing, but there lies security concerns over how safe your information is. My article points out that in reality you have  no idea who is managing the computers with your information. You have no idea where they are. You have no idea what protections may or may not be in place to make sure your information is not stolen or disclosed or that it does not accidentally disappear.Another issue at hand is reliability, for example if a server crashes or is hacked into, your personal / private data can disappear. Lastly,the article talked about privacy issues within cloud computing. In the US for example, the article mentions that the legal standards are soft and the government can obtain your data without you knowing. read more...

The Choice to use Cloud Computing or Not {3}

by Ermie C
There are many businesses that understand that they must find ways to create more and efficient business models for revenue, production, and growth. This article is about how cloud computing may be the next solution for a growing business.  They also mention that if a business hasn’t been using cloud computing, then it will eventually be integrated in the business.  “According to Cisco, the global Internet traffic generated by cloud computing services will increase 12-fold by 2015.”  That’s a pretty big statement because that’s only 3 years away. This article explains five points to consider using cloud computing.  These five points are lower cost of ownership, dependability, scalability, mobility, and future-proofing.  Lower cost of of ownership because since all the applications and hardware are off site, the costs  are lowered significantly.  Dependability because if other specialized people are already handling the data, like Microsoft, it will be much easier to fix a problem when you have a specialist on the job.  This is however, to alternative of having an actual employee take care of the on-site server.  Scalability because if the number of customers grow, the cloud is like a blob where it can adjust to how many accounts and how much information is given.  Mobility to limit and to increase the access of information all over the world.  All they would need is an internet source and they can handle the information from home, etc.  Finally future-proofing because there is new technology being created every day, month, and year.  So with that, the provider that is helping a business owner with cloud computing can and will upgrade to the technology and find ways to incorporate or update the technology. read more...

Security Vulnerabilities With Cloud Computing {1}

by Daniel S
Cloud is composed of two sections – the user and the cloud. Cloud is possible due to “virtualization” which is the cloud’s central technology. Software-as-a-service (SaaS) is the most common form of cloud. Just Enough Operating System (JeOS) is another form of cloud where cloud handles most of the users tasks. Cloud computing has many security concerns. The following are all areas of concern for cloud’s security: XML signatures, browser security, denial of service, reputation fate sharing, side channel, loose control over data, and dependence on internet. XML signatures are used to ensure the authenticity of data within the “simple object access protocol (SOAP)”. This is an area for security concern because an attacker can duplicate a fragment of XML and add additional codes to control the computer to do what the attacker wants it to do. This is called “wrapper attack”. Browser security is another problem. Often times, “phishing” is used to steal log in information. Denial-of-Service (DOS) attacks happen when the attacker overloads the server with so many requests that the server ends up having too many requests to tend to and gets slowed down. Reputation fate sharing is where one hardware is shared amongst many users. Security risk depends on how it is abused by the users. Side channels is where information is channeled from one machine to another. Loosing control over data is another security risk. With PCs, there is control over how data is stored. With cloud, a third party is in total control of the data storage on the server. There has to be a certain level of trust between the user and the provider. The user has to trust the provider not to share information stored on the server and especially not to sell the information to other third parties. Dependence of the Internet increases as application numbers increase and the more we use cloud. This can be a security issue because if there is a major virus out, it could disable the Internet for many users. read more...

Cloud Computing Data Storage and Security {Comments Off on Cloud Computing Data Storage and Security}

by Michael V
The article written by Lara Farra describes the benefits in contrast to the risks of cloud computing. Cloud computing is described to be a method of moving data that was previously stored in your own personal computer to be stored in someone else’s servers in order to reduce hardware costs or to access them on any device with an internet connection. Despite the convenience of cloud computing, the author points out three major flaws in the system: security, server availability, and privacy. Many of these concerns are related to hackers who are expected to pose a major threat to the security of the client’s data, as cloud computing servers are growing to become serious targets for hackers who want to extract people’s information. The lack of laws regarding cloud computing also fails to set a suitably high standard for these data storage companies, and also allows for the government to easily attain information through these servers. read more...

Cloud Computing: Green or Not? {1}

by Joshua L
The article I chose was a study of whether cloud computing is actually more energy efficient/green than traditional computing practices where each user performs all computing on their own personal computer. The articles went into detail about the circumstances for which cloud computing can be much more efficient than conventional computing because of vast energy savings in transport due to inactivity and low screen refresh rates, but it also considered how cloud computing can actually consume more energy in transport than conventional computing due to high screen refresh rates. The conclusion of the article made it clear that “… the energy consumption of cloud computing needs to be considered as an integrated supply chain logistics problem, in which processing, storage, and transport are all considered together.” read more...

More Jobs from Cloud Computing {4}

by Alexander H
The ecosystem of jobs in the tech industry has consistently changed in order to keep up with growing technology. A recent article by Ingrid Lunden titled “Apple Makes 500k Jobs? Cloud Services Could Help Make 14 Million, With Half in China and India” outlines the possibility of “14 million jobs worldwide by 2015” with the expansion of cloud computing services. These figures are derived from research done by Microsoft and the IDC after Apple announced that they had created 500,000 jobs in the U.S. through the various links that the “ecosystem it has created”. The bulk of the new jobs will be related to the cloud computing industry and according to the IDC, there will be an “equal split” between small and large businesses. This growth is predicted to be most prevalent in developing countries, such as China and India, which follows the trend of IT outsourcing. read more...

Cloud Computing and IT {3}

by Joe C
Summary:

Cloud computing is making it easier for start up companies to take off as businesses can pay for the exact processing power they need. The rise of cloud computing is changing the IT market in that less IT positions will be needed, but instead businesses will be looking for desired skill sets. In particular, emerging skills include data mining, web analytics and statistics, and business intelligence. Computer science is constantly changing so students are slowly being taught to specialize in certain fields when they get out of college. Of course, they are taught the basics such as javascript and flash so they can at least start figuring out what to do when thrown in any direction. There are benefits of both generalization and specialization. In small companies, you will be the IT guy everybody goes to so you will need a decent understanding of everything. As with bigger companies, cloud computing is allowing companies to go process very detailed and advanced techniques so you will have to be able to handle advanced concepts and scaling. Overall, with all these emerging changes, the best type of employee that employers will want to hire are those who can easily change and adapt to these volatile conditions. read more...