The Mild Recreation of the iPhone 4

by Ermie C
This article is about how this programmer and developer named TJRus created a web application that mimics a little bit of the functions of an iPhone 4.  The capabilities are limited, but it was very impressive on the things that he created.  You can turn it on and off, and interactively press the home button, power button, and even slide to unlock.  I just had to mention this article because it is very impressive and why it’s impressive is because it’s completely created with 3395 lines of code. They also mentioned that back in November, Microsoft created a web based Windows Phone. read more...

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Cascading Style Sheets: Help?!

by Evin C
Beginning our work on HTML, we have recently added the concept of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to our web-design arsenal. Trying to understand something as in-depth and complex as CSS leaves us at a crossroads, what do we need to learn and where can we learn it? This article briefly touches on an organization assuming the title www.researchandmarkets.com and how it has “announced the addition of John Wiley and Sons Ltd’s new book ‘Beginning CSS: Cascading Style Sheets for Web Design, 3rd Edition'” to be offered on their website. This book is explained by the article’s author as such… read more...

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CSS helpful more ways than one!

by Daniel S
Adobe aims to implement magazines style to the Web with CSS (cascading style sheet) extension that adds new features to a person’s webpage. WebPages have a lot of features that you see in different types of magazines, but most WebPages need Flash to achieve the different kinds of features that CSS gives us.  Adobe is trying to makes things a little less hassle with a new extension that is currently proposing to the W3C. W3C is a validation check for the World Wide Web.  The article also talks about CSS Regions, the proposed additions from Adobe to the W3C  module. Some of the highlights of CSS include Story threading, region styling, content shapes and exclusions, and etc.  Region styling will apply size and color modes and other design elements to text depending on where it appears in the story. Some testers have already pointed out that CC Regions mixes too much layout detail among the code structure, but Adobe admits it is a work in progress and is looking to improve the product as it develops. read more...

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The impact of CSS on Mobile Phone

by David H
The article that I read this week talks about how cascading style sheet impact in the mobile phone. In the article, the author mentions that many designer of mobile try to use numerous expressions of varying interfaces, contexts, and automation to apply to mobile computing. One of most important thing that make mobile computing more dominant is that designer need to build the system in support of as many as possible unique. It includes in use and user define characteristic. The author also mentions that there are two emerging roles that make the impact on cascading style sheet in the context of computing to mobile computing. The first role is independence and the second role is usability.  The author emphasizes that the application of the cascading style sheet standard can improve data delivery across independent devices with varied bandwidth and resource availability. Therefore, cascading style sheet plays essential role in evolution and expansion of mobile computing. read more...

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Adobe’s CSS Regions

by Alexander H
A year ago, at Google’s I/O conference, Adobe made a bit of its own noise in the Web standards world by releasing CSS Regions. CSS Regions is an extension to the language used by Web developers to describe Web pages’ appearance. The technology was released as a prototype of the WebKit Web browser rendering engine, which powers Google Chrome and Apple Safari. “What Regions does is to make text on Web pages look more like it does on a well-presented publication – wrapping around images, for example, and filling from one text area to another…” (Muchmore 2011). The CSS Regions extension allows users to create a text flow between disparate regions, where they can see the technology in action. Text can also be formatted based on which region it enters. Adobe has submitted CSS Regions to the W3C hoping that once adopted by the Web standards body, the CSS extensions will be implemented in all browsers. read more...

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Specification of CSS 2.1

by Jasmine C
Since 2004, the W3C’s CSS Working Group has been working on creating an official specification for CSS and a decade later, they did.  CSS 2.1 was released June 2011 and it became the first official specification.  The author states that by CSS being the language style for the web, you can easily manage your pages and the content on your pages can be separated so that it can be viewed on different devices.  So much work has gone into the formation of CSS 2.1 because it is going to be the official specification for web styling.  CSS 2.1 has been tested repeatedly to make sure that it works with different browsers.  This allows for developers to ensure that the their features are presented the way they want on different browsers.  The working group has been in the process of developing CSS 3, which basically builds off of CSS 2.1, but instead of creating a whole new standard, CSS 3 is going to be released in different modules that will build CSS 2.1. read more...

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Cascading Style Sheets, the Works

by Davina V
This article explains how Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) works. “CSSs are a way to separate content from style” (Gibbs, 2004) and Styles can be broken down into the following types: text style, text layout, background, border, margin, element type, user interface, padding, and page layout. With a program so complex you would ask how CSS-compatible are the browsers. The thing is that no browser seems to get everything right, but there is enough compatibility between them for CSS to be effective. If you want more information on this the author suggested to refer to QuirksMode.org or to the DocFinder: 9731. Then the author goes on to give us examples like the one we had in class. Except, he gives us three rule types and explains a little. The three rule types are: HTML selectors, classes, and IDs. HTML selectors are like the tags we saw in class; a class, denoted by a period followed by a string, can be applied to different tags; and an ID denoted by a ‘#’ followed by a string is like a class but is only assigned to a style to a single tag. read more...

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CSS 2.1 and W3C

by Vincent S
Because our current lesson plan includes CSS, I decided to write about W3C and what purpose they serve.  W3C stands for the World Wide Web Consortium.  The W3C is an international community made up of individual smaller organizations.  Their job is to bring awareness of new internet technologies to the individual organizations who are members of the W3C.  They then form new standards and methods to regulate the use of the technology and whether or not to recommend them for use.  CSS 1.0 was first recommended by the W3C in the year 1996.  Recommendations have to be carefully examined by the W3C because the member organizations of the W3C have vested interest in the success of new internet technology.  It must be made clear that the new technology has real business application and is free of potential problems that can ultimately harm the World Wide Web as a whole.
Currently, we are in CSS version 2.1.  It was first brought to the attention of the W3C in 2004.  However, it did not receive official recommendation from them until June 2011.  Shortly after, announcements were made that they are now reviewing CSS 3, but probably will not see this version for a number of years.  The point is to know the process and be aware of the existence of the W3C.  This is an extremely important international organization that helps to safeguard the preservation of the Internet.  It is possible that a wrong or flawed technology can lead to instability.  So believe it or not, there is some regulation to web as an organization. read more...

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Yahoo Grabs A Drink

by Ermie C
This article is about how Yahoo is creating an easier way to create applications for the mobile framework and the great thing about it is that it’s open source. It’s purpose is to make it a lot easier to create applications for multiple platforms like iOS, Android, and personal computers. Yahoo is saying that it’s better because it solves the problem of sending and receiving data to and from devices. The name of this framework is called Mojito. This was created in November and is recently under the BSD license to become open source. Also, from recent applications, Mojito has been used mainly for creating apps for newspapers and magazines on the iPad and the app is called “Livestand”. This is actually part of the bigger project of Yahoo called “Cocktail”. This is because of the struggle that Yahoo has been having with the competition of Google. They want to create something that will maybe help boosts their “ratings” because they are rumored to be in a takeover. read more...

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HTML4 to HTML5 …why the change?

by Evin C
Having been discussing the differences between HTML4 and HTML5 in class, I feel this article is quite appropriate. To begin, one must understand the concept behind the different versions of HTML. In the article it is stated that, “HTML5 represents a structural change in how the web works. The term technically is used to describe the fifth generation of changes made to Hypertext Markup Language, or HTML, the main tool used to organize content on websites. However, it also is used as an umbrella term to include other recent changes made to web standards, such as Cascading Style Sheets, which are used to control colors, fonts and other visual elements of websites.” Now having a general understanding, the differences between HTML4 and HTML5 have been useful enough to already push businesses to adapt the new standards and deliver new websites based off HTML5. Although websites have already been produced with these standards, the article goes on to note that “HTML5 standards have yet to be approved formally by the World Wide Web Consortium, which defines the various standards developers should follow when building websites. Even so, new versions of most web browsers have been designed to work with many of the changes”. There are plenty of resources available to research the differences between the two but it is useful to understand the “behind-the-scenes” work that goes into these standards. read more...

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Visual Studio Upgrade

by Yeimy F
 

Microsoft’s developers focused on developing a new version of Visual Studio that offers a better user interface, code review, and supports HTML5 features. Moreover, they focused on fixing some of the basic functional problems generated by the previous version such as its tendency to freeze a lot which requires to reset your computer to make it run properly. They are “looking forward to better of ease-of-use in Visual Studio 11 and want better compliance with standards such as HTML5 and CSS.” Major complexities were removed of the previous version and now it has fewer tool bars and tool windows that make developers focus on the job. read more...

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