Database

Database Design And Recovery {1}

by Ming X
The article I read is called Database Recovery Options, by Lockwood Lyon. The backups of application data are very important and sufficient for any recovery needs. There should be a recovery strategy applied from the beginning, starting with database design. The author mentions that there are two things database designer must know; the recovery time objective (how long can the application data (or portions of the data) be unavailable?) and the recovery point objective (to what point must data be recovered? To a specific date/time? To the end of the most recently completed transaction?). It’s not only the database design that needs to consider recovery needs; applications that access the data must also be designed with recovery in mind. And at last, there should be a the infrastructure team supporting them. The author also mentions several database backup options for recovery; including database unloads, database full image copies, hot standby and Disk mirroring. read more...

The Big 5 of Big Data {3}

by Rudy P
The article I chose to blog about this week is,” Big Data Right Now: Five Trendy Open Source Technologies” by Mr. Tim Gasper of TechCrunch.com. The article starts of by saying Big Data is on everyones mind, and companies “will have spent $4.3 billion on Big Data technologies by the end of 2012” (Gasper, 2012). However,  author believes this is just the tip of the iceberg and states these initial investments will cause a chain reaction for upwards of $34 Billion in spendings through 2013. The field is so expansive, and there are so many players in Big Data (with more to come) the author provided a picture to show just how big this field is. read more...

Jobs in Big Data {3}

by Tseng H. K.
The article I read this week is “How to get a hot job in big data” by Dan Tynan. I choose this article because if you are getting to like database, you might want to consider about jobs that are related to databases. This article is great because it gives life story about how people who are not related database field previously switch to database jobs, and these people talks about little tips to get their job. read more...

First MegaUpload, now Mega {3}

by Eric C
As many people have heard by now, MegaUpload was seized by the FBI for copyright infringement and the clever designer behind it, Kim Dotcom, announced he will be opening up a new digital storage site simply called Mega. The main difference for Mega is the ability for users to encrypt right when anybody uploads files from their web browser. Using Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), nobody but the original uploader will be able to access the files. The decryption key is stored with the user whenever he/she needs to access their files and it was made clear Mega will not have access to these decryption keys. As a result, this will prevent any prying eyes from knowing what the contents of a user’s files are. Not only that, but Mega will store all customers’ data onto two different servers located in different countries. Each server will have the ability to have identical copies and work in real time. However, the article did not specify what kind of database technology will be used for the new servers and how the new server will work in terms of making redundant copies from across the world. read more...

Prior Knowledge: A Predictive Database For Developers {Comments Off on Prior Knowledge: A Predictive Database For Developers}

by Allen D
The company, Prior Knowledge publicly tested its software called Veritable, a predictive database for application developers at Disrupt San Francisco 2012(TechCrunch event). The company’s data predicting service is introduced through the company’s Veritable application programming interface, which they announced that it was designed to make applications smarter. In the article, “Prior Knowledge: A Predictive Database For Developers” by Alex Williams, CEO Eric Jonas talks about the usefulness and reliability of his predictive database technology. As we currently live in the digital data age, there is too much data for us to use. Despite the abundance, the world lacks people who actually know how to use its measures. Eric Jonas equates the level of using data effectively as a semantics approach due to its comparably large scale of messiness.  For years, the Prior Knowledge team has learned and mastered statistics in order to scale that knowledge into their software. The goal of their Veritable API software is for future developers to build applications that have the power to determine the actual concept of something by looking at its parts as a whole. For example, retailers would be able to determine their customer purchasing patterns by identifying the missing variables and “predicting” them within the system. According to Jonas, the service “magically fills in values”, that are potentially missing. So if there are missing attributes within the data in a database, the service would be able to analyze the causal relationships between these data and find other pieces of information associated to them in order to reach a predictive conclusion. read more...

Syncing Mobile Devices with Databases {2}

by Andrew M
The article I read was entitled “A Database Synchronization Algorithm for Mobile Devices” by Mi-Young Choi, Eun-Ae Cho, Dae-Ha Park, Chang-Joo Moon and Doo-Kwon Baik. This article talks about the synchronization problems that occur when trying to synch mobile devices to a database. Right now mobile devices create a small sized local copy of the database so that the user can do some work while disconnected. This is done also because having constant access to the network using a lot of power and bandwidth. The authors proposed solution is to have an algorithm that works around this and is known as Synchronization Algorithms based on Message Digest or SAMD. Essentially, this algorithm looks at tables of data and compares the mobile copy of the information to a server copy. If the data is different a synch will initiate. read more...

A Service Cloud Database {1}

by Ming X
In the article, the author talks about a  cloud database-as-a-service technology developed by Xeround that leverages the open source MySQL database. Xeround’s service can be described as a scale-out MySQL platform which enables organizations to cost-effectively solve database capacity issues that result from increased traffic and transaction volumes. Xeround CEO Razi Sharir said “Within the next few quarters you will see more and more Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) providers delivering our database as the database of choice,” And Xeround will be the core back-end database for the majority of PaaS offerings. Xeround’s service is based on a pay-per-use model, but lacks support with data warehousing and business intelligence. Xeround database is a distributed structure, which means if a user wants to do a full table scan from multiple sources it will take a long time. The Oracle and VMware both enter the market, which expanded the database-as-a-service and increase the competition. read more...

More Than 50,000 Accounts Have Been Hacked from ITWallStreet.com {3}

by Tseng H. K.
The article I read this week is “Hacker claims breach of 50,000 accounts from Wall Street IT recruiting firm” by Jaikumar Vijayan. On July 18 2012, a hacker named Masakaki who’s a member of a group called TeamGhostShell hacked into ITWallStreet.com. ITWallStreet.com is a website for who are seeking IT jobs in Wall Street firms. The hacker breached into resume database and snipped out more then 50,000 accouts with highly detailed data including person’s userID, name, phone number, address, and email.The list contains most of the major Wall Street firms including Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, Nasdaq, Dow Jones, and etc. Interest fact I found from article was that candidates have ranged from 40,000 to 400,000 for their salary. And everyone from entry-level junior developer to senior technology executives. read more...

Cloud computing the new big companies business? {3}

by Claudia J
The article that I read about was about the fact that Oracle announced the launch of their new IaaS cloud computing service. The company’s CEO Larry Ellison affirmed that the company will have a new cloud infrastructure service during the company’s earnings call. This new service is said that will allow the customers the access to a secure virtualized computer power hosted in an Oracle data center. This new service will also bring other business to Oracle since this new product will also allow them to sell customers software to build “identical services” in their own data centers. All these new products are mainly created to allow them, the customers, to move workloads back and forth between their private clouds and them. read more...

Relational Database 101 {2}

by Kathy S
For those students who have no prior experience or knowledge of database design, this is a great read for you. The author of the article explains the introductory terms and information about how data is organized and represented in a Relational Database. The following are the basics one needs to know. In a relational database, data is stored in a two-dimensional matrix (table) and within the table there are multiple columns and rows. Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) software is used to give ability to users to read and manipulate data. The RDBMS relies on SQL (Structured Query Language) constructs and keywords to access the tables and data that is contained within the tables’ columns and rows. It clarifies that each table in a relational database contains information about a single type of data and has a unique name that is distinct from all other tables in that schema (a grouping of objects/tables that serve a similar business function). The author points out the key to good relations. The primary key is very important; it is a column that ensures uniqueness for every row in a table. The author then explains how a relational database connects (relates) tables and organizes information across multiple tables. The foreign key is an important connector that identifies a column or set of columns in one table that refers to a column or set of columns in another table. The author then states that the key to understanding relational databases is knowledge of data normalization and table relationships. The objective of normalization is to eliminate redundancy and thereby avoid future problems with data manipulation. There are 5 most commonly accepted normal forms, but many programmers, analysts, and designers do not normalize beyond the 3rd normal form,  although experienced database designers may. The author goes on to talk about what 1st, 2nd, and 3rd normal forms look like. Lastly, the article mentions how SQL fits in. SQL helps to create new data, delete old data, modify existing data, and retrieve data from a relational database. read more...