Database

Defining Terms in Data Models {Comments Off on Defining Terms in Data Models}

by Kathy S
There’s a challenge when it comes to defining terms for data models. The author of the article asks the question, “Does defining the actions something performs solve our definition issues? Or are we instead adding complexities, for example, assigning more than one meaning to the same data element.”  The responses for those questions were grouped into 3 categories. “Defining a term by its actions is an effective technique” according to Madhu Sumkarpalli, who is a business intelligence consultant. He says it is better because that way they can be specific about the term or close to specific rather than being generic and abstract. Basing the term on its actions can define it appropriately and paint the proper picture. “Defining something by its actions is part of the solution” according to Amarjeet Virdi, who is a data architect. He says data entities are meant to represent real life objects and those objects perform functions. Then a new question comes up when the object ceases to perform its function then what? does it cease to exist or have no value to the business anymore? Complexity increases. “Defining something by its actions is not recommended” according to Wade Baskin, who is senior database architect. He says mixing process with data is a dangerous practice. Data should have only one definition regardless of the process. If the data changes as it matures then the change is reflected as a different data element. It is not good to change the current definition of an element based on process or location. Allowing fields with multiple meanings is dangerous and should be avoided. The author feels that defining a term by what it does is effective and it is at least a starting point because most business professionals define things by the roles they play. For example a person playing the role of a customer. The problem is though, is that this approach may eventually lead to data integration issues, hidden business logic and the question of what will happen to the term itself when the activity it performs stops. read more...

Importance Data Modeling {2}

by Claudia J
The article that I read about talked about that in order for us to be good in working with databases it is important to acquire knowledge in security management, data integration and data recovery in the case of a disaster. Designing a good database doesn’t consist only in linking tables together; it requires lots of skills combined to be able to pull off a complete database structure that will run optimally. Many companies tend to fail when trying to design a good database because developing a good database model requires lots of time to create a well-model design and most of the companies don’t count with the necessary time to allocate to the data modeling phase. read more...

Oracle’s 12c DBMS {1}

by Eric C
Scheduled for release in 2013, Oracle recently released details regarding the next generation database management system called Oracle 12c. The “c” stands for cloud, as Oracle is focused on making 12c cloud computing friendly. The main selling point of 12c is the ability to virtualize databases in a sever, or hold many instances of different databases on the same system. This featured is dubbed “multi-tenancy” by Oracle’s CEO Larry Ellison and benefits from decreasing hardware costs for major corporations. If a corporation has many database servers running Oracle’s previous DBMS, 12c can consolidate up to 250 separate databases in one server, thus maximizing CPU usage and reducing hardware needed to run the database. Consolidating multiple databases into one server may impact performance as a result of virtualization, however, Oracle would not comment on how they would combat this issue. Ellison only stated that 12c “uses one-sixth as much hardware and runs five times as many databases.” When it comes to security, Oracle stated 12c will feature enhanced security measures to make sure data are isolated and secured from users of other databases. read more...

Using Database to Combat Cellphone Theft {4}

by Ming X
In the article AT&T to Start Blocking Stolen Cellphones This Week, the author talks about At&t’s program as announced in April. At&t created a database to store information for every cellphone which on its network; and allowed its customers to report stolen cellphones, then At&t can disable any stolen cellphones to prevent reactivation of stolen devices on its own network, and make it more difficult for cellphone thieves to sell the devices back on the black market. The National Database planned to work toward a cross-carrier solution. read more...

Boost Up Your Database Speed to Get More Traffic on Your Website {4}

by Tseng H. K.
The article I read this week is “Speeding Up Your Website’s Database” by Paul Tero. The author is mentioning speed is always has been big issue when we design websites. Since April 2010, Google has announced they will include website speed category on their search ranking, website speed became even more important part of all websites. Google’s threshold for being fast-loading website is 1.5 second. The author talks about from briefly what database is. Next, what problems in database causes slow down a website. Finally, the author gives lists of solution to optimize the database, from very simple technic to complex solution using technical terms. read more...

MySQL Discovers A Need For A Defense {3}

by Katheryn T
I read an interesting article about what was better for a business that has a high volume of data; MySQL or NoSQL. In order to really understand it I looked up what NoSQL is. Essentially, NoSQL is a type of database management system that is not built on tables and does not use a structured query language. This article specifically talked about the advantages of MySQL verses the new NoSQL. In the typical ER model, the architectural structure is limited. This causes concerns with large inflow of data. It isn’t unmanageable, just an apprehension. NoSQL was designed to manage these large inflows of data better and faster. PayPal uses MySQL because of the architectural benefits. They had to think about how to build the system to accommodate for large amounts of users. “The approach they used, called architectural tiling, was designed to ‘build a system that scales to an arbitrary number of users. And [they] did that with SQL,'”(Jackson, 2012). MySQL is used in many businesses because of familiarity and data security. It is also used as a “building block — use it as a really strong core of features that we understand, and build solutions on top of that core”(Jackson, 2012). read more...

This Week on Survivor {1}

by Asim K
10,000 engineers and business people gathered together on September 30, 2012 to discuss the future of a company that made extraordinary announcements for computing that brings promise of a revolutionary future for people everywhere. That company isn’t Apple. Although unknown to most, these suited men gathered to hear about Oracle’s venture into the cloud. NASA missions started the trend decades ago – now it’s the turn for computing companies. To be clear: cloud computing does not take place in the physical clouds – rather in a virtual cloud, and the trend is growing. With the advent and talk of Big Data(bases) which recede into thousands of petabytes – of which I know not the term for – Oracle is gearing up to combat the likes of giant industry know-and-sell-it-all Amazon and the infamous, popular-kid-in-highschool Google, with their new cloud database titled 12c. “He said the new hardware could shift data twice as fast as machines from EMC, and costs one-eighth as much as machines from I.B.M.” (Hardy), and this is no small promise. As Hardy explains in the article, his so called superior database would be the first like it in the world and competitors are expected to push back. Hard. read more...

Should we be learning NoSQL? {3}

by Shigom H
Last week, Hitachi visited Cal Poly Pomona and asked during the MISSA meeting if anyone could define a “cloud”.  A ” cloud” which relates to NoSQL, may benefit businesses because it offers an efficient and costly route to storing data on virtual servers.   NoSQL is a non-relational database approach to storing large amounts of data. An example of  database management systems that utilize this approach are MongoDB, Cassandra, HyperTable, CouchDB and Hadoop. In “10 things you should know about NoSQL databases” Guy Harrison does a quick analysis of  the advantages and disadvantages associated with a NoSQL database. read more...

The Data Model Owner {2}

by Kathy S
The author (of the article I read) is a data modeling consultant and instructor, and he asked the question,”Who owns the data model?” He received over 100 responses.  It is known that an organization has a team of skilled developers, and these developers do the data modeling. When a developer from this organization asks,”Who owns the data model?” How does one respond? 37% say the business should own the model because “the modelers don’t ‘own’ the data model – they are only the caretakers of the model.”  22% say the development team because as the owners, they would keep all the members informed about changes while maintaining the ability for everyone to make changes to the model as needed. 15% say the individual developer because they have the skill and knowledge to manage the data model well. 11% say the application manager or database administrator because they are the ones who feel the pain when the application is not working properly and they are the ones who are contacted first if the application isn’t working as it should. 15% say no one owns the model simply because no one may have the big picture in mind. read more...

4 Business models for an effective Governance program {1}

by Garcello D
The article I have chosen for this week’s blog is called “The Data Model’s Role in Data Governance,” It’s written by Jonathan G. Geiger and in the article he basically describes multiple levels of data models. At first I had no idea what Data governance was but after a little bit of research I found out that “Data governance refers to the overall management of the availability, usability, integrity, and security of the data employed in an enterprise”(www.searchdatamanagement.com). The author believed that data models play a bigger role, just as big as the other components when it comes to the data governance program. The Author then proceeds to compare and explain the subject-Area model, the business data model, the system data model, and the Technology model in detail. He also connects the 4 as he shows why they would be essential for an effective governance program. read more...