DBMS

MySQL over Microsoft SQL Server {3}

After several hours of reading Microsoft support articles on how to install Microsoft SQL Server 2008 on my machine, I finally got everything to work.  However, for the amount of time sacrificed I wanted to find some significant differences between MySQL and Microsoft SQL Server.  To my surprise, I found out that MySQL 5.1(150MB) is about the same size as Microsoft’s  .NET framework,  a necessary component in the installation of  Microsoft SQL Server 2008(2GB). A possibly bias article entitled “Why Move to MySQL from Microsoft SQL Server” written by one of MySQL’s director Robert Schamuer,  makes a strong case for MySQL.

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Database Performance Innovations {1}

This week I read the journal article called “Revolutionize Database Performance”. This article focuses on 7 innovations that the author feels will revolutionize data warehousing. These 7 innovations are important because RDBMS platforms, which had worked well in the past, have struggled since they were not designed to query against the large amount of data that businesses have today. The seven innovations he discusses include: column store architecture, aggressive compression, multiple sort orders, automatic database design, recovery by query, concurrent data loading and querying, and standards-based appliances. According the author, adopting new approaches to RDBMS design will allow detailed searches to be processed 50 or 100 times faster and at a fraction of the cost.

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First MegaUpload, now Mega {3}

As many people have heard by now, MegaUpload was seized by the FBI for copyright infringement and the clever designer behind it, Kim Dotcom, announced he will be opening up a new digital storage site simply called Mega. The main difference for Mega is the ability for users to encrypt right when anybody uploads files from their web browser. Using Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), nobody but the original uploader will be able to access the files. The decryption key is stored with the user whenever he/she needs to access their files and it was made clear Mega will not have access to these decryption keys. As a result, this will prevent any prying eyes from knowing what the contents of a user’s files are. Not only that, but Mega will store all customers’ data onto two different servers located in different countries. Each server will have the ability to have identical copies and work in real time. However, the article did not specify what kind of database technology will be used for the new servers and how the new server will work in terms of making redundant copies from across the world.

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The logic of DBMS And RDMS {1}

This week’s article I have decided to blog about is called “What Makes a Database Management System Relational”. This is an old article written in winter of 1995 by Steven Bare as an Info tech update. This week in class we have learned about Logical Database design and the Relational Model, but we didn’t exactly go over what database management and relational database management systems are, therefore I will enlighten you. A database management system is a system which helps users organize and extract information by providing a structure for the data and the tools which help the user use that data. A Relationship Database management system is a database management system but it follows a set of non-arbitrary rules which were created by its founder E. F. Codd. Relational theory is the core of this system as it allows flexibility, usefulness and power to the user.

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Alpha Flight for FoundationDB {1}

The article I chose to blog about this week is, “FoundationDB — Not Your Standard NoSQL Database” by Mr. Alex Williams of TechCrunch. This article discusses the new database management system known as FoundationDB which is currently in alpha and will be in beta by the end of this year. FoundationDB takes many of its strengths from NoSQL, however executives state they  ” have a database that is industrial strength, scalable, and fault tolerant”(Williams, 2012). They believe that over the years NoSQL databases become a bit difficult to scale to large levels, and can be difficult to build on top of the databases. FoundationDB distinguishes  itself from other database management systems by how, “serves as a foundation for different data models that can be layered on top of FoundationDB” (Williams, 2012). Its main purpose is to become the foundation for database environments by being able to manage both scalability and transactions. This looks to be very promising and will hope to enter a tough market later this year.

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Oracle’s 12c DBMS {1}

Scheduled for release in 2013, Oracle recently released details regarding the next generation database management system called Oracle 12c. The “c” stands for cloud, as Oracle is focused on making 12c cloud computing friendly. The main selling point of 12c is the ability to virtualize databases in a sever, or hold many instances of different databases on the same system. This featured is dubbed “multi-tenancy” by Oracle’s CEO Larry Ellison and benefits from decreasing hardware costs for major corporations. If a corporation has many database servers running Oracle’s previous DBMS, 12c can consolidate up to 250 separate databases in one server, thus maximizing CPU usage and reducing hardware needed to run the database. Consolidating multiple databases into one server may impact performance as a result of virtualization, however, Oracle would not comment on how they would combat this issue. Ellison only stated that 12c “uses one-sixth as much hardware and runs five times as many databases.” When it comes to security, Oracle stated 12c will feature enhanced security measures to make sure data are isolated and secured from users of other databases.

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mySQL, NoSQL, and now NewSQL? {4}

In today’s fast paced world with data growing at an exponential rate, a database must be scalable and perform well with today’s demands in storing data. SQL databases have been around for decades and the basic architecture wasn’t created with scalability in mind. Apparently there have been new advances in database technology and it includes instances of NoSQL and NewSQL. Michael Stonebraker is a seasoned database creator who is now a chief technology officer for VoltDB, explained the benefits of using “NewSQL” to better benefit today’s demands for database performance. Stonebraker stated that traditional SQL systems have many limitations and that includes performance. SQL databases are also not scalable onto more than one server. If one were to make an SQL database scale onto more servers for better performance, it would be very complicated to manage. NoSQL was indeed created to improve on scalability and is increasing in popularity; it also has its own limitations as well. The main problem with NoSQL is that it cannot perform complicated mathematical queries. However with NewSQL, it improves on all of the issues with SQL and NewSQL, making it a more efficient database system that can process requests faster and can scale to more than one server. According to Joab Jackson, the author of the article entitled “’NewSQL’ Could Combine the Best of SQL and NoSQL” from PCWorld, using NewSQL “can execute transactions 45 times faster than a typical relational database system” and “can scale across 39 servers, and handle up to 1.6 million transactions per second across 300 CPU cores” (Jackson).

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MongoDB Gains Financial Support {Comments Off on MongoDB Gains Financial Support}

10Gen, a major NoSQL Database technology vendor, has just gained 42 million dollars from several organizations, Computerworld.com reports; this increases the capital invested in the company by over 100% of its previous value – according to the article, “10gen has raised about $73 million from a slew of big name investors,” including MTV, NY Times, HP, and Viacom (Vijayan, 2012).  The article also details various other statistics concerning the MongoDB developer: 400 commercial customers with over 1000 servers are utilizing MongoDB, and the staffing has increased to 130 members from 20.  MongoDB’s uses horizontal scaling as opposed to vertical (think of vertical as creating a single table full of user information, and horizontal has a table schema with individual tables without a central database storing the data) and the massive growth of the company is credited to the approach that MongoDB is taking.  An advantage include the ability to run on hardware clusters, easily incorporate new hardware into the cluster, and doesn’t utilize the traditional structure that the typical DB admin imagines – in fact, it can function without any pre-defined schema at all!  Competitors in the NoSQL field such as Couchbase and DataStax have also gained tens of millions in investments as well, but so far, 10Gen leads the way.

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Migrating from Access to a High-End DBMS {2}

This article talks about the users which are ready to make the next step forward and advance from the simplicity of Microsoft Access to a much more multifaceted Microsoft SQL server.  The author speaks of the many reasons why you should be willing to migrate your shared access database to a client/ server.  Access is less able to manage file sharing efficiently. When network traffic increases, access’s responsiveness decreases.  The author also states that Access can handle databases only up to 2 GB and has only  a few high availability features. This could be a big reason why companies will look for other solutions, veering away from Access. 2GB of information is very minimal for some organizations database. Microsoft Access does not backup and restore files dynamically while the database is in use.  This makes using a client/ server for your database much beneficial  because the desire for better security and a dynamic web back end makes it much worth it to go in the route to a SQL server. If you believe you need to make the approach t Sybase Adapative Server Enterprise, you should allow the phased implementations. You should follow these that are listed in Matthew Sarrel’s guidelines below to make the migration easier.

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Synchronizing database on mobile devices {2}

This article relates to the synchronization between mobile devices and databases. Since mobile technology as advanced and equipment have led to the emergence of a new computing environment and a variety of small sized mobile devices such as smartphones and PDAs that has been popularized. The problem is that mobile devices do not have much computing power and they rely on batteries; constant access to network is difficult due to narrow bandwidth. Mobile devices need to download the database when connected and then work off-line and by doing so there are inevitable inconsistencies between the server-side database and the mobile database. Commercial DBMS vendors offer solutions to maintain the database synchronized between the two devices however these solutions are dependent of the server-side database using dependent information such as metadata. Because of these restrictions, the extensibility, adaptability and flexibility of mobile business systems are markedly decreased. The article suggests the implementation of SAMD (Synchronization algorithms based on message digest) which resolves synchronization problems using only standard SQL queries. The SAMD makes the images at the table of the server-side database and the mobile database using a message digest algorithm; then the images and the message digest values are saved in the message digest tables on both sides. The images are compared and select the rows needed for synchronization. The SAMD would provide extensibility, adaptability and flexibility.

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