DBMS

Database for Medical Images in Developing Nations {3}

by Alexander H
Medical images have provided a strong foundation for the health care system in diagnosis and medical studies. Traditionally, developing nations have recorded and viewed images from film rolls. However, as technology advances, digitizing these images have become the normal means of use in many countries, but developing nations have yet to see this switch. “Database Management System for Digitized Medical Images” is a journal that seeks to eradicate this gap in technologies and bring together medical images into one cohesive package. The journal states the importance of having the ability to share medical images in a system that can be readily available to the health care system. Essentially, the database that is proposed will take medical images and digitize them. These images are then stored in the database where the user can call for these images and the database converts them back to grayscale for viewing. The conversion process will be handled by a program called Matlab. Once compiled, SQL will be the database management system of choice. Handling the user end viewing of the database will be the result of C# programming. The journal believes that bridging the gap with the use of this database management system will greatly affect the health care industry and its worldwide application can share rare medical anomalies readily. read more...

Sexual Assault Database developed by Department of Justice {3}

by Alexander H
As technology becomes more advanced, it is necessary to enhance and improve databases in order to maximize efficiency. Rick Maze, an author at the Army Times, wrote an article explaining the changes that a database is undergoing in order to improve its usability. The Department of Justice is planning to deploy a special database this summer that is aimed at sexual assault prevention. The Sexual Assault Database Management System, or SADMS, has been in the making for years and is nearing its final stages. This database will contain the names of victims and alleged offenders, the nature of the assaults, and the outcomes of any legal action. read more...

Benefits of Database Sharding {3}

by Jim J
Relational databases maintain and keep data reliable. Updating the database by adding, removing, or changing data is easy with relationships and data integrity offered by relational databases. NoSQL on the other hand is another way of managing data without the complications in setting up a relational database, the cons being difficulty to maintain. An important benefits is better scalability and performance than relational databases with large amounts of data. Database sharding offers a middle grand between the two; it allows for performance and scalability benefits of NoSQL, but maintains data integrity akin with relational databases. With database sharding, the computing power of the relational database is broken up into many severs each with their own CPU, memory, and disk thus resulting in better performance than traditional relational databases. read more...

NoSQL database service {Comments Off on NoSQL database service}

by Abel R
In an article posted on Wired.com titled ” Amazon goes back to the future with NoSQL database”, Author Caleb Garling explains what “NoSQL” is used for and why Amazon is a key player using this type of database versus others. “NoSQL” is a type of database management which is known for its use with unstructured information. Garling talks about DynamoDB, an Amazon Web Service that is a fully managed NoSQL database service that provides fast and predictable performance with seamless scalability (http://aws.amazon.com/dynamodb/). Most important is its scalability which enables its subscribers to scale up or scale down your use of DynamoDB with ease and you only pay what you use. read more...

Tax Season is Over…Did You Notice Anything Different? {2}

by Alexander H
Tax season is now over and those who filed at the very last minute may be seeing their return much sooner than previous years.  For over 25 years, the IRS has been developing a new database management system to replace the older system that has been used for more than five decades. The new system dubbed Customer Account Database Engine 2, or CADE 2, was finally utilized this year to handle the 2011 tax season.  IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman stated the new system was designed to “enable faster processing of returns and better customer service, while cutting down fraud”.  Perhaps the greatest addition to this system is the fact that all returns are now handled on a daily basis rather than weekly, as it has been done since 1960.  The base of this system was to get rid of code that was irrelevant and get rid of the legacy environments that were extremely complex to process.  By utilizing this system, nearly 60% of taxpayers were able to receive their refunds in eight days or less, which is a big feat considering that is a 30% increase from last year. read more...

MySQL Cluster 7.2: MySQL’s Rival to NoSQL Competitors {Comments Off on MySQL Cluster 7.2: MySQL’s Rival to NoSQL Competitors}

by Arlyn R
MySQL’s answer to NoSQL competitors in the big data web market: MySQL Cluster 7.2. Joab Jackson (2012) authored, “Oracle Preps MySQL Cluster for Web Use,” documenting some of the features that is expected to boost performance for the open-source DBMS. A significant feature of the upgrade allows query workload execution to occur on a server local to the data (adaptive query localization). Thus, intensive join queries that include multiple tables will compute and return results substantially faster; per Oracle’s claim, “…70 times faster than what previous versions of MySQL Cluster could do” (as cited by Jackson, 2012). Another benefit to the upgrade is the ability to shard across individual data nodes located in varying data centers, which contributes to the performance boost upgrade. MySQL Cluster 7.2 will also include an application programming interface, Memcached. This API allows for easier and rapid access to frequently used queries by storing the common key-value calls in RAM. Memcached extends MySQL Cluster’s usability since the API is also utilized by firms that deal with large data sets such as Facebook. In conclusion, MySQL Cluster 7.2 has leveraged the benefits of both SQL and NoSQL databases by increasing usability, scalability and overall performance. read more...

FileMaker 12: On-The-Go Database Management {3}

by Robert T
In Tony Bradley’s article ,”Four Reasons to Consider FileMaker12,” featured on PCWorld.com, Bradley explains how even user’s who aren’t very experienced in managing a complex database could turn something difficult, into something relatively easy and very useful. FileMaker is an application used to create relational databases as well as implement a user interface that allows users to easily view and modify existing data. According to Bradley, “The new FileMaker 12 promises to make it easier than ever to create sensational databases that look good across multiple platforms and devices.” Which is exciting because not only is software able to make database management much easier by including multimedia into the information with a simple drag – and – drop, but it allows for users to take this information with them wherever they go. Using both of these features will allow users of FileMaker 12 able to directly record a video with their handheld device and place it directly into the database multimedia container fields. FileMaker applications are only available on Mac OS, Windows,  and iOS. It would be to the benefit of the company to include even the Android Market as well. read more...

My word, I do declare!……a new DBMS philosophy {1}

by Brian T
Imagine a world where your thoughts control your actions are determined before your body even receives the signal. You simply issue a mental command and the path to that command’s conclusion is instantly given to you. Sound cool?

Well that’s unfortunate, because such a thing does not exist. But what does exist is a database methodology with a similar goal in mind. The concept of declarative management is relatively simple – your input statement provides an end goal and the self-sustaining management system processes a unique way of reaching it. This scholarly article completely outlines and details the components of such a system and introduces the techniques that it would utilize. One such technique is target binding for specific query classifications. Another key notion behind the system is automating various processes in order to maintain it’s self-integrity. read more...

Tips on how to choose the correct data types {4}

by Willen L
In this article the author focuses on the importance of proper data types in order to maintain data quality. He gives us some general tips and rules to follow to ensure the correct type is chosen. First, if the data is numeric, favor SMALLINT, INTEGER, OR DECIMAL Data types. Second, if the data is a character, use CHAR or VARCHAR data types. Third, if the data is date and time, use DATE, TIME, or TIMESTAMP data types. Lastly, if the data is a multimedia, use GRAPHIC, VARGRAPHIC, BLOB, or DBCLOB data types. These rules seem simple enough but he states that it is a widespread problem that people are using improper data types. The most common ones he encountered were using CHAR type on date data and using CHAR type on numerical data. Choosing the wrong data type may slow down the system and in general it is best to assign correct data type that best matches the values in the domain to improve overall data quality. read more...

MySQL Website Compromised to Inject Malware {3}

by Daniel L
Database management systems are an integral part of many products and services that are offered over the World Wide Web.  MySQL, one of the most common open source database management systems and key component of the LAMP software  stack, caught the attention of hackers on Monday, September 26, 2011.  According to security vendor, Armorize, the  hacker used JavaScript code to inject malicious software onto Windows PC users who visited the MySQL website between the hours of 5 a.m. to 11 a.m. Pacific Time Monday.  Armorize also stated that the particular method that was used to attack website visitors is known as the Black Hole exploit kit; however, there is no indication of what the malware was designed to do.  This is not the first time that the MySQL website has been hacked, they were hit earlier in the year, as well as other open source websites such as Linux.com and Kernel.org.  A hacker on a Russian forum using the alias, sourcec0de, claims to have full permissions and administrative rights to the MySQL servers, and he is even willing to sell root access for $3,000.  Although, it is unclear if the hacker had root access, he posted screenshots which showed that the MySQL web servers were indeed compromised. read more...