Facebook

The future of Facebook’s Mobile {2}

by Ronny W
Facebook is one of the biggest social networking site. Users are increasingly accessing Facebook via thier mobile devices. Study have shown that Facebook mobile user use more than 7 hours on average. The way for Facebook to make money is by advertisement. Mark Zuckerberg (cheif of Facebook) has set “his top priorities this year are to transform Facebook’s mobile and advertising experiences and further integrate online apps into the platform.” (DesMarais, 2012) Since there are more people accessing Facebook via mobile devices, they are going to figure out ways to have advertisements on mobile. Mobile activities have been tracked by different applications, and so is Facebook. Facebook mobile app have just started, and they will gather more data to better target each users on products or likes.
Facebook is gathering all sorts of data from its users. They are gathering geo-tagging data from users when they check-in to places. They are gathering product likes from users. They are gathering activities from users. Facebook’s database is something that needs to be constantly monitored. Their database needs to be updated constantly. I could only imaging how hard it would be to query a database such as this.
I think Facebook going IPO will help to make their social networking site to be a lot better. Now they are under some pressure, so they need to improve their service to be better than before. Their database is so huge and rich. They are able to gather relevant informations to help advertise products and services to individual needs. It is good that they don’t just gather data, but they actually process the gathered data and process it into information. read more...

How Facebook is Killing SMS {2}

by Jongwoo Y
As Facebook is getting ready to become a initial public offering (IPO) in the coming weeks, it has been able to successfully tick off many of the wireless providers around the world today. Facebook boasts over 800 million users worldwide, an amount that nearly triples that of the population of the United States (~311 million); nearly half of these users connect to Facebook through mobile applications (Maisto, 2012). With the use of mobile apps created by Facebook, which include the Facebook Messaging App, many of the users are forgoing the use of their normal SMS texts and using apps instead to send messages to their friends. This has become a huge problem for many wireless providers as it has drastically effected the amount of SMS revenue that these telecommunication giants have grown accustomed to. Just last year, SMS messaging accounted for about 20% of the revenue for many of the telecommunication giants; however, this number has taken a great hit. Carriers in Denmark have begun “selling SMS as a low-cost, flat -rate product that’s part of a monthly data subscription package” (Maisto, 2012). Mobile Carriers in Denmark have recently added many flat rate messaging plans into all of their basic monthly subscriptions to try and counter-balance the pressure that Facebook has put on their SMS revenue. If this works out for these Danish carriers, expect to see this as common practice around the world. Just next week, Facebook plans to bring in between $5-10 billion and have one of the largest market debut in the US in nearly four years (Maisto, 2012). However, according to Mark Zuckerberg, CEO and founder of Facebook, “Facebook was not originally created to be a company. It was built to accomplish a social mission: to make the world more open and connected (Maisto, 2012).” Too bad Mark, it looks like you’re trampling over not only your best friends, but mobile carrier conglomerates around the world! read more...

Facebook’s Mobile HTML Dilemma {1}

by Jongwoo Y
With the new wave of mobile HTML5 applications coming through, Facebook is displeased with the rate Google and Apple have added HTML5 compatibility to their mobile browsers. Facebook recently announced that their HTML5 website has twice as many users than their Android or iOS counterparts (Constine, 2012). The problem with the applications that iOS and Android is that users are not able to use many of the basic Facebook features (photo uploads and high-performance HTML5 animations) that HTML5 users are able to enjoy. Faced with this problem, Facebook decided to create the W3C community group, a group dedicated to mobile device/application advancement, however, Apple and Google, the two big companies that control the mobile operating system market, have refused to join. This has become a huge problem as Facebook had over 105 million users on iOS and 100 million android users. Facebook is trying their best to convince these two companies to advance their browser’s HTML5 compatibility because the ads that they will be able to run under HTML5 compatible websites will be able to garner more revenue than the ones that are currently being used on the applications themselves. The W3C community group will become a huge factor in Facebook’s future probability; due to the fact that Facebook will soon be a public company and that Facebook’s ad revenues will be able to gain a significant lift which will make the company even more desirable (Constine, 2012). Though companies such as Mozilla and Opera have joined the group, iOS and Android are the companies that Facebook desire to attain. On the developer side, if HTML5 were to gain more compatibility with Android and iOS, developers would be able to port their applications to either of those two platforms with greater ease. This will be able to make more applications readily available to the general public and give developers more time to improve their current apps rather than investing time into porting them. read more...

Facebook likely to back away from HTML5 for now {2}

by Taylor G
The article I choose to talk about related to Facebook betting big on HTML5 by releasing their iPhone and Android applications in HTML5.  The reason Facebook decided to use HTML5 instead of the native software for the Google owned Android, and the Apple owned iOS because they viewed HTML5 as a neutral platform.  They were able to build apps that were unified across various platforms from Android’s and iPhone’s.  Facebook was hoping that other mobile developers would also move in the direction towards HTML5.  Since Facebook has so much traffic over their News Feeds and the millions of Like buttons grabbing information from all over.  There is a huge drawback to the switch to HTML5 though, and its pretty significant.  Unlike the native software for platforms, HTML5 had to load like a webpage within the apps causing huge delays when opening the app, taking pictures, uploading them to the internet, since it had to load like a real page.  Up until last week Instagram, a social networking site that shares only photos and comments, was only on the iOS platform.  Last week Instagram released their Android app and has reached 30 million users.  A week ago, Facebook purchased Instagram for $1 Billion.  Some are betting that this huge purchase allows Facebook to back out of HTML5 for the time being. read more...

Casino Cloud Built by Gaming Firm {Comments Off on Casino Cloud Built by Gaming Firm}

by Bach B
Will we not need to go to Las Vegas to gamble in the future? Might be, since a casino-specific cloud has been built in the US, in a further sign of the trend towards industry-tailored software as a service solutions. International Game Technology (IGT) is building casino software through the cloud by using the AppLogic cloud computing platform from CA Technologies. Chris Satchell, chief technology officer at IGT, said, “Casinos of all sizes will find it more cost effective and have higher agility in managing their gaming content through the IGT Cloud.” read more...

Deleted pictures from 3 yrs ago still online?! {5}

by Shahravi
We live in a world where we have a separate online social life. We all use social sites like Facebook, and Twitter. I read an article which talks about how private is your information online. To be specific, the article talks about the pictures we post online. We all like to post out pictures online. There are times where we post the pictures we later realize we shouldn’t have posted. There are pictures of you that your friends posted but you didn’t want them to. What happens when you “delete” those pictures? Are they gone forever or you can still find them? It turns out, that you can’t “delete” your pictures completely. The pictures you thought you or your friends deleted like three years ago, you can still find them and search for them online. It turns out that as long as you have the direct link to the picture on Facebook servers, pictures are there indefinitely. As long as you or someone has a direct link to the .jpg file in question, the pictures are always available. read more...

Google Now Indexing Facebook for Comments {3}

by Cary C
This article brings to light that Google is now indexing all pages that are using AJAX and JavaScript.  This effect will be very noticeable for sites such as FaceBook that use these technologies for comments.  Essentially this will mean that any comments you make on Facebook in the public forums are now indexed.  This will also apply to users of sites such as Facebook that do not have their profiles set to private.  While Google insists that the data they are indexing and making searchable was already public information on the Internet, many users are concerned that their privacy is being violated. read more...

Flash Lives–Thanks To Facebook and Games {4}

by Bach B
This week, i am going to blog about Flash, an almost-dead web technology, when its developer, Adobe, announced that they stopped developing Flash for mobile devices, and a more advanced web technology, HTML 5.0, has been introduced recently. However, while most websites developers starts moving on to HTML 5.0 or PHP, there are still many sites that have a large amount of Flash-only content. For example, Facebook, with over five hundred millions users all over the world, currently is one of the most popular websites that still uses Flash. Flash may be on its last legs, but it seems to be that Facebook is doing a great job to keep Adobe’s plug-in alive. read more...

Google Now Indexes Facebook Comments: Paranoid Can Relax {4}

by Bach B
Do you ever want to search for some specific comments of some Facebook users? If yes, Google makes your dream come true. How? Google is now indexing AJAX and JavaScript content, which means pages that use this programming, for example, Facebook comments, are now open to being searched. Then, some strangers can search your comments on facebooks anytime they wants, do not they? It is not entirely true. Google’s bots are still unable to see comments left on private pages, such as your Facebook wall (lets assume you have your privacy settings in place) and your friends’ Facebook walls (again, lets assume they have their privacy settings in place). On the other hand,  Google’s bots can now see comments you’ve posted in public forums, which include websites that use the Facebook commenting system, as well as public pages on Facebook itself. For example, if you posted something like “that chick is hot” on your friend’s wall, and his/her page appears to public. Then your comment will now be searchable. You might think that breaches your privacy, but  that comment would have technically been public all along, but now it’s just a little easier to find. read more...

Facebook to go public, finally. {Comments Off on Facebook to go public, finally.}

by Chris S
Facebook is easily the biggest social networking site on the internet. Billions of users log in everyday to stay “connected” with each other. Users from across the country can keep in contact and up to date with each other view their facebook profiles. Since the introduction of web 2.0, the internet has seen a massive increase in user generated content websites such as twitter, facebook, and tumblr. Since its release, facebook has never opened its door to the public to allow the purchase of stock in the company until now. This will cause a increase in user data mining, meaning facebook is going to come up with new ways to collect data on its users to sell to advertisers and to even share with the government. On the other end, Google announced that it will be rolling up 60 of its privacy policies into one, thus forcing facebook to bump its its competition with the search engine giant. Either way, it looks like both facebook and Google will be snooping around user web searches for the next few years to come. read more...