Google

Ethics and Database {16}

Every day billions of users’ access search engines such as Google or Bing.  The amazing thing about these search engines are that they essentially comb through millions of databases in a matter of milliseconds to give you the results you are looking for.  A database is a place where an organization can store a large amount of information and records.  The application can be found in a wide variety of subjects, some good some bad.  This is where this article takes its direction.  Databases can contain very sensitive information and require a great deal of ethical and moral values to ensure its proper use.  Ethics and morals boils down to what is right and what is wrong, in this case, ways to use databases.

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Heat Maps {10}

Heat Maps, What Are They?

You have created this amazing E-Commerce website for you business. You have spent the last month perfecting your SEO and meta tags for optimization. Yet you have not received a single order. What might be causing this? You know the links are all working and your processing information is correct. But have you ever considered the location of your information on your website?  Maybe people can’t see what you want them to see or they are not looking where you want them to look. There are a few tools out there that can help you figure this out. One of these tools available to use is what is called a “Heat Map.”

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Analyzing Your Website to Improve SEO Using Analytics Tools {7}

What is the point of creating a great website if the no one is able to see it? While it is important that web developers and designers focus on making great websites, it equally important that they focus on Search Engine Optimization, otherwise known as SEO. To review, SEO is a process of improving the quality of websites using a number of techniques/tools in order to achieve higher rankings with major search engines (“What is seo,”). One of the tools that help with SEO is the use of Analytics tools. In general, Analytic tools help track sites’ statistics and help measure how successful your site may or may not be (Chen, 2011). It is able to track marketing subscriptions, contact form completions, downloads, clicks to social accounts, amount of traffic, etc. (Gabe, 2012). However, When it comes to SEO, analytic tools are the most used when it comes to measuring site traffic and conversion rates (Monsen).

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Improving SEO using Link Building {8}

(Image obtained from : http://etechdiary.com/basics-of-seo/ )

Have you ever wondered why  websites are displayed in the order that they are after going through a search? It’s simply due to popularity! The more links a site has the more people are referring to it. This is the process of Link building. As more and more information is being poured into the internet, users need a way to organize it all. The best solution for search engines is to organize it by the amount of links a website gets. In other words,  search results are based on how popular a link is. Which makes sense, a user wouldn’t want to go to a site that wasn’t relevant to what they were searching for. In this paper, I will explain what SEO is, what Link building is, and how the two work together. I will also talk about some potential problems with Link building.

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Building Web Applications Using Google API {7}

Unless you live under a rock, I will guarantee that you have come across at least one web site that utilizes one of the many Google APIs. Today, it is being used almost everywhere! To fully understand Google APIs, let me first explain what an API actually is. API stands for “Application Programmable Interface” and is a set of programming instructions that access web based software or tools (Dave). In this case, the Google API allow web developers to query Google’s servers, using its data for their own web applications. Google alone has dozens of APIs open to web developers and designers. Some of these APIs include: Maps API, Analytics API, Places API, Calendar APIs, YouTube APIs, etc. (Chapman, 2011). Let’s explore some of the more popular Google APIs.

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Google’s Solution to Unify Their Databases {4}

The article I chose this week is named “Google Spans Entire Planet With GPS-Powered Database” by Cade Metz. The article starts off by talking about a Google Engineer named Vijay Gill while he was at a conference. The question he was posed was how he would change how “Google’s datacenters if he had a magic wand (Metz, 2012).” His answer was “he would use that magic wand to build a single system that could automatically and instantly juggle information across all of Google’s data centers (Metz, 2012).” The interesting part of this article is that Google has done just that. The solution that he had in his answer is called Spanner. Spanner is a system that lets Google “juggle data across as many as 10 million servers sitting in “hundreds to thousands” of data centers across the globe (Metz, 2012).” The power of Spanner is that it lets many people handle the data around the world, while “all users see the same collection of information at all times (Metz, 2012).” Spanner accomplishes this task with its TrueTime API. Along with this API Google has also gone to the trouble of setting up master servers with built-in atomic clocks coupled with GPS to ensure accurate server times. This allows the entire network to stay roughly synched up with all of the different parts of Google’s data infrastructure. The article goes on to say that usually companies will just use a third party as their clock instead of installing their own.  It ends on the fact that this kind of approach would be cost too much for most companies to implement, but that Google tends to be ahead of the curve.

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Google Chooses SQL {5}

The article I chose this week is “Google App Engine Goes Old School With SQL Database” by Caleb Garling. Article starts off by saying that Google was one of the leaders of the NoSQL movement. However, by choosing a typical SQL server they have reaffirmed SQL’s place in technology. They implemented this on top of their App Engine as well as their “BigTable” NoSQL database. The reason behind this was that developers did not want to have to develop on BigTable due to difficulties with translating their existing relational data models over to BigTable compliant models. The article goes on to talk briefly about the difference between NoSQL and SQL databases. Starting that NoSQL databases “are meant to “scale” across vast numbers of servers so they can accommodate the mountains of data facing companies in the internet age (Garling, 2011).” Whereas SQL databases “order data into neat rows and columns – give you more ways to slice and dice your data (Garling, 2011).”  The article finishes by saying that while Google moved back towards traditional SQL, Oracle moved towards the newer NoSQL system.

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New Programming Language – Dart {5}

In the article “Google Reveals Dart, New Open-Source Programming Language” written by Jill Duffy from PcMag, the author talks about the new open-sourced programming language developed by Google – Dart. Dart “is a class-based programming language used to create structured Web applications.” Dart is an improvement upon the JavaScript. The main goals of Dart is

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Old Fashion SQL {4}

The article I chose to blog about this week was “Google App Engine Goes Old School With SQL Database” written by Caleb Garling of Wired.com. This article speaks about the addition of a SQL database to their Google App Engine. The Google App Engine is a means for Google customers to build and host applications on top of Google’s online infrastructure. Prior to this, Google was in the forefront of the NoSQL movement, but with this announcement, it shows that good old fashion SQL is alive and well. Google provides this SQL database so people can power their App Engine applications with a relational database, which will be more familiar to the masses, in a “fully managed cloud environment”(Garling, 2011).  Google is totally headed in the opposite direction of competitor Oracle which announced their Big Data Appliance (NoSQL database).

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‘Drill’, A New Project From Apache {1}

The article I chose for this week is titled “New Apache Project ‘Drill’ Aims to Speed Up Hadoop Queries” by Todd R. Weiss. The topic of this article is the new project taken up by the Apache Software Foundation called ‘Drill’. For those that don’t know, Apache is a community of users that develops open-source software, including the popular OpenOffice. The purpose of its new project is to have a tool that will speed up the use of Hadoop data analysis tools. By letting users do quicker queries of large data sets, Drill promises to be a reliable replacement to similar paid programs such as Google’s Dremel. The article continues by saying that the need for Drill was brought about by increasing user requirements, which basically means that people are tired of waiting more than a few seconds for query search results.

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