Google

Google “Drive” Could Step on Cloud Partners’ Toes {Comments Off on Google “Drive” Could Step on Cloud Partners’ Toes}

by Bach B
We all know that Google is offering online storage service in different ways, such as Google Docs. However, Google is also preparing to to launch its own cloud storage service named “Drive”. However, is it going to trample a bit on products and services offered by Google partners? read more...

Data is Power {1}

by Cole O’C
Since we are looking into linking database with websites via ASP.NET, and Google just consolidated their database for all their users, I thought it would be worth talking about. Last Thursday, March 1, Google removed the barriers that legally stopped them from linking all of a person’s electronic data together. Before, it kept things separately, such as your Google searches, the videos you have watched on YouTube, where you have gotten directions to on Maps, and so forth. Now, all of that data is mingled together in order to let Google sell you what they think you most want. “If you watched football clips on YouTube, an ad for upcoming matches might appear beside your [Gmail] inbox.” This gives Google a tremendous amount of power over the web experiences of literally countless amounts of people. One of the largest concerns to crop up since these changes is, “What if Google got hacked?” It is now safe to assume that every intelligence agency in the world wants access to the Google data servers. The amount of information that Google has in its servers is completely ridiculous, but in and of itself is not worth a cent more than the servers storing the data. Using data correctly is a staple of being a successful business in the modern world, no matter the amount of data available. read more...

Google’s new Privacy Policy {5}

by Shahravi
For this week, I decided to talk about an article which talk about Google’s new Privacy Policy Change. Recently, there has been lots of buzz and circulation about Google’s new Privacy Policy. Their new Privacy Policy consolidates most of their products’ privacy policies into one single policy. After so much criticism from public and many organizations, many states Attorney generals were concerned over the potential implications of Google’s new privacy policy. Their concern was most for government users and owners of Android-powered smartphones. Google has been known to being committed to consumer privacy and this new privacy policy changes that. It will force internet users to share their data without giving them a proper ability to opt out. Attorney Generals also argue that it would be “virtually impossible” to escape the policy without android users ditching their phones. read more...

How Secure is Your Internet? {5}

by Irving A
The company that has promoted itself as the private and secure one has not been private or secure lately. Apple has been giving out people’s address books. Due to privacy slips they will continue doing this for weeks to come. But it’s not only Apple who has focused on other things other than security, Google, Amazon, Sony, and Facebook are among the many. “Imagine if a bank paid more attention to the color of the carpet in its lobby than they type of safe it uses to store its customers’ valuables. No one would want to store anything there, that’s for sure”. The author compares the banks to trusted web giants to demonstrate the importance of security. Who is to blame that companies are not securing our personal information? To whom should we point our fingers to? Should we blame the companies for not securing the data or the users for using the companies? Assistant director in the division of privacy and identity protection at the Federal Trade Commission, Christopher N. Olsen, expects Congress to enact laws to promote consumers. Legislations would not be ideal for anyone, technology companies argue to have less legislation control. Companies need to focus more on privacy. read more...

Introducing DART from Google {2}

by Stephen O
Google has recently introduced an experimental web browser based on the DART programming language. Dart is Google way to improve upon JavaScript. The Chromium browser (the open source version of Google Chrome) which also contains the Dart Virtual Machine is being released under the name Dartium (Link to Dartium will be posted later in the article.). Google developed DART to combat some of the issues that some complex and large-scale applications were having with JavaScript. Dart is something unique unto itself in that it is not an Industry standard like JavaScript “While there is much programmers might like about Dart, it is, like Microsoft’s VBScript before it, a nonstandard language from a single vendor created without any regard for the existing web standards process.” (Gilbertson, 2012) Google may include DART Virtual machine into the Chrome browser in the near future, but this may change in the future, Dartium may be the only browser it releases bundled together with. I know you are asking, but my browser does not use Google’s’ DART, what will happen? Google also plans to have a compiler that changes their DART language into JavaScript for those with non-Google web browsers. Oddly enough this solution has been used before, “In this scenario Dart ends up somewhat like CoffeeScript, a JavaScript abstraction that makes more sense to some programmers.” (Gilbertson, 2012) Time will tell how this experiment pans out. read more...

Google Now Indexing Facebook for Comments {3}

by Cary C
This article brings to light that Google is now indexing all pages that are using AJAX and JavaScript.  This effect will be very noticeable for sites such as FaceBook that use these technologies for comments.  Essentially this will mean that any comments you make on Facebook in the public forums are now indexed.  This will also apply to users of sites such as Facebook that do not have their profiles set to private.  While Google insists that the data they are indexing and making searchable was already public information on the Internet, many users are concerned that their privacy is being violated. read more...

Chrome Forges Forward {Comments Off on Chrome Forges Forward}

by Cole O’C
While this is a fairly old article talking about some updates to Chrome, it talks about the initial release of the Chrome app store, and some people in class seemed rather confused when I was talking about it a few weeks ago. Not to be confused with the Google’s Android Market, Chrome’s Web Store offers the same type of applications that users are accustomed to purchasing on their phones with the exception that they run on the Chrome browser. They are available in a similar fashion to phones: users can download apps, either free or paid. Paid apps are registered to your Google account so that you do not have to pay for them again should you choose to stop using them, change computers, and so forth. Many of the applications available will be instantly recognizable to Apple Store and Android Market users, such as blockbuster hits “Angry Birds” and “Plants vs. Zombies.” The article also talks about some other things Google had in the works, although they are rather old now. Chrome’s JavaScript engine was redone, leading to significantly increased loading speeds. Google also announced that they were beginning very early tests on a Chrome operating system to be run on laptops, not tablets. The article also mentions that Chrome was trailing Firefox in terms of users; however, about a year after this article was written, Chrome overtook Firefox in market share in December 2011. read more...

DART: JavaScript Killer? {2}

by Shahravi
For this week’s blog, I decided to talk about the article which talks about new object oriented programming language called, “DART”. Google release this new programming language last October. Google hopes this new programming language would replace JavaScript as main web programming language. They talk about why Google felt need to develop new web programming language. According to Google, JavaScript has some scalability and organizational issues. According to Google engineers, JavaScript has “fundamental flaws that cannot be fixed by merely evolving.” Google engineers developed DART, which is object oriented language, “designed to be used for both quickly cobbling together small projects, as well as for developing larger-scale Web applications.” read more...

Google Now Indexes Facebook Comments: Paranoid Can Relax {4}

by Bach B
Do you ever want to search for some specific comments of some Facebook users? If yes, Google makes your dream come true. How? Google is now indexing AJAX and JavaScript content, which means pages that use this programming, for example, Facebook comments, are now open to being searched. Then, some strangers can search your comments on facebooks anytime they wants, do not they? It is not entirely true. Google’s bots are still unable to see comments left on private pages, such as your Facebook wall (lets assume you have your privacy settings in place) and your friends’ Facebook walls (again, lets assume they have their privacy settings in place). On the other hand,  Google’s bots can now see comments you’ve posted in public forums, which include websites that use the Facebook commenting system, as well as public pages on Facebook itself. For example, if you posted something like “that chick is hot” on your friend’s wall, and his/her page appears to public. Then your comment will now be searchable. You might think that breaches your privacy, but  that comment would have technically been public all along, but now it’s just a little easier to find. read more...

A new Update for FireFox and suddenly Javascript is running faster. {3}

by Salvador A
The latest release of Firefox’s web browser Firefox 9, has come and is making big improvements. Most notably is the increased speed of JavaScript execution. From the article they estimated it had gone up by about 16 to 36%, from previous Firefox 8. This increase in speed might not seem like a lot but when you are dealing with milliseconds to keep the users attention, it makes all the difference. Other not so noticeable changes where critical bugs. The major ones cause memory leaks, that according to the Firefox team could have been used to compromise the browser and run bad code. Aside from this major bug clean up they also upgraded security to Firefox 2010’s browser. On the Mac side of things they implemented  a new feature that allows Mac users to use to fingers  and motion left or right to tab between websites that have been previously visited. And in an overall change they also wrote another contract that allowed Firefox to use Google as its default web browser, after paying  a fee that is. read more...