Hacking

Database Breach {10}

Database Breaches: Target

As technology grows at an ever faster rate, people scramble to keep up with the new changes. New systems are released; new patches, new servers, and more and more new technologies are being developed such as the cloud. Computer infrastructures such as the Google’s data bases or Sony’s Playstation Network have the challenge to maintain which is very hard on a large scale and expensive to keep up to date. With the quickly changing environment of technology, it is only becoming more difficult to stay up to date as time progresses into the future of new unknown technology advances.

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SQL Injection Remains a Constant Threat {5}

The article that I picked this week is named “Black Hat is Over, But SQL Injection Attacks Presist” by Victor Cruz. The article starts off by talking about an attack that happened earlier this year to yahoo that resulted in a break and leak of 400,000 of usernames and passwords from Yahoo. It says that SQL attacks have also affected companies such as Sony and LinkedIn recently, so this is obviously still a large threat to companies. The author gives an example of SQL injection saying that “hackers visit a website and fill out a text field with a SQL statement such as 1+1=2, which the log-in field interprets as true, allowing it to pass as legitimate credentials (Cruz, 2012).” This causes the server to release confidential information accidently because it has been tricked into thinking that a valid user has logged into the system. The article goes on to state that “Privacy Rights Clearinghouse reported that 312 million data records have been lost since 2005 and 83% of hacking-related data breaches were executed via SQL injection attacks (Cruz, 2012).” The article goes on to talk about how they are developing more reliable software to look for SQL injections and decipher them from safe input. The tool in question is called “libinjection” and is able to sort through heaps of data by converting input into tokens and checking those resulting tokens for anything that maybe being sent to try and attack the server. The article finishes by saying that “SQL Injection attacks are automated and website owners may be blissfully unaware that their data could actively be at risk (Cruz, 2012).”

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Online SQL Vulnerabilities {Comments Off on Online SQL Vulnerabilities}

The article I am writing about tonight is entitled “A Survey on Web Application Vulnerabilities(SQLIA,XSS)Exploitation and Security Engine for SQL Injection” by Rashul Johari and Pankaj Sharma. This article talks about how hackers are finding vulnerabilities in online website which allow users to run SQL queries. In essence these hackers are running queries that the database is not prepared for. When this query returns results it gives back information that the hackers can use to exploit the company. The author describes three different attacks that hackers can use. There are stored/persistent attacks, reflected/non-persistent attacks and finally cross-scripting attacks. Stored attacks lure users to clicking on infected links of a website. This attack allows hackers to gain access to valuable information from the SQL server they are attacking. Cross-site attacks also deals with the redirection of web links and directs users to infected sites.

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Hacker Proof ASP.NET Applications with SecurityChecker 1.0 {2}

The author of this article talks about a Microsoft plug-in called SecurityChecker 1.0 by
Compuware’s DevPartner. This plugin pretty much verify your source-code, a run-time analysis
and integrity checking. This particular plug-in is for Microsoft Visual Studio .Net 2003
at the time. The way this plug-in works is it can make a “discovery map” of all your web pages
and connect them similar to a spider-web. Once the discovery map has been made there are
three security tests that can be run. The first test is an analysis of the actual source-code
which the user can select over 300 pre-selected rules to test for with in the source-code.
Their are 4 primary languages that can be tested and they include C#, Visual Basic.NET, ASP.NET
and HTML. Once your source checking has been completed you will get a list of errors ranked
by based on the error severity. There is also the ability to get a detailed explanation of
each error and as well as its solution. The second test is an analysis that is done during
run-time. During this test the plug-in will look for an excessive use of process privilege,
access to privileged files, incorrect use of the system registry and any operational problems.
These errors will also be shown up on a listed report similar to that of the source-code analyses.
On the third test, which is an Integrity analysis, this will test the applications overall
security. In doing so it will pretty much try to atomattically hack your application.
It does this by entering multiple SQL injections, cross-scripting attacks and buffer overflows.
It can also verify any of your error messages that you have made for you application. All of these
errors during integrity analysis is of course put in a list just like the previous reports.
There are of course some downside or new features that can be implemented with this plug-in and
that is it can not run all three tests simultaneously at the same time. If they were to ever
come out with a new upgrade they should try to implement this new feature. Not to mention their
is a pretty big price to pay to use such a feature. It costs about “$12,000 per concurrent user”.
To sum it all up, the author explains how it is a really useful plug-in and is highly configurable
and how it is a very good security analysis engine for ASP.NET applications.

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Security Testing of Voting Systems {3}

The peer reviewed article i choose for this week was about security testing voting systems. The authors discussed a few vulnerabilities for the DRE or direct-recording electronic voting machine and how they can affect election day. The authors found buffer overflows in the DRE system and by exploiting them it was very easy to completely take it over. Also, the DRE systems do not have the necessary means to detect any malicious software or a change in firmware. If malicious firmware is installed in the DRE system, it can activate on election day and modify a subset of ballots so they seem as if they were for the preffered candidate. There’s the “careful voter” scenario, where the voter will submit his ballot and a review screen will appear with the name of the preferred candidate and not the one the voter voted for. If the voter catches the mistake, the firmware will allow the voter to edit the submition. At this point, the firmware will consider itself found and will not change the ballots for a period of time or voters before it starts again. Another of the many scenarios in the article was the “After the Fact Vote”. For this scenario the voter places his vote normally, then the firmware will print a voided ballot and will re-print the ballot with a vote for the preferred candidate.

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Anonymous Hacks Apple Server {3}

This Article talks about how one of Apples servers were hacked into by a group named Anonymous. The group Anonymous broke into one of Apples less important servers which is used to process technical support follow-up surveys. The hack ended up revealing only 27 customer Apple User name and Passwords. Apple has made it clear that no personal customer data has been retrieved from the attack. Anonymous posted on their twitter account that they should not need to worry because they are busy hacking elsewhere. However, Apple immediately took the affected server offline just incase of any more risk. Lulzec, which is a former hacker group used a similar style of hack with the user name and password dump of the mysql database on the Apple machine. Lulzsec used SQL injections to pilfer information from Sony Pictures  and PBS, as well as the website of the Mosman Council in Sydney, Australia. Lulzec has made former claims that it has broken into Apples ICloud server by claiming, “After mapping their internal network and thoroughly pillaging all of their servers, we grabbed all their source code and database passwords, which we proceeded to shift silently back to our storage deck.” Apple has yet to make a comment on either attacks.

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Stormy Cloud or Clear Skies? {4}

Cloud computing refers to data storage on remote servers so that the data is available anywhere and anytime. This is concept of cloud computing, but there lies security concerns over how safe your information is. My article points out that in reality you have  no idea who is managing the computers with your information. You have no idea where they are. You have no idea what protections may or may not be in place to make sure your information is not stolen or disclosed or that it does not accidentally disappear.Another issue at hand is reliability, for example if a server crashes or is hacked into, your personal / private data can disappear. Lastly,the article talked about privacy issues within cloud computing. In the US for example, the article mentions that the legal standards are soft and the government can obtain your data without you knowing.

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Anonymous and Apple {3}

Anyone can be a victim of a hack attack. Apple became victim to an attack by the hacker group known as Anonymous. The attack did not affect customer data, but instead targeted the server that Apple uses to process the data of their technical support follow ups. Results of the attack “revealed 27 internal Apple user names and passwords” (Murphy). Anonymous had posted this information to Pastebin, which is a website where users can store text. The method of the attack on Apple was not announced, but it was suspected that it was due to an SQL injection attack. The Department of Homeland Security had listed this type of attack as the “Web’s most dangerous security vulnerability” (Murphy). Another hacker group, Lulzsec, performed similar SQL injections to companies such as Sony Pictures and PBS. There have been rumors that former members of Lulzsec had joined the Anonymous group.

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Hackers use SQL Injection to ‘inject’ $4 million into their bank accounts {3}

SQL has many uses, and apparently some of them aren’t so legal. This article reports on one of the biggest cases of online identity thefts in U.S. history. Three men were sent to prison for 17 to 25 years for hacking into Heartland Payment Systems, a business used to process sales by credit card companies and certain vendors. This was not the only business to be hit and the result was 130 million credit-card numbers being stolen and a profit of up to $4 million for the hackers themselves. The article reported that the hackers “used a method called SQL injection to carry out the deeds.”

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Social Engineering and Oracle {1}

Global network security has become a hot issue in the last decade or so as hackers continue to exploit network vulnerabilities.  For this reason, many more sponsored hacking conventions and competitions have appeared in order to attract pro-hackers to participate and help discover weaknesses in large companies.  In particular, Defcon, the world’s largest hacking convention and competition, helps to expose which companies have the worst security structures.  This past year, Oracle was named as the most vulnerable company in terms of social engineering.  It was revealed that although Oracle does not seem to have obvious back-doors in it network infrastructure, its employees were more willing to give out information over the phone that could aid a hacker in bringing down the network more than any other major company.

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