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iOS Applications with HTML5 and CSS3 {9}

iOS Applications with HTML5 and CSS3

Today, mobile application (app) development has become one of the most popular trends in software development as we emerge ourselves into an on the go, handheld device era. “A few short years ago, most mobile devices were, for want of a better word, ‘dumb’” (Charland & LeRoux, 2011). Now, mobile devices have advanced so much that it can take away much of a person’s daily usage of a desktop or laptop. “Mobile apps are currently evolving very rapidly but generally are targeted at a specific task, run on a mobile device, make heavy use of the data network, and have a simple delivery mechanism (i.e., Google Play Store or Apple Store)” (Tracy, 2012). Mobile applications can be used in a variety of operating systems such as the iOS, Android, Blackberry OS, Windows Phone, and much more. To develop a mobile application, a basic knowledge of one or more programming languages is needed. This blog will focus primarily on the development of iOS applications using HTML5 and CSS3. Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) are the core components in web development that have evolved tremendously over the past years. “Web design is becoming more sophisticated, with new browser techniques and design principles, including fluid grids, flexible images and media queries, making it possible to deliver a quality experience to users no matter how large (or small) their display” (Reyna 2012). The latest versions of the previously mention web development languages are HTML5 and CSS3. With the launch of HTML5 and CSS3, these two languages have opened a new form of computing: the ability to create iOS applications using HTML5 and CSS3 in native and web applications.

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Web Developers Thirsty for Mojito {Comments Off on Web Developers Thirsty for Mojito}

Yahoo has recently released an open-source Web application framework called Mojito, which will tailor to developers and allow them to promptly write applications for all major device platforms. “While Web app frameworks are nothing new, Yahoo claims Mojito is different because it addresses the problem of delivering content to devices that have weak or intermittent connection…” (Scott).  Mojito will allow developers to create apps using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript that can run on the client and on the server. An embedded JavaScript engine allows the app to run on both the server and the client. One of the benefits of the new open-source development application is the fact that it can switch between rendering on the client and on the server if bandwidth is limited, which will ultimately provide a better experience for the user.

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Your Choice of Which is Better! {6}

Why do developers think it’s better to use ASP.NET MVC? Well, even though MVC provides developers with goodies, ASP.NET Forms may still be useful to some developers. Why is it that ASP.NET MVC was created in the first place?  Well according to the article I read, from the time period that ASP.NET Forms was released to when ASP.NET MVC was released, MVC addressed the technical and business changes that were occurring in that time period between the two release dates.  Even though ASP.NET MVC makes sites easier to test, easy to modify and much more, both ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Forms contain the same core functions.  The article also talks about ASP.NET MVC offers developers total control over HTML and the interaction with inline JavaScript is cleaner.  When ASP.NET Forms was first release, developers were shielded from the dirty details of HTML so this control allows developers to comfortably build Ajax applications and give existing apps more responsiveness and interactivity.  Another great thing about ASP.NET MVC is that Web standard compliance is easier and since the Web is always evolving, this is a great asset for developers.  All in all, even though the use of ASP.NET Forms is still acceptable in today’s society, ASP.NET MVC allows for a cleaner more testable code with added benefits and thus should be used once ASP.NET Forms no longer services you, as the developer, at the level you’re used to.

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ASP.Net using servers {1}

Microsoft Active Server Pages also known as ASP was first released in 1996 and has provided web developers with a rich and complex framework for building web applications. But since 1996 ASP has evolved greatly and has improved a lot. ASP is still known but they have now renamed it ASP.NET. It is a framework for building web applications that run over the web and client- servers are represented by a browser forwarding request. Communications over the web occur through HTTP which relies on TCP and IP to transmit data between the two nodes. ASP.Net is connected with Microsoft’s Internet Information Server also known as IIS. The Asp. Net worker process performs many task with the isapi extension and they are the main things that happen under the ASP.Net request.
This week we talked about ASP.Net in class as well as we learned some basic code that can be used for our project three. The thing that I learned in class this week is that you no longer need to use javascript in the web page the ASP.Net will take over and use its own language to process some of the users request. The thing that I took from reading this article was some of the history of ASP. ASP has evolved a lot and is kind of like a server. It connects to browsers and sends request.
I have not really dealt much with ASP. I am really interested in learning how to use it because in class this week we went over basics but the thing about Visual Basics is it is so much different and I am not used to it yet. Once I get used to using the program it will be a lot better because I will be able to do projects a lot easier. I have talked to people that understand the use of ASP and they all say it is easy once you know what to do that is why I wanted to find more information about ASP.Net.
Busoli, S. (2007, May 2). ASP.NET Internals IIS and the Process Model, Retrieved May 19, 2012, from http://dotnetslackers.com/articles/iis/ASPNETInternalsIISAndTheProcessModel.aspx

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jQuery… Huh? {Comments Off on jQuery… Huh?}

What truly is jQuery? We hear this term being thrown around in our discussions quite a bit, but do we truly understand it? The article I have chosen this week will expalin just that; “It’s a powerful set of JavaScript libraries for selecting elements and then operating on them using a CSS-like syntax. Basically, it allows you to use JavaScript at a macro level so that you don’t have to do all the microcoding. This makes it significantly easier to use.” Now that being said, to have a foundation for jQuery, you do need to be quite comfortable in using HTML and CSS to properly take advantage of the uses jQuery has.

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JavaScript on the Web {Comments Off on JavaScript on the Web}

Baciacally this week I learned a little more about java script and how it actually works. There are many different parts to java script that I didn’t even know about. Like I did not know that java script is actually not written just like you would java. There is some variation. There are many different things that need to be taken into account when you use java script in your web pages because you cannot use java script so store anything it can just check and see if there is information in required fields if there is not it can shoot you an error message and you have to do what it wants before it uses your information and places it into some type of database. I also learned that java script is not all that secure people can do things to the code to get access to your information so its not really that great to use. I found that kind of interesting because there are times that we are on sites and believe they are safe but they may not be safe at all. Your information can be sent to their e-mail address in some instances and never placed into a database. That is what I think was kind of interesting about reading this article this week.

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JQuery overtakes Flash {5}

The article that I read this week is about JQuery over take Adobe Flash on websites. JQuery is the most popular in JavaScript library. The author mentions that the percentage
using JQuery is higher than Flash which is 48 percent of the website is using JQuery. There are 47 percentage that website is using Adobe Flash. Even though, there is 1 percent that most website using JQuery than Adobe Flash, but most website developer choose to use JQuery more than Adobe Flash. “This ease of use is a major reason for jQuery’s rapid adoption, in addition to the fact that it is open source instead of a proprietary product, like Flash.” This shows that JQuery increases the productivity of the developer by enabling them to achieve critical User Interface functionality by writing very less amount of code. It is simple to use than Adobe Flash. JQuery can implement some functions that Adobe Flash can’t do it. Adobe Flash is more about 3D animation.

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More than 20,000 websites are likely infected with malware {Comments Off on More than 20,000 websites are likely infected with malware}

Google warned this week that as many as 20,000 websites could have been hacked and injected with JavaScript redirect malware.  Google sent out a message this week that said, “Specifically, we think that JavaScript has been injected into your site by a third party and may be used to redirect users to malicious sites.”  They warned owners to look for files containing “eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,r)”.  Apparently the code can be placed in HTML, JavaScript, or even PHP files.  The malware could’ve even affected the owner’s configuration files.  Google wanted to make it clear that this malware should be removed to fix the vulnerability to protect site visitors, as well as updating this software and maintaining contact with their web hosts for technical support.  This isn’t the first time Google has had an anti-malware campaign, in July Google excluded more than 11 million URLs from a specific domain, “co.cc”, because they were said to be used by cybercriminals to spread antivirus programs and conduct drive-by attacks.

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Why JavaScript? {2}

Developing your own website is a lot more complex than some people can’t realize. Stepping into hypertext markup language (HTML) is only the start of what there is to learn. Using HTML will bring limitations that can only be overcome by advancing to java programming languages that tend to have a steep learning curve. According to the article I have read, “This is where JavaScript comes into place. It is targeted at intermediate Web developers who need a stepping stone between HTML and the more sophisticated and complex languages. Although simpler and easier to understand than Java, new users would still have to start somewhere.” The article goes on to promote a book that teaches inexperienced users how to begin, and also dives into the reasons behind JavaScript helpful interface.

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AJAX Web Attacks, Futility of Anti-Virus {1}

AJAX is an acronym for Asynchronous Javascript and XML.  It is a technology meant to combine various other web development technologies such as HTML and CSS in order to give greater options to developers.  This week in class, we introduced the concepts of Javascript and AJAX and are implementing them in project 2.  For that reason, I decided to report on an article this week I found in PCWorld magazine warning of the dangers associated with AJAX websites.  Like with most technologies, hackers have found ways to inject AJAX with malicious code in order to exploit backdoor vulnerabilities.  In recent cases, security experts have discovered a server in China that injects normal websites that contain AJAX code with malicious javascript code.  The point in performing the attack in this manner is so the malicious code will be disguised with typical AJAX code found on any website containing AJAX.  In attempts to further hide the malicious code, the AJAX attack disrupts the workload of a host PC as it interacts with scripts in the website.  Malicious Code is segmented into pieces and is reassembled before being executed by the client.

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