HTML5

Limits of HTML5 {6}

by Jasmine C
There are many features associated with HTML5 that makes this version great.  However, nothing is always perfect and this week, my article discussed many limitations that are associated with HTML5.  11 limitations about HTML5 that the article discusses is that:  security is a nightmare, there is a limit on the local data storage, the local data can be manipulated, syncing offline apps is a headache, the cloud has no liability you, upgrades are not for everyone, there is no prioritization offered by web workers, format incompatibilities, browser dependence, politics, and challenges of hardware idiosyncracies.  The article provides a brief description of why these are limits and here is a summary of some.   Security is a problem because with client-side computing, users have control over the code on the machine and in effect, apps using HTML5 cannot be trusted with serious data collections (Wayner).  Synchronizing data can be a hassle because changes made when you are offline is not always going to be stored in the cloud, also the cloud is not liable to anyone when it comes to data because many web app clearly state that the data is not yours and so they can do whatever they please with it.  Upgrading doesn’t always benefit everyone because while some like not having worry about this upgrading business, there are others who do not want to new features that are associated with the upgrade.  Implementation of features are not always consistent with different browsers and this dependency on one browser poses a problem.  All in all, this article just goes to show that things will always have flaws but you just need to keep working hard to fix those problems. read more...

HTML5: Still Not Ready Yet {2}

by Toan T
This article simply talks about how HTML5 is still not ready for mainstream yet. When HTML5 was first introduced, it was praised to have the most innovative elements that triumph over Flash and HTML4. It was known to for its capabilities to create media contents without the use of other proprietary technology. The problem with HTML5 is that it requires much more beefy hardware to run which flash and HTML4 still retain their advantage in this category. In addition, HTML4 is compatible with other programming languages such as Javascript and Python. It is also compatible with many different browsers currently available on the market. HTML5 was also told to be the new standard in mobile game development, unfortunately, it struggles to keep up with other technology as its benchmarks depict how it lag behind Java and C++ in term of framerates.  These disadvantages prove that HTML5 still does no meet the standards in web development. read more...

The New Wave: HTML 5 {4}

by Jongwoo Y
Evans Data, a company that specializes in surveys, was able to recently discover that over 75% of web developers are using and prefer HTML 5. Even though this is common knowledge, it is surprising as HTML 5 standard is still a work in progress (Taft, 2012). The data that Evans was able to attain was surprising as 43% of NA users, 39% of European users, and more than 58% of Asian/Pacific users were already using HTML5 as their web development language of choice. The number was brought over 75% when “planned use” was taken into consideration (Taft, 2012). Evans’ CEO, Janel Garvin, went on to add that HTML5 is the obvious choice for many developers due to its strength for mobile and cross-platform applications. This statement is able to explain why HTML5 is so important; technology is moving towards mobile device synergy, which makes HTML5 even more appealing. HTML5’s popularity is growing exponentially. Microsoft has already committed with the new language by having their flagship programs, Windows 8 and Internet Explorer, both embrace the newer methodologies. Adobe, another power player in the Technology field, has announced that they will halt development of Flash for mobile browsers due to the popularity of HTML5 (Taft, 2012). With Adobe embracing HTML5, one must ask themselves if any company can try to come up with a good argument against the use of HTML5. read more...

differences with html5 {5}

by Daniel M
the article that i read was about html5 and the benefits of using it versus html. The article talks about all the new tags that html5 uses and what they can do for you as a web developer. First off the article talks about how if your website works fine and html allows you to do everything that you need it to do then there is really no need to change or if you do change it is best to ease into the transition so that you don’t make your website inoperable. Basically html5 has a few main tags that are different that allow you to do things that html did not. The first tag that is different is the <nav> tag. This tag allows you to make a section specifically for links to different sites or to different pages of your website. The next tag is <section> which will allow you to create a section a generic document or application section. It acts much the same way a <div> does by separating off a portion of the document. The next tag is the <article> tag. This tag will allow you create a portion of a page which can stand alone such as: a blog post, a forum entry, user submitted comments or any independent item of content. an <aside> tag allows you to create a side bar that basically will allow you create a section for related posts or quotes. The last main tag that is different is the <footer> tag. This tag was in html but it now allows you to mark up the footer of not only the current page but each section within the page. The header and footer tags now allow you to mark up the top and bottom of each section of the page not just the top and bottom of the page like it used to. The other benefits of html5 is that it has many more API opportunities that you can create. It seems like html5 allows for the programmer to make the website more easily customizable. read more...

Adobe Straddles the Fence {3}

by Stephen O
While adobe says it will contribute to HTML 5 it will still continue it will continue to support flash. Adobe has pledged it support to continue to support the up and coming HTML5 and Adobe Flash, this announcement was made at their Max 2011 conference. Adobe has been contributing to HTML5 with bodies like the World Wide Web Consortium by adding to the HTML5 webkit. Other Adobe contributions include the Cascade Style Sheet regions which control the flow of the web page and allow for region layouts for WebPages. Another Adobe contribution is the CSS Shader that is based on their Pixel Bender. For the most part they have a great wealth of knowledge and experience they are able to contribute to HTML 5, “”We’ve been able to advance Flash and gather learnings from Flash Player being available on 98 percent of computers, and then take those learnings and bring them back into HTML and into the standards…. And Pixel Bender is a great example of where we’ve already done that –where we had a pioneering technology in Flash, and we leveraged the learnings that we got and used that as the basis for the work that we contributed to the W3C for CSS Shaders…” (Taft 2011) While it is actively working to make HTML5 a success it is also tending shop at home with Flash. With the release of Flash Player 11, and AIR3 they hope that it may encourage a surge in next gen apps for gaming. They are really trying to carve a niche for themselves with the immersive 3d gaming features they are pushing. “Adobe invited developers to experience 3D games with Flash Player. As the game console for the Web, Flash Player 11, along with AIR 3, allows game publishers to instantly deliver console-quality, immersive 3D games with the broadest reach. Stage3D APIs make it possible to deliver sophisticated, high-performance 3D experiences across almost every computer and device connected to the Internet with hardware-accelerated, GPU-powered performance.” (Taft 2011) It would seem Adobe is not quite ready to quit on Flash. read more...

Visual Studio Upgrade {2}

by Yeimy F
 

Microsoft’s developers focused on developing a new version of Visual Studio that offers a better user interface, code review, and supports HTML5 features. Moreover, they focused on fixing some of the basic functional problems generated by the previous version such as its tendency to freeze a lot which requires to reset your computer to make it run properly. They are “looking forward to better of ease-of-use in Visual Studio 11 and want better compliance with standards such as HTML5 and CSS.” Major complexities were removed of the previous version and now it has fewer tool bars and tool windows that make developers focus on the job. read more...

How to make your website top of the results list {4}

by Chris S
Everyday, users enter in keywords when search the internet. Some people may wonder how Google is able to sift through the endless list of websites out on the internet and return such an accurate listing of websites relevant to the keywords you entered. That is thanks to the developers of those websites who place keywords in the titles of their pages and website urls. Keyword placement is vital in website development as it places you higher on the results list when others are using a search engine such as Google. Google has managed to filter out the websites that are typically spam, in order to create are more accurate search result for its users. Knowing this, web developers want to place their keywords in their code in the proper places in order to gain a high ranking for their website. The title tag is big for developers as they can get the proper keywords in this tag in order to return their website higher on the list when users enter similar keywords in the search engine. When coding their website, developers can also place keywords (not too many) in the h1 and body tags. The h1 tag has been another important tool for developers to place keywords in. With the release of HTML5 however, its encouraged to use multiple h1 tags. Search Engine Optimizers won’t penalize websites using multiple h1 tags, however, developers still need to be careful not to abuse the use of the h1 tag as methods will be taken to penalize spam tactics that might try and take advantage of this multiple h1 tag placement. When designing your website a developer wants to keep in mind that quality of the website and code trumps quantity. Its important for relevance and ensuring your website is at the top of the results. Some tips such as, renaming images to logical terms that make sense rather than leaving the image name as img-11782.jpg. You want your website as well as images to contribute to the results process and when users search for images, if you correctly keyword your images, you’re website and images will return in image search results as well. read more...

The Script is on the wall… {Comments Off on The Script is on the wall…}

by Stephen O
It is easy to see by now that Flash will be dying off in the coming years, probably in no small effort by Apple denying adobe flash on their iOS devices. Even Adobe can see that Flash will be going the way of the Dodo; they have axed development of plug-ins for mobile devices like the BlackBerry Playbook and Android users. Adobe has really tried to push their mobile flash plug-ins, but with all the drawbacks mobile flash has outweighed the advantages, and in addition, users of iPhones, iPod Touches, and iPad users have been flash-less for a while now with no issues. Another issue that has come up is performance; mobile devices that have been running flash have been far below par. “From the start, PCWorld’s Ginny Mies was not impressed by Flash’s performance on Android since it was first released in 2010 on the Nexus One: some sites moved ‘painfully slow’ while she ‘tried playing a couple of beloved Flash games that aren’t optimized for mobile and was disappointed that I couldn’t play some of them without a keyboard.’” (Ionescu, 2011) and it’s not just on Android devices that flash is failing to perform, “Even on the BlackBerry PlayBook ‘Flash objects are often slow to load, and some would not function,’ wrote Galen Gurman for InfoWorld in April; ‘It’s becoming increasingly clear to me that Flash and mobile don’t mix.’” (Ionescu, 2011) Flash is hurting, as mentioned earlier Adobe has seen the writing on the wall, they know flash is on the way out. They have come out and have said they will be working on HTML 5, flash’s rival. In August of 2011, they released a demo of Edge, a tool that would allow people to create flash like images using HTML 5. Flash isn’t the only loser here, Microsoft’s Silverlight(their version of flash) will be dying off in the near future as Microsoft has admitted that HTML 5 will be the way of the future. read more...

New platform makes HTML5 easier to build {1}

by Carlos R
The article I selected this week discusses the launch of a new platform from Strobe Inc that came around late last year. The main idea behind this platform is the ability to create HTML5-based web applications. It’s goal is to provide developers with a good platform that not only makes it possible to use HTML5 and javascript, but also easier and more straightforward. It’s not only for computers either, because you can build it for phones and tables as well. It also has the functionality of centrally managing the one application across all the platforms through a single interface. One of the neater things it can do is improve your app discovery. Due to the fact that you can create a web version of your application, you can establish a connection between it and the native app, which the article states can engage more users and increase the likelihood of a paying customer. Another point they talk about that is easily able to be added on is social sharing. This is when you post to Facebook or Twitter about your interaction with the app, and provides a lot of app promotion. At the time the article was posted, this platform was in beta mode, but it’s launched now. At the moment, the platform is available for iOS and Android only. read more...

Tablet Exclusive HTML5 {Comments Off on Tablet Exclusive HTML5}

by Chris S
HTML5 is a big deal in the web development world. More recently, new methods for browsing the internet are becoming more common place in the form of tablets. Pressly is a company dedicated to developing websites specifically for the new tablet market. One website, Electioninsm.com, can only be accessed if you are using a tablet browser. Any attempt to view this website via desktop, will redirect you to theEconomist.com. Making a website such as electionism.com exclusive to tablet browsing, will create an even higher demand for tablets. Technology is becoming more and more convenient and the emergence of the tablet proves just that. Pressly, is just one company producing such websites. More companies, I’m sure, will follow thus, creating a new web that is solely accessible if you have a tablet, an “on-the-go” web.
I found this article very interesting since many websites have a mobile version for most smart phones. To have a website that can only be viewed if you have a tablet is something I never would have thought be possible. However, the release of the ipad has sparked a new race for tech companies to create a better version. Samsung has released their tablet, among other companies including Amazon. The way we access the web has changed several times over the last decade and it only makes me curious as to how the internet will evolve in the next 10 years to come and what technology we will be using to access it. HTML5 is going to be a standard for web development if it is not already. Web developers have a new way to showcase their skills and the tablet looks like it is going to be the medium through which as view it. read more...