“Visual Basic is not dead, its undead!”

by Bernard T
Wired had a few interesting articles on Visual Basics. One article mentioned its history saying that it was created in the late 1980’s and released by Microsoft for the purposes of giving its users easy access to powerful tools. It mentioned that despite its slow start, it quickly became the favorite of many users and has had a healthy following ever since.  They mentioned that Microsoft officially stopped supporting Visual Basics a few years ago, regardless of this VB is still being adopted and implemented by many users and companies. One of the articles that focused on why this is true mentioned that it’s because of the fact that it boils down to cost.  Many companies are not willing to spend the money to upgrade or change to another system every time something shiny and new comes around the corner. Microsoft then came out with Vb.NET, which did not integrate with the other VB versions. Many people thought that would be the end of VB but they were wrong. No matter how many times they tried to make people abandon VB for .NET it just wouldn’t go away. Now Microsoft has announced that its new OS, Windows 8, which is HTML5 and JavaScript based will also offer tools for building “Metro-Style” applications that use WinRT runtime that uses languages such as Javascript, Visual Basics, C# and C++. So I guess VB is here to stay, or at least an incarnation of it, for now. read more...

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JavaScript on the Web

by Michael M
Baciacally this week I learned a little more about java script and how it actually works. There are many different parts to java script that I didn’t even know about. Like I did not know that java script is actually not written just like you would java. There is some variation. There are many different things that need to be taken into account when you use java script in your web pages because you cannot use java script so store anything it can just check and see if there is information in required fields if there is not it can shoot you an error message and you have to do what it wants before it uses your information and places it into some type of database. I also learned that java script is not all that secure people can do things to the code to get access to your information so its not really that great to use. I found that kind of interesting because there are times that we are on sites and believe they are safe but they may not be safe at all. Your information can be sent to their e-mail address in some instances and never placed into a database. That is what I think was kind of interesting about reading this article this week. read more...

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Google Analysis Concludes 20,000+ Sites Infected with Malicious Javascript Code

by Vincent S
Last week I blogged about how hackers have come up with a new simple technique for injecting javascript malware into sites in a manner that will avoid virus detection from anti-virus programs.  This week I am writing a follow-up article about a recent statement made by Google about the frequency of these kinds of attacks.  Google performed a recent survey on sites across the web to determine just how many are infected with malicious javascript, particularly javascript injected through several pieces to avoid detection.  They concluded that at least 20,000+ sites that they surveyed are infected in this manner (not surprising considering how many sites are on the web overall).  Further analysis traced a certain function “eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,r)” that is commonly found within the sites infected.  Google has warned those infected sites through blogs to check their sites for this function in order to correct the issue.
Again, through this we can see the dangers of Internet malware.  However, not just as web users, but as web developers who want to make sure our developed sites do not become victim to malicious coders.  The reason I believe that Google performs these analyses is to possible exclude infected sites from Google searches to safeguard users.  In pass cases, Google has been known to exclude whole domains based on the fact that sites with that certain domain extension are constantly infecting users.  In order to provide the best experience possible for users, Google consistently performs these checks to protect us, its customers. read more...

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The Connection Between JQuery and the Metro Theme

by Jasmine C
The article I read this week discussed the Metro internal code created by Microsoft.  According to the author, the Microsoft Open Technologies has been able to make Metro available  to the JQuery mobile open source mobile interface, thus allowing mobile apps and websites the availability to have to look and feel of the Metro theme on the Windows Phone 7.5  O.S. that was otherwise limited to only native applications.  The article states that “JQuery is a touch-optimized framework leveraging HTML5 and the JQuery JavaScript library” (Krill).  The author says that the CSS and JavaScript Metro theme adapts to the theme already used in the Windows Phone and then applies styling to JQuery Mobile controls and in effect, mobile HTML5 websites are able to integrate the Metro-style theme. read more...

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More than 20,000 websites are likely infected with malware

by Taylor G
Google warned this week that as many as 20,000 websites could have been hacked and injected with JavaScript redirect malware.  Google sent out a message this week that said, “Specifically, we think that JavaScript has been injected into your site by a third party and may be used to redirect users to malicious sites.”  They warned owners to look for files containing “eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,r)”.  Apparently the code can be placed in HTML, JavaScript, or even PHP files.  The malware could’ve even affected the owner’s configuration files.  Google wanted to make it clear that this malware should be removed to fix the vulnerability to protect site visitors, as well as updating this software and maintaining contact with their web hosts for technical support.  This isn’t the first time Google has had an anti-malware campaign, in July Google excluded more than 11 million URLs from a specific domain, “co.cc”, because they were said to be used by cybercriminals to spread antivirus programs and conduct drive-by attacks. read more...

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Javascripts Potential Successor

by Robert L
We have to look at the motive , however. [Google] ultimately wants Dart to replace JavaScript as the open web browser programming language. In a leaked memo , Google outlines the (apparently) unfixable problems with JavaScript, how Dart fixes them, and its plans for taking of the web. This is why the syntax and structure are familiar – to get as many developers on board as possible – and if the cross compiler is good enough, Google won’t even need Microsoft or Mozilla’s cooperation.
I found this Article an interesting step in the continual development in Web Design. Google’s introduction of a new programming language, Dart is their dead set attempt toward overcoming and succeeding over Javacript as the dominant application based code. Dart offers an approachable syntax with the ability for total Server-Client Encapsulation and its tools allow for comparably easier scalability than Javascript, Along with a Javascript converter. The journal also provides an understanding of the mindset of Google’s Development Team, their aggressive stance on the adoption of their Proprietary code shows how tenacious they are to supersede Javascript as a dominant language read more...

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Why JavaScript?

by Evin C
Developing your own website is a lot more complex than some people can’t realize. Stepping into hypertext markup language (HTML) is only the start of what there is to learn. Using HTML will bring limitations that can only be overcome by advancing to java programming languages that tend to have a steep learning curve. According to the article I have read, “This is where JavaScript comes into place. It is targeted at intermediate Web developers who need a stepping stone between HTML and the more sophisticated and complex languages. Although simpler and easier to understand than Java, new users would still have to start somewhere.” The article goes on to promote a book that teaches inexperienced users how to begin, and also dives into the reasons behind JavaScript helpful interface. read more...

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The Google Warning

by Ermie C
This article is about how Google has warned over 20,000 websites that they could be infected by Malware.  They suggested that some pages may be hacked with certain javascript that will lead their users to pages that they install Malware.  Many of the type of codes are used are HTML, PHP, and JavaScript.  Also, the websites were warned that their server configuration files may be compromised.  Last July, Google started to crack down on many websites that may be infected and that’s Google trying to show their concern and help for webmasters. read more...

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Importance of JavaScript

by Michael M
The article I read was interesting I was wondering why javascript was important for a webpage because why would you want to use java when you can use other stuff. But after reading the article it makes sense. When you look at a web page you usually judge a web site really quickly. Does it look professional or not. Is the page cluddered with links or are there things that stick out and grab your attention to the page. When you use Javascript you are pulling the visitors attention to your site because it looks professional and you are able to even plave slideshows on the page. It also doesnt need a server to validate information it can check required fields and give error messgaes if needed. The good thing about JavaScript is it can be placed in script files so it cant be ranked. If it was ranked with the code it lowers the ranking and since it can be placed in a folder it can be ranked higher then other sites. So Javascript is really benifical for someone that is a web developer and wants to have higher ratings and look professional. read more...

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Malware in JavaScript?

by Quoc L
In this age of mobile connectivity, hacker and exploiter is always looking for new technique in hide their malicious programs. ESET senior researcher have found a new malware exploit using JavaScript. These malware are hidden within the JavaScript OnMouseMove Event code. When  guest visit the compromised site and used their mouse, the malware will instantly active. The malware  avoid detection from security web crawler by reminding deactivate whenever there no mouse movement. Another technique that hacker use it by place snippet of code within a applet, which will later decode the applet and install the malicious software into your computer. read more...

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