JavaScript

The Mild Recreation of the iPhone 4 {Comments Off on The Mild Recreation of the iPhone 4}

by Ermie C
This article is about how this programmer and developer named TJRus created a web application that mimics a little bit of the functions of an iPhone 4.  The capabilities are limited, but it was very impressive on the things that he created.  You can turn it on and off, and interactively press the home button, power button, and even slide to unlock.  I just had to mention this article because it is very impressive and why it’s impressive is because it’s completely created with 3395 lines of code. They also mentioned that back in November, Microsoft created a web based Windows Phone. read more...

Mobile Web Development {1}

by Han C
“Designing For The Future Web” talks about some of the most significant changes in web development and encompasses not just the artistic design but also the skills built around developing websites for mobile phone applications and how to integrate them from a modular sense. The article offers insight, tools, and other resources for developing a portable website but also discusses the technologies involved and their limitations. In addition, the author provides some basic rules of thought in building a portable website as well as offers some helpful HTML5 tutorial links. Furthermore, the article touches briefly about some prominent technologies including Flash, HTML5, and a bit about javascript, elaborating that Youtube, Netflix, and Gmail all have HTML5 versions of their websites that are designed for mobile experience. read more...

Yahoo Grabs A Drink {1}

by Ermie C
This article is about how Yahoo is creating an easier way to create applications for the mobile framework and the great thing about it is that it’s open source. It’s purpose is to make it a lot easier to create applications for multiple platforms like iOS, Android, and personal computers. Yahoo is saying that it’s better because it solves the problem of sending and receiving data to and from devices. The name of this framework is called Mojito. This was created in November and is recently under the BSD license to become open source. Also, from recent applications, Mojito has been used mainly for creating apps for newspapers and magazines on the iPad and the app is called “Livestand”. This is actually part of the bigger project of Yahoo called “Cocktail”. This is because of the struggle that Yahoo has been having with the competition of Google. They want to create something that will maybe help boosts their “ratings” because they are rumored to be in a takeover. read more...

It’s about time to take JavaScript (more) seriously {Comments Off on It’s about time to take JavaScript (more) seriously}

by Shahravi
In this blog, I would like to talk about JavaScript and why is is important. We all know that there is a difference between full-pledged programming language and scripting languages. Scripting languages have benefits such as flexible syntex, loosely typeed systems, powerful reflection mechanisms, and shorter build cycles. Every scripting languages have their own benefits. JavaScript has gained considerable importance in realizing client-side functionality on Web apps. JavaScript has become a crucial factor for both browser vendors and Web app developers. Some of the JavaScript benefits are that it can speed up the execution of the code when newer compiler and interpreter technologies are thrown at JavaScript. This is necessary because sophisticated Web apps designed to replace desktop apps require a significant amount of JavaScript code that also must execute at a reasonale speed. These days, most of the JavaScript code is generated by sophisticated tools. For example, the Google Web Toolkit (GWT) lets devepers write client-side code in Java amd it automatically translated to JavaScript for execution. read more...

In browser Javascript {Comments Off on In browser Javascript}

by Chris S
Javascript applications that work within the browser are becoming more and more popular. These applications are executed within the browser and only talk t the server when necessary. This is turning servers into a storage like facility that stores and receives information based on the browser application. A prime example is Google Maps. With this trend comes lots of toolkits available to developers as well. The Model-View-Controller framework on the server side is something new and gaining popularity.Recalling what MVC is, it has three parts, the model which is the interface for the data, view, which displays the data to the user, and the controller, which directs user requests and displays results in the view. Using MVC on both the server side and in the browser is doing two different types of work, submitting information through the website and then collecting and submitting that information to the server. This allows you to split the work as well as organize the code. read more...

ASP.NET Websites are Under Attack {1}

by Yeimy F
 

 I read an article from 2011 that says that about 180,000 pages from websites, using ASP.Net platform, have been affected by hackers who are massively attacking them with SQL injection. Hackers plant malicious JavaScript on ASP. NET websites which “causes the browser to load an iframe with one of the two remote sites: www3.strongdefenseiz.in and www2.safetosecurity.rr.nu.” This iframewhich is an HTML element specifies an inline frame used to embed another document within the current HTML document. Then, this iframe plants malware on the visitor’s computers. But Microsoft started providing ASP.NET programmers with enough information about how to protect against such attacks since 2005. read more...

Introducing DART from Google {2}

by Stephen O
Google has recently introduced an experimental web browser based on the DART programming language. Dart is Google way to improve upon JavaScript. The Chromium browser (the open source version of Google Chrome) which also contains the Dart Virtual Machine is being released under the name Dartium (Link to Dartium will be posted later in the article.). Google developed DART to combat some of the issues that some complex and large-scale applications were having with JavaScript. Dart is something unique unto itself in that it is not an Industry standard like JavaScript “While there is much programmers might like about Dart, it is, like Microsoft’s VBScript before it, a nonstandard language from a single vendor created without any regard for the existing web standards process.” (Gilbertson, 2012) Google may include DART Virtual machine into the Chrome browser in the near future, but this may change in the future, Dartium may be the only browser it releases bundled together with. I know you are asking, but my browser does not use Google’s’ DART, what will happen? Google also plans to have a compiler that changes their DART language into JavaScript for those with non-Google web browsers. Oddly enough this solution has been used before, “In this scenario Dart ends up somewhat like CoffeeScript, a JavaScript abstraction that makes more sense to some programmers.” (Gilbertson, 2012) Time will tell how this experiment pans out. read more...

New platform makes HTML5 easier to build {1}

by Carlos R
The article I selected this week discusses the launch of a new platform from Strobe Inc that came around late last year. The main idea behind this platform is the ability to create HTML5-based web applications. It’s goal is to provide developers with a good platform that not only makes it possible to use HTML5 and javascript, but also easier and more straightforward. It’s not only for computers either, because you can build it for phones and tables as well. It also has the functionality of centrally managing the one application across all the platforms through a single interface. One of the neater things it can do is improve your app discovery. Due to the fact that you can create a web version of your application, you can establish a connection between it and the native app, which the article states can engage more users and increase the likelihood of a paying customer. Another point they talk about that is easily able to be added on is social sharing. This is when you post to Facebook or Twitter about your interaction with the app, and provides a lot of app promotion. At the time the article was posted, this platform was in beta mode, but it’s launched now. At the moment, the platform is available for iOS and Android only. read more...

AJAX, not as promising as it looked like. {1}

by Salvador A
With the recent increase in Bandwidth size one thing that did not get a boost was Ajax. There was an expected boost in performance when bandwidth sizes would get better and this would have happened to benefit Ajax style applications, but this is not the case. The major problem is dealing with the fact that there are too many problems that are occurring for the Ajax team to fix on their own. They would need the help of the actual browser companies to help back them and have both sides of the developing teams move towards a common goal that would help them out. This is not the case, since Microsoft is backing its own web application type (SilverLight) and the Mozilla team just does not have the man power to crank them out themselves. And with other products out there as alternatives such as Adobe Air and SilverLight it seems as if Ajax will not be in the major spot light again. read more...

Chrome Forges Forward {Comments Off on Chrome Forges Forward}

by Cole O’C
While this is a fairly old article talking about some updates to Chrome, it talks about the initial release of the Chrome app store, and some people in class seemed rather confused when I was talking about it a few weeks ago. Not to be confused with the Google’s Android Market, Chrome’s Web Store offers the same type of applications that users are accustomed to purchasing on their phones with the exception that they run on the Chrome browser. They are available in a similar fashion to phones: users can download apps, either free or paid. Paid apps are registered to your Google account so that you do not have to pay for them again should you choose to stop using them, change computers, and so forth. Many of the applications available will be instantly recognizable to Apple Store and Android Market users, such as blockbuster hits “Angry Birds” and “Plants vs. Zombies.” The article also talks about some other things Google had in the works, although they are rather old now. Chrome’s JavaScript engine was redone, leading to significantly increased loading speeds. Google also announced that they were beginning very early tests on a Chrome operating system to be run on laptops, not tablets. The article also mentions that Chrome was trailing Firefox in terms of users; however, about a year after this article was written, Chrome overtook Firefox in market share in December 2011. read more...