Microsoft

Will Microsoft’s New SQL Server Be a Big Hit? {1}

by Renee L
In his article “Microsoft’s SQL Server 2012 Has Muscle, but Database Battle is Fierce,” Mark Fontecchio examines the new features of Microsoft’s new version of the SQL Server and what it has to offer. Some of the great features added to the SQL Server 2012 are the AlwaysOn, which allows a set of databases to fail over as a single unit, xVelocity, a feature that speeds up querying, and Power View and PowerPivot, which provides self-service business intelligence. However, Fontecchio argues that, even though Microsoft’s SQL Server 2012 is probably one of the best releases Microsoft has made, it may not be enough to overcome leading database systems, such as Oracle’s database and IBM’s DB2. Experts say that there are limitations to the new SQL Server. Such limitations are that it must be run on x86 servers with a Windows operating system and when using xVelocity, indexes cannot be updated, therefore, you must rebuild them whenever you want to add more data. In addition, companies do not just change database systems no matter how good the price is. It is hard to change databases and companies will not do so unless the system is really worth it. All in all, Microsoft customers will be happy with the new SQL Server and its added features, however, it may not make a big impact on enterprises. read more...

Adobe’s CSS Shaders {2}

by Daniel S
As HTML advances forward, Adobe is working on creating Adobe CSS Shaders. Currently still in draft, it would allow developers to develop in more of a rich, cinematic filter effects to HTML. Some effect examples are waves, ripples, warps, swipes, etc. CSS Shaders is similar to WebGL shaders, however WebGL is only for HTML5. With CSS Shaders, it will work on any version of HTML. Unfortunately, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 10 does not allow any form of filter effects with shaders, and if CSS Shaders gets approved, Microsoft will have to make some changes. read more...

High Capacity Databases {2}

by Anthony T
The article is about Fusion-io and the capabilities it has been able to achieve through integration of a 64 core server. The company boasts over one million transactions per second which was made possibly by a Microsoft SQL Server database. The article mentions the importance of this milestone in regards to the shopping season. It also mentions details to how this immense number of transactions was achieved. The test they ran consisted of 150 billion rows which were placed on one table in Microsoft SQL Server. The outcome was over one million singleton inserts per second. The article went on to talk a little about the actual company and gave a very brief overview. Fusion-io focuses on data decentralization which significantly increases the processing capabilities of data centers. Data decentralization is basically the process of changing the location of “active” data from a central location to the server. read more...

HTML E-Mail Security Concerns {2}

by Daniel S
Carl Both had discovered a flaw within Microsoft and Netscape programs that allows forwarded e-mails to be traced and read. After dabbling around with JavaScript, he had discovered that by adding a certain line of code into any e-mail, he would be able to have access to it once someone forwards that e-mail as long as they too were using HTML/Java-enabled readers. In disbelief, he had tested out this discovery amongst a handful of friends, and sure enough, every forwarded e-mails, along with the comments were being copied and sent to Carl. After contacting Microsoft, he received a reply back that they too acknowledge about the known problem, however they were not going to do anything about it due to customer convenience. read more...

Windows 8 Web Upgrade {3}

by Mike Y
As technology becomes more integrated with the web, companies have to invest in features that use the internet. To better the user experience,  Microsoft aims to rely more on internet connectivity to provide services to customers. Windows 7 uses automatic updates to keep the desktop software up to date with minimum interaction from the user. Their goal for Windows 8 is to be able to install the operating system through an internet connection. This completely eliminates the hassle of using a boot disc. read more...

What is the Cloud? {2}

by Nelson T
In an article that I have read from PC Magazine Online, cloud computing is the next big thing coming to consumers and businesses. Cloud computing allows people to have complete access to their personal data as well as data from other users as well. This is called Personal Cloud Computing. An example of one of the many benefits of the personal cloud is automatic sync. If a user searches for music using their mobile device, purchases a piece of music from their favorite artist, the mp3 file downloads not only on their mobile device but also downloads automatically to their home computer and other devices that are linked that cloud account. Other items include the user’s address book, email and documents.  Having access to the cloud is fairly cheap and this is attracts business. Businesses can use the cloud to do some serious data mining on the fly. Having access to information coming from their users. A way that a cloud can be distinguished is from key attributes such as it being from a third party vendor that is usually off site, accessed over the internet, minimal IT knowledge are a few attributes. Cloud computing is very useful for a connected consumer and for the success of a business. As an owner of an Apple iPhone, I am a user of their cloud service named iCloud. I find this service to be very useful. Just like my example from earlier, anything i do on my mobile smartphone is sync automatically to cloud servers and then pushed to my laptop and other devices that are connected to the iCloud service. I have personally realized the benefits of this service and its been great since the start. I rely on it almost everyday to make sure I get what i need from anywhere I am connected. read more...

Google Drive and the Cloud Wars {1}

by Tyler K
According to popular rumors, Google is at it again; Box.com co-founder/CEO Aaron Levie reports at TechCrunch.com on the possibility of Google finally introducing the long-anticipated Cloud storage system (referred to as Google Drive), to the dismay of all current and future competitors in the field. Levie says it best, “Drive’s arrival was meant to instantly commoditize existing offerings, kill all future opportunity for new players…as it battled Microsoft and Apple for control of our online lives and content” (Levie, 2012). Essentially, the writer outlines how there has been anticipation for Google’s entry into cloud computing for nearly 6 years, and now may finally be the time. The author also goes on to explain how Google Chrome and Google Docs may have revealed that while cloud-based applications are certainly innovative and useful for some, professionals and individuals still relied on more conventional software (i.e. Microsoft Office) – a revelation that may have pushed Drive back on Google’s list of projects. However, in recent times, it is plausible that the combination of growing popularity in smaller organizations successfully garnering a large audience of Cloud storage users (companies that include the author’s own Box.com), as well as “…the competition between Android and iOS…(that) brought it back from the dead,” (Levie, 2012). The final section of the article goes on to describe the future of cloud computing, foreseeing a “fractured” cloud, where the larger companies, with their collective hundreds of billions of dollars all compete for the majority of information storage – a battle where the victor is impossible to currently determine. read more...

Recent Price Cuts in Cloud Computing Services {5}

by Vincent S
In recent weeks, the three major players in cloud computing services have all announced price cuts to their more basic service packages.  Google, Amazon, and now Microsoft have all announced a coming price drop in their online data storage services.  Most analysts in the industry speculate that the reason for dropping prices is to attract new businesses to convert to a cloud computing setup.  Although many new businesses have switched to cloud computing services, many companies with legacy systems continue to avoid conversion to the cloud.  As stated in PC World magazine, David Linthicum, CTO of Blue Mountain Labs, does actually agree that cloud computing is always the cheapest solution.  His belief is joined by many other experts in the field who argue that legacy systems have the advantage of using software and hardware solutions that can substitute for cloud services.  By avoiding the strict licensing terms of cloud services, businesses can in some circumstances save money by avoiding the cloud.
For me, this article reaffirmed what I already believed.  Cloud services are amazing and of course represent the shift of technology in this century.  However, it has not yet reached the point of complete feasibility.  There still exist many situations in which cloud computing may not be the best solution for your business.  I know that one day cloud services will completely take over and leave no other solution.  But in the mean time, companies that are providing cloud services have to raise awareness and compete with non cloud solutions.  At this point, they do not have total market penetration and these recent price drops show their attempts to expand the market.  I will even go as far as to say that their recent price drops are part of bigger plan to create the illusion that cloud computing is the absolute cheapest and easiest solution which is still not yet true.  The reality is that cloud computing can be very expensive, despite that, it is a growing trend that will dictate the technology of the future. read more...

More Jobs from Cloud Computing {4}

by Alexander H
The ecosystem of jobs in the tech industry has consistently changed in order to keep up with growing technology. A recent article by Ingrid Lunden titled “Apple Makes 500k Jobs? Cloud Services Could Help Make 14 Million, With Half in China and India” outlines the possibility of “14 million jobs worldwide by 2015” with the expansion of cloud computing services. These figures are derived from research done by Microsoft and the IDC after Apple announced that they had created 500,000 jobs in the U.S. through the various links that the “ecosystem it has created”. The bulk of the new jobs will be related to the cloud computing industry and according to the IDC, there will be an “equal split” between small and large businesses. This growth is predicted to be most prevalent in developing countries, such as China and India, which follows the trend of IT outsourcing. read more...

Cloud computing creating jobs {3}

by Ricardo C
Cloud computing is a great option for business since it alleviates the cost of IT. A recent study by Microsoft shows that cloud computing is important for job creation, especially in the banking industry because cloud-based IT innovations take the burden of application maintenance off of IT staff, so they can allocate the resources and applied them to more critical projects within the organization and innovate and create jobs in other areas such as sales, finance, production and marketing. The study says that companies spend on average 7% of their total costs in IT, the banking industry spending the most with 14% of its total costs. The study demonstrates that cloud computing’s goal is to drive this percentage down. read more...