MySQL

DeepSQL: The Next Generation of Database Optimization {Comments Off on DeepSQL: The Next Generation of Database Optimization}

By Andy C.

Due to the explosive growth of Big Data in this world, SQL, the programming language for interacting and modifying databases, was also required to evolve in order to keep up. With such large amounts of data, servers needed to be expanded in order to accommodate all of the data. However, more servers would also mean more time to process data. A platform that can hold and process all of the data efficiently was needed. With databases being increasingly larger and increasingly more necessary for operations within a company, many companies needed to look for alternative solutions to handle the database for higher efficiency. Many different platforms to store and process data with different versions of SQL were developed, and a recent development in 2015 was the invention of DeepSQL by Deep Information Sciences. DeepSQL is a storage engine that uses MySQL, which transforms a MySQL database into a database that continually tunes itself for maximum optimization.

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MySQL: A threat to bigwigs? {1}

David Kirkpatrick, of Fortune.com and contributor to CNN Technology, writes in his article, “MySQL: A threat to bigwigs?” that MySQL is the rising Linux of backend systems. He begins by explaining the structure of MySQL (which is based on the SQL language) and the structure of general open source software. Because MySQL is open source, it has a lot more potential to grow when placed next to the pace and speed that commercial software is growing because of the huge “fan base” of developers that open source attracts. The catch: not only are these “fan” developers users of MySql, but they are required, by MySQL’s ethical policy, to share any changes they may have made to the code to the MySQL database – which is in the end a win-win situation for both developer, end user, and MySQL as a public service. As Kirkpatrick points out in a citation of a quote made by MySQL CEO Scott McNealy, huge companies like Yahoo and Google depend on MySQL to get their work done – and if they can do it, so can smaller companies. Compared to a $395 per year for a server, compared to Oracle’s $20,000, MySQL is a no brainer. Kirkpatrick ends by stating that although there are still shortcomings in the free opensource software, MySQL has a huge future ahead of it, as confided in the confident words of it’s CEO, Scott McNealy in saying, “People ask me ‘What’s wrong-why are you leaving money on the table?’ We say ‘You should ask the other database companies what is wrong with their cost structure.”

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MySQL over Microsoft SQL Server {3}

After several hours of reading Microsoft support articles on how to install Microsoft SQL Server 2008 on my machine, I finally got everything to work.  However, for the amount of time sacrificed I wanted to find some significant differences between MySQL and Microsoft SQL Server.  To my surprise, I found out that MySQL 5.1(150MB) is about the same size as Microsoft’s  .NET framework,  a necessary component in the installation of  Microsoft SQL Server 2008(2GB). A possibly bias article entitled “Why Move to MySQL from Microsoft SQL Server” written by one of MySQL’s director Robert Schamuer,  makes a strong case for MySQL.

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SQL Injections {1}

The article that I picked this week was a peer reviewed called “Preventing SQL injection attacks in stored procedures.” The author talks about that an SQL injection attack mainly targets interactive web applications that use database services which accept user inputs and use them to form SQL statements at runtime. It also says that an SQL injection attack the attacker usually provides malicious SQL queries segments that cause the database to result in different requests.
From what I understood from the author is that it results hard to avoid this type of attacks. It mentions that one way is to examining dynamic SQL query semantics at runtime but is not 100% secure that will not get SQL injection attacks. The author proposes a novel technique to defend against the attacks targeted at stored procedures where application analysis with runtime validation will help to eliminate the occurrence of such attacks.
The authors go in depth on other types of queries we can use to help prevent SQL injections. SQL injection is a very common technique hackers use to attack underlying databases by altering the programs behavior. This article is good because it connects to the class content specially right now that we are in the middle of a project and working with SQL queries. It gives us an insight of the type of vulnerabilities that are out there when programming. It is important to try to make sensitive files of our databases “hard” to find to make it harder for hackers to get into our system.
Wei, K, Muthuprasanna, Suraij. (2006) Preventing SQL injection attacks in stored procedures. MIS Quarterly, PP 1-8. Retrieved November 11, 2012. http://0-ieeexplore.ieee.org.opac.library.csupomona.edu/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=1615052&tag=1

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DbNinja the New Wave of MySQL {2}

The author of the article talks about SQL and the myriad of different programs that people can use to tinker with SQL databases.  One of the SQL tools the author then references is DbNinja, which is like no other MySQL clients.  What makes it unique from other applications is that you are able to define multiple hosts while examining or modifying any of its databases.  The tool gives detailed information such as the server status, processes, and system variables. DbNinja gives off the feel of a desktop application and is more user-friendly that its SQL application counterparts.  Probably one of its most appealing qualities is that it is free for personal use, so anybody is able to download it and use it.

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New Oracle MySQL Migration Tool {1}

Oracle has offered a new tool that allows the users to migrate data from the SQL Server it’s a MySQL database. The tool allows for applications written on the server to be easily tweaked into the database. Additionally, Oracle has offered a new plug-in tool that gives users with no experience on MySQL to work with MySQL data inside Microsoft Excel. With these new tools, Oracle announced that companies can save up to 90% less total costs of ownership by using the new MySQL tools compared to using the traditional SQL Server. Oracle’s efforts to implement migration programs had been a fixed tradition in the software industry for quite some time. Competitors such as EnterpriseDB had also been producing compatible software to Oracle’s SQL flagship database. Companies such as Oracle and EnterpriseDB are very enthusiastic and eager to increase their database market share into corporate IT. Their strategies are not only focused on generating software license revenues and subscription contracts but also to create new environments that enable them to sell compatible applications and other tools.

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New MySQL Migration Tool! {2}

The Article I decided to write about this week is called “Oracle Hopes to Poach Microsoft SQL Server Users with MySQL Migration Tool,” Which was written on July 25, 2012 by Chris Karnarcus.  The article basically talks about how Oracle is going after users of Microsoft SQL Server to try and convert them to their own MySQL database. This tool has been build into MySQL’s workbench administration console and allows easy tweaking. They are also releasing an improved version of MySQL which has the look and feel of Microsoft’s SQL, plus they are adding a plugin that allows inexperienced users to work with MySQL data while they are inside of Microsoft Excel. Database migration programs are very common and are pretty much known as a tradition in the software industry. Furthermore Platform vendors usually try to increase their database penetration into corporate IT shops, license revenues, open-source MySQL, and support subscription contracts. When it comes to Software Technology, Their role gives these vendors a greater opportunity to cross-sell middleware, compatible applications and other tools. They are yet to discuss more about their new migration tool because in most cases people wouldn’t necessarily prefer to migrate.

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A Service Cloud Database {1}

In the article, the author talks about a  cloud database-as-a-service technology developed by Xeround that leverages the open source MySQL database. Xeround’s service can be described as a scale-out MySQL platform which enables organizations to cost-effectively solve database capacity issues that result from increased traffic and transaction volumes. Xeround CEO Razi Sharir said “Within the next few quarters you will see more and more Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) providers delivering our database as the database of choice,” And Xeround will be the core back-end database for the majority of PaaS offerings. Xeround’s service is based on a pay-per-use model, but lacks support with data warehousing and business intelligence. Xeround database is a distributed structure, which means if a user wants to do a full table scan from multiple sources it will take a long time. The Oracle and VMware both enter the market, which expanded the database-as-a-service and increase the competition.

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MySQL Discovers A Need For A Defense {3}

I read an interesting article about what was better for a business that has a high volume of data; MySQL or NoSQL. In order to really understand it I looked up what NoSQL is. Essentially, NoSQL is a type of database management system that is not built on tables and does not use a structured query language. This article specifically talked about the advantages of MySQL verses the new NoSQL. In the typical ER model, the architectural structure is limited. This causes concerns with large inflow of data. It isn’t unmanageable, just an apprehension. NoSQL was designed to manage these large inflows of data better and faster. PayPal uses MySQL because of the architectural benefits. They had to think about how to build the system to accommodate for large amounts of users. “The approach they used, called architectural tiling, was designed to ‘build a system that scales to an arbitrary number of users. And [they] did that with SQL,'”(Jackson, 2012). MySQL is used in many businesses because of familiarity and data security. It is also used as a “building block — use it as a really strong core of features that we understand, and build solutions on top of that core”(Jackson, 2012).

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DATA TRIGGERS {1}

The article that I read was about the good and bad things about MySQL triggers features. The article first explains the reader that triggers is a named database object that is associated with a table that becomes active when an event occurs for the table. Programmers use triggers as a way to perform checks on the values that are being inserted into a table. It ensures that the data complies with the standards that the fields have set such as calculations on values that involve an update on the data being added to the database. The triggers can be set to activate before or after an inset, deletion, or update has been done in a table.  All the information of the database triggers are stores in a triggers table called INFORMATION_SCHEMA database.

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