Joomla + SQL = Fun to say, fun to use

by Brian T
Upon surfing the articles of PC World (mainly in an effort to feel intelligent and savvy), I happened across an article regarding a product known as Joomla. For those of you inquiring as to what Joomla is, it is an open-source style content management system.  Apparently, in their latest release Joomla has added a search engine as well as support for PostGreSQL and Microsoft SQL Server – an expansion from their prior reliance on MySQL. A spokesman for Open Source Matters (Joomla’s supporting organization) explains that valuable time and financial resources may now be retained by expanding Joomla’s capabilities beyond that of a single server. Additionally, it was stated that the Joomla update will allow the execution of multiple common  SQL commands across different types of databases without having to specify or worry about syntax. read more...

Read more

All databases used as one.

by George A
My article explains a method of how to allow a user to access information from many databases on the internet using XML as if it were one database.  The purpose is to decrease the workload in obtaining information from the internet. It will also help to increase efficiency and save time. Different database types such as relational databases (RDB), object-oriented databases, and XML databases can all be queried using the method stated in the text. The authors call this method the “virtualization” of many databases into a single one. The authors elaborate by stating that databases on the internet as well as business software databases can all be accessed in the same way and integrated in real time using JDBC/SOAP methods. The author’s developed an, “XML conversion program, XML import/export…” The data from a MySQL server for example is converted using the XML export program code identifying parts such as table names, field names, and constraints. The XML import code is used then to allow a user to access the information as a single virtual database with all the other MySQL, PostgreSQL, or SQLServer2005 servers acting as one to the user. This is just one example for conversion using these types of databases. read more...

Read more

MySQL Website Compromised to Inject Malware

by Daniel L
Database management systems are an integral part of many products and services that are offered over the World Wide Web.  MySQL, one of the most common open source database management systems and key component of the LAMP software  stack, caught the attention of hackers on Monday, September 26, 2011.  According to security vendor, Armorize, the  hacker used JavaScript code to inject malicious software onto Windows PC users who visited the MySQL website between the hours of 5 a.m. to 11 a.m. Pacific Time Monday.  Armorize also stated that the particular method that was used to attack website visitors is known as the Black Hole exploit kit; however, there is no indication of what the malware was designed to do.  This is not the first time that the MySQL website has been hacked, they were hit earlier in the year, as well as other open source websites such as Linux.com and Kernel.org.  A hacker on a Russian forum using the alias, sourcec0de, claims to have full permissions and administrative rights to the MySQL servers, and he is even willing to sell root access for $3,000.  Although, it is unclear if the hacker had root access, he posted screenshots which showed that the MySQL web servers were indeed compromised. read more...

Read more

Open Source Database for Small Company

by Tuyen H

 

While Eclipse is very successful for Java Development, MySQL and PostgreSQL are very populating open source Databases.We cannot compare with brand name like Oracle, Microsoft, or IBM, but MySQL and PostgreSQL are very reasonable for small business.  If your data is less than a terabyte, both MySQL and PostgreSQL definitely can handle it. However, if your data is really big, you better think of Oracle, DB2, and Microsoft enterprise RDBMSes. Open source database is less secure than brand name database, so you have to keep in mind that “how safe is my data”  (Gravelle, 2011). read more...

Read more