mySQL, NoSQL, and now NewSQL? {4}

by Eric C
In today’s fast paced world with data growing at an exponential rate, a database must be scalable and perform well with today’s demands in storing data. SQL databases have been around for decades and the basic architecture wasn’t created with scalability in mind. Apparently there have been new advances in database technology and it includes instances of NoSQL and NewSQL. Michael Stonebraker is a seasoned database creator who is now a chief technology officer for VoltDB, explained the benefits of using “NewSQL” to better benefit today’s demands for database performance. Stonebraker stated that traditional SQL systems have many limitations and that includes performance. SQL databases are also not scalable onto more than one server. If one were to make an SQL database scale onto more servers for better performance, it would be very complicated to manage. NoSQL was indeed created to improve on scalability and is increasing in popularity; it also has its own limitations as well. The main problem with NoSQL is that it cannot perform complicated mathematical queries. However with NewSQL, it improves on all of the issues with SQL and NewSQL, making it a more efficient database system that can process requests faster and can scale to more than one server. According to Joab Jackson, the author of the article entitled “’NewSQL’ Could Combine the Best of SQL and NoSQL” from PCWorld, using NewSQL “can execute transactions 45 times faster than a typical relational database system” and “can scale across 39 servers, and handle up to 1.6 million transactions per second across 300 CPU cores” (Jackson). read more...