NoSQL Archive

A brief background on NoSQL and Relational Databases

by Brian B
The article that I chose to blog about this week is “Amazon goes back to the future with ‘NoSQL’ Database” by Caleb Garling. The article starts by saying that Amazon was one of the first companies to back the NoSQL movement. It says that NoSQL was started as a way to improve storage of unstructured data. They talk about Amazon’s web services and database offerings such as DynamoDB. The article states that “NoSQL databases are a response to traditional relational database such as Oracle and MySQL. (Garling, 2012)” It then goes on to talk about how relational databases are setup. They say that “relational databases store information in neat rows and columns, typically, on a single server.  NoSQL databases are designed to store data across a wide array of machines. (Garling, 2012)”  The authors then go on to talk about how there have been a number of open source NoSQL projects to take shape in the success of projects such as DynamoDB. The article even talks about Oracle releasing their own version of a NoSQL database. They go on to talk about how Amazon has built their NoSQL database and how they have made it scale up or down as required by their customers. However, the article ends by saying that “NoSQL isn’t for everyone.” It talks very briefly about some downsides such as skill requirements or having to rely on another company to provide the database service for you. read more...

Alpha Flight for FoundationDB

by Rudy P
The article I chose to blog about this week is, “FoundationDB — Not Your Standard NoSQL Database” by Mr. Alex Williams of TechCrunch. This article discusses the new database management system known as FoundationDB which is currently in alpha and will be in beta by the end of this year. FoundationDB takes many of its strengths from NoSQL, however executives state they  ” have a database that is industrial strength, scalable, and fault tolerant”(Williams, 2012). They believe that over the years NoSQL databases become a bit difficult to scale to large levels, and can be difficult to build on top of the databases. FoundationDB distinguishes  itself from other database management systems by how, “serves as a foundation for different data models that can be layered on top of FoundationDB” (Williams, 2012). Its main purpose is to become the foundation for database environments by being able to manage both scalability and transactions. This looks to be very promising and will hope to enter a tough market later this year. read more...

MongoDB: A NoSQL Database with RDBMS Qualities

by Hieu H
MongoDB is a NoSQL database with qualities of a relational database management system. Of the many NoSQL DBMS’ around, MongoDB is one of the most popularly used by the open source community. One of the main differences is that it is a document-oriented database. Relational databases store data in tables, with columns and rows. Document-oriented databases store the data in separate documents. From a programming point of view, documents are easier to handle and manipulate. Developers can in a sense treat each document as an object. read more...

MySQL Discovers A Need For A Defense

by Katheryn T
I read an interesting article about what was better for a business that has a high volume of data; MySQL or NoSQL. In order to really understand it I looked up what NoSQL is. Essentially, NoSQL is a type of database management system that is not built on tables and does not use a structured query language. This article specifically talked about the advantages of MySQL verses the new NoSQL. In the typical ER model, the architectural structure is limited. This causes concerns with large inflow of data. It isn’t unmanageable, just an apprehension. NoSQL was designed to manage these large inflows of data better and faster. PayPal uses MySQL because of the architectural benefits. They had to think about how to build the system to accommodate for large amounts of users. “The approach they used, called architectural tiling, was designed to ‘build a system that scales to an arbitrary number of users. And [they] did that with SQL,'”(Jackson, 2012). MySQL is used in many businesses because of familiarity and data security. It is also used as a “building block — use it as a really strong core of features that we understand, and build solutions on top of that core”(Jackson, 2012). read more...

Should we be learning NoSQL?

by Shigom H
Last week, Hitachi visited Cal Poly Pomona and asked during the MISSA meeting if anyone could define a “cloud”.  A ” cloud” which relates to NoSQL, may benefit businesses because it offers an efficient and costly route to storing data on virtual servers.   NoSQL is a non-relational database approach to storing large amounts of data. An example of  database management systems that utilize this approach are MongoDB, Cassandra, HyperTable, CouchDB and Hadoop. In “10 things you should know about NoSQL databases” Guy Harrison does a quick analysis of  the advantages and disadvantages associated with a NoSQL database. read more...

mySQL, NoSQL, and now NewSQL?

by Eric C
In today’s fast paced world with data growing at an exponential rate, a database must be scalable and perform well with today’s demands in storing data. SQL databases have been around for decades and the basic architecture wasn’t created with scalability in mind. Apparently there have been new advances in database technology and it includes instances of NoSQL and NewSQL. Michael Stonebraker is a seasoned database creator who is now a chief technology officer for VoltDB, explained the benefits of using “NewSQL” to better benefit today’s demands for database performance. Stonebraker stated that traditional SQL systems have many limitations and that includes performance. SQL databases are also not scalable onto more than one server. If one were to make an SQL database scale onto more servers for better performance, it would be very complicated to manage. NoSQL was indeed created to improve on scalability and is increasing in popularity; it also has its own limitations as well. The main problem with NoSQL is that it cannot perform complicated mathematical queries. However with NewSQL, it improves on all of the issues with SQL and NewSQL, making it a more efficient database system that can process requests faster and can scale to more than one server. According to Joab Jackson, the author of the article entitled “’NewSQL’ Could Combine the Best of SQL and NoSQL” from PCWorld, using NewSQL “can execute transactions 45 times faster than a typical relational database system” and “can scale across 39 servers, and handle up to 1.6 million transactions per second across 300 CPU cores” (Jackson). read more...

MongoDB Gains Financial Support

by Tyler K

10Gen, a major NoSQL Database technology vendor, has just gained 42 million dollars from several organizations, Computerworld.com reports; this increases the capital invested in the company by over 100% of its previous value – according to the article, “10gen has raised about $73 million from a slew of big name investors,” including MTV, NY Times, HP, and Viacom (Vijayan, 2012).  The article also details various other statistics concerning the MongoDB developer: 400 commercial customers with over 1000 servers are utilizing MongoDB, and the staffing has increased to 130 members from 20.  MongoDB’s uses horizontal scaling as opposed to vertical (think of vertical as creating a single table full of user information, and horizontal has a table schema with individual tables without a central database storing the data) and the massive growth of the company is credited to the approach that MongoDB is taking.  An advantage include the ability to run on hardware clusters, easily incorporate new hardware into the cluster, and doesn’t utilize the traditional structure that the typical DB admin imagines – in fact, it can function without any pre-defined schema at all!  Competitors in the NoSQL field such as Couchbase and DataStax have also gained tens of millions in investments as well, but so far, 10Gen leads the way. read more...

Massive data a problem… not really

by Robert Q
This article titled “Storing Massive Data: Distributed Data and the no SQL Movement”, talks about the general programs that are available to handle the problem of massive data. The author points out that “big data” is just huge amounts of information that are collected from all parts of the internet. The author explains some of the available software that are there to improve the storage of these data. Some of the software that the author mentions are Hadoop, Cloudera and Hortonworks, there are many other software that the author mentions. The author noticed that businesses are trying to find better and better software to handle their demand of information. Companies are starting to as some vendors such as Amazon and Oracle to develop better software that can handle real-time analysis database. As information continues to grow the future for this industry would appear to continue in its positive growth. read more...

NoSQL database service

by Abel R
In an article posted on Wired.com titled ” Amazon goes back to the future with NoSQL database”, Author Caleb Garling explains what “NoSQL” is used for and why Amazon is a key player using this type of database versus others. “NoSQL” is a type of database management which is known for its use with unstructured information. Garling talks about DynamoDB, an Amazon Web Service that is a fully managed NoSQL database service that provides fast and predictable performance with seamless scalability (http://aws.amazon.com/dynamodb/). Most important is its scalability which enables its subscribers to scale up or scale down your use of DynamoDB with ease and you only pay what you use. read more...

MySQL Cluster 7.2: MySQL’s Rival to NoSQL Competitors

by Arlyn R
MySQL’s answer to NoSQL competitors in the big data web market: MySQL Cluster 7.2. Joab Jackson (2012) authored, “Oracle Preps MySQL Cluster for Web Use,” documenting some of the features that is expected to boost performance for the open-source DBMS. A significant feature of the upgrade allows query workload execution to occur on a server local to the data (adaptive query localization). Thus, intensive join queries that include multiple tables will compute and return results substantially faster; per Oracle’s claim, “…70 times faster than what previous versions of MySQL Cluster could do” (as cited by Jackson, 2012). Another benefit to the upgrade is the ability to shard across individual data nodes located in varying data centers, which contributes to the performance boost upgrade. MySQL Cluster 7.2 will also include an application programming interface, Memcached. This API allows for easier and rapid access to frequently used queries by storing the common key-value calls in RAM. Memcached extends MySQL Cluster’s usability since the API is also utilized by firms that deal with large data sets such as Facebook. In conclusion, MySQL Cluster 7.2 has leveraged the benefits of both SQL and NoSQL databases by increasing usability, scalability and overall performance. read more...