NoSQL

NoSQL and Document-Oriented Databases {Comments Off on NoSQL and Document-Oriented Databases}

by Toan T
Any database that does no support the SQL language is known as an NoSQL database. NoSQL was inspired and created based off Lotus notes, a program that was co-created by Lotus founder Mitch Kapor and Microsoft chief architect Ray Ozzie as a personal productivity tool. Lotus notes was never thought to be a database application; it was more thought of as an alternative to Microsoft Outlook. However, Lotus Notes included a back-end database that was optimized for sorting and working with complex documents. The program ended up inspiring the approach taken by two of today’s best-known NoSQL systems: CouchDB and MongoDB. What makes NoSQL so different is that the database systems store information not as normalized relational tables, but as documents in rich self-describing structure. It uses a  variant of JavaScript Object Notation which is similar to XML to store the documents. This approach offer more compact storage and lower processing overhead. Document databases primarily appeal to developers for the very reason that relational databases don’t. The RDBMS entity-relational data model is usually inherently different from the object-oriented model of the modern programming languages. It impacted programmer productivity by the need of translating objects back and forth from the database to the program. In document database, the document can map almost directly to the programming language’s class structure. This makes programming easier, but does raise issues of data integrity, since some data are almost inevitably duplicated. Document databases also promise a more flexible approach to schema changes. In an RDBMS, any change to the data model is costly: programs need to modified, then deployed in conjunction with the schema change. In a document database, an application document can be modified whenever it wants. That is a good thing and is also a bad thing since it can be a risk to have inconsistent or obsolete document structures as a result of application version changes in document databases. The document model also have some scalability features. Since all the data needed for most operations is held in a single document, there is no need for joins and multi-object transactions. Avoiding joins and transactions eases clustering issues. read more...

Oracle Knows NoSQL {3}

by Ermie C
Joab Jackson article is about the Oracle’s launching of NoSQL database.  The software is now available for download on their Oracle website and the reason for them doing this is that they want to respond to the many creations of database tools over the years.  Now, with the development at it’s end, they will be providing it to the community.  In their community of Oracle users, they say that the implementation would help the databases of Oracle users.  It would take the non-important tasks and create a separate database for that type of information.  With this new invention, it would help decrease crashes because that was one of their problems.  NoSQL is based of the Java version created in Berkeley and it is using a very simple Key-Value data model that simplifies the input of data.  With these multiple records that could inputted into the database, NoSQL has made it a lot more flexible in order to keep load-balance at a consistent speed.  Oracle has recently been providing it for free as a community edition, but for more features, there will be paid editions in order to access those features. read more...

NoSQL !? What do you mean no sql. {3}

by Quoc L
What is NoSQL? Might be the first question that pop into your head. you might think it was created to poke fun of SQL. It however mean nothing like the above statement but a new type of SQL. NoSQL was first coined in 1998 by Carlo Strozzi  as a different form of database. NoSQL actually mean Not Only SQL  which is similar yet different to SQL in many way such as data storage, interconnection of data, and it structure. Huge companies, such as Google, Facebook, Twitter and Amazon use NoSQL to help manage their rapidly expanding database. read more...

Scalable Database Service {1}

by Mike Y
Amazon Web Service (AWS) launched a NoSQL database that scales up or down depending on the customers needs. Traditional databases were not as flexible with scalability. The AWS allows the managing and scaling of databases for web apps where normally it would be difficult and costly to do so. DynamoDB is a new database service which stores data on Solid State Drives and is used internally at Amazon.com. read more...

10gen and its MongoDB {Comments Off on 10gen and its MongoDB}

by Chris S

Summary:

Recently a new form of Database has been making headlines. That new database is NoSQL. Many companies are turning to this DB because of its success and its proven performance and efficiency in handling “big data”.  MongoDB is one DB that uses this new form and was created by 10gen. This open source DB has caught the eye of big time internet companies such as Craigslist and even Google. The NoSQL database is even being attempted by Oracle. There are some issues with a DB such as MongoDB. It is difficult to migrate over to the new DB since it does not use the old SQL code that assumes you’re using a relational data model and requires new code to be written to talk to the DB and since there aren’t a lot of tools for migrating to MongoDB its makes it even more difficult. Since the release of MongoDB, the company has already begun work on MongoDB 2.0, which has new useful features. read more...

NoSQL and Data Warehouses {1}

by Tuyen H

 In the article “Stonebraker on NoSQL and Enterprises,” Michael Stonebraker writes about why many enterprise’s users are lacking interested on NoSQL. First, enterprises usually own and manage a huge database, so they do not want to make a big chance.  He says, “The vast majority of his company’s applications are classifiable as online transaction processing (OLTP) where there are frequent small updates to a database of structured records or data warehouses/data marts that assemble historical business data for ad hoc query by analysts.” In addition, most of NoSQL product uses the algorithmic record-at-a-time interfaces which are not interested by enterprise data warehouse companies.  Moreover, standard is very importance in data warehouse, but NoSQL usually is lacking of standard “NoSQL means no standards.” read more...

Why Businesses Should Switch to NoSQL {Comments Off on Why Businesses Should Switch to NoSQL}

by Tuyen H
 In the article “SQL Databases v. NoSQL Databases” Michael Stonebraker writes about why businesses should switch their database to NoSQL from SQL. People argue that they select NoSQL technology because of two reasons: Performance and Flexibility. For performance, the author says over time SQL performance will be inadequate and we need to pay huge licensing fees for enterprise SQL database management system (DBMS) such as Oracle, IBM, or HP. For flexibility, people argue that, they cannot be bound by the structure of a Relational database management system (RDBMS), so they need something more flexibility. The answer for those questions is NoSQL. Michael also talks about the reasons why database performance becomes slow down. First, in traditional databases, everything is recorded twice in database and log (Logging). Second, when a record is called, it is locked in the lock table (Locking). Third, “Updates to shared data structures, such as B-trees, the lock table, and resource tables, must be done carefully in a multithreaded environment.” Finally, traditional database uses buffer manages which cached in memory an any given time. This is one of overhead intensive. Therefore, if we can eliminate these overhead our databases performance will speed up. read more...

Columnar Databases {Comments Off on Columnar Databases}

by Tuyen H

Recently, the Oracle introduced its new product based on NoSQL technology. When we talk about NoSQL we think about Columnar Database. In the article “The Value Proposition for Columnar Databases: Columnar databases are an essential component of enterprise infrastructure for the storage of data needing specific workloads,” William McKnight writes about the Columnar Databases and their relationship with SQL and NoSQL movements. Although they are heaving with the NoSQL movement, they belong on both SQL and NoSQL movements depending on what perspective. Under SQL perspective, some columnar databases have been around for two decades and used SQL as the main language. On the other hand, NoSQL is defined as having a different data layer from the relational “all columns successively” row-based layout, so columnar databases are NoSQL. In this article the author also compares the columnar databases with the row-based stores. The major difference between them is all the columns of a table are not stored successively in storage. In conclusion, the columnar databases provide many benefits such as improving performance of the database. read more...

Neo’s NoSQL Graph Database {Comments Off on Neo’s NoSQL Graph Database}

by Chris S

I have done my last 2 blogs on NoSQL databases and have introduced what they are and why they are becoming more and more popular. One particular type that was recently released by Neo Technologies was the Neo4j, which is a NoSQL graph type database. Graph data model, nodes with type relationships are joined across nodes. They attach a key value pairs to nodes and their relationships, relying more on pointers than indexes. What join allows is the ability to hop from one entity to another. Specifically a join is a CPU-bound operation that merges the criteria between the two tables. Therefore, by having a direct pointer instead of an index or merge, you end up with huge increases in performance. The Neo4j database is java based and has no SQL layer, but proves to be useful when wanting to take part of a database and use a graph database. read more...

Oracle’s NoSQL {1}

by Asbed P
During last month’s OpenWorld conference, Oracle announced a slew of new technologies along with their much anticipated NoSQL database.  Finally the Oracle NoSQL is released and will also be included in Oracle’s Big Data Appliance, which will ship during the first three months of this coming year.  Oracle says their NoSQL database is targeted towards “customers who are acquiring massive amounts of data who are unsure about the schema, who want more fluid capture of the data,” says Marie-Anne Neimat, the vice president of Oracle’s database development.  The database is a Java version of the Berkeley database, which is an open source database developed by UC Berkeley that is commonly used in embedded systems.  Although NoSQL can’t do highly structured queries like other SQL based datases could, the database doesn’t require a fixed schema, so users can add new information as columns as the need rises. read more...