Oracle

How to become an Oracle DBA {3}

Last week I read and wrote about an article describing what a DBA’s job consists of, and the question arose of how a person might go about becoming a DBA. This week I read the article “How to become an Oracle DBA” by Burleson Consulting. The author starts off by listing the very generous salaries of DBA’s, which often start at around $100k/year and can reach up to $250k/year. While this is appealing, that salary doesn’t come easy. The author talks about the complex and specialized set of skills which are required. The main 3 points he brings up are outstanding communication, business degree, and of course DBA skills. The author also suggests taking courses such as Operations Research and getting Oracle certifications(however he later states in a comment on the article that certifications don’t mean much anymore).

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Oracle’s new Finance Data Warehouse {Comments Off on Oracle’s new Finance Data Warehouse}

Oracle begun offering a data warehouse for financial service industry. Oracle claimed that this data warehouse would be more geared towards the needs of the financial environment. This warehouse is specialized for financial organizations by making it easier to store financial data, generate reports, manage metadata and carry out any other financial data needs. Oracle developed this data warehouse for 15 years using a financial services data model so it can be used for analysis, testing, reporting and possible risks.

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Database Security: Oracle or SQL? {Comments Off on Database Security: Oracle or SQL?}

In her 2010 article titled, “SQL Server Most Secure Database; Oracle Least Secure Database Since 2002″, Laura DiDio explores the security and vulnerability of the two leading database systems out: Oracle and SQL. Quite from the beginning, meaning the title, Laura explains how the SQL database is more secure than Oracle – and not just by a tiny margin. During an eight and a half year period, from 2002 to 2010, the NIST CVE (National Vulnerability Database) statistics recorded 321 security related issues for Oracle, the highest of any vendor. This was six times more than that reported of SQL server. DiDio explains that SQL’s unmatched security is not a fluke or luck of draw, it is rather a direct result of Microsoft’s investment in the Trustworthy Computing Initiative, an initiative launched by Microsoft in 2002 where they stopped code development across all product like the scrub the code base and make their products more reliable and secure.

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New MySQL Migration Tool! {2}

The Article I decided to write about this week is called “Oracle Hopes to Poach Microsoft SQL Server Users with MySQL Migration Tool,” Which was written on July 25, 2012 by Chris Karnarcus.  The article basically talks about how Oracle is going after users of Microsoft SQL Server to try and convert them to their own MySQL database. This tool has been build into MySQL’s workbench administration console and allows easy tweaking. They are also releasing an improved version of MySQL which has the look and feel of Microsoft’s SQL, plus they are adding a plugin that allows inexperienced users to work with MySQL data while they are inside of Microsoft Excel. Database migration programs are very common and are pretty much known as a tradition in the software industry. Furthermore Platform vendors usually try to increase their database penetration into corporate IT shops, license revenues, open-source MySQL, and support subscription contracts. When it comes to Software Technology, Their role gives these vendors a greater opportunity to cross-sell middleware, compatible applications and other tools. They are yet to discuss more about their new migration tool because in most cases people wouldn’t necessarily prefer to migrate.

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Old Fashion SQL {4}

The article I chose to blog about this week was “Google App Engine Goes Old School With SQL Database” written by Caleb Garling of Wired.com. This article speaks about the addition of a SQL database to their Google App Engine. The Google App Engine is a means for Google customers to build and host applications on top of Google’s online infrastructure. Prior to this, Google was in the forefront of the NoSQL movement, but with this announcement, it shows that good old fashion SQL is alive and well. Google provides this SQL database so people can power their App Engine applications with a relational database, which will be more familiar to the masses, in a “fully managed cloud environment”(Garling, 2011).  Google is totally headed in the opposite direction of competitor Oracle which announced their Big Data Appliance (NoSQL database).

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When Will NoSQL be the Giant in the Database World? {4}

In the article I read about, there seemed to be a generally negative feeling about Oracle. Oracle has been around for years now and is used by many businesses for their database management. The article spoke about how time consuming and expensive Oracle is for most companies. It was described as “software for the upper one percent”.  When implementing an Oracle system, you have to pay for several fees and line items that seem useless. Not only is it expensive but has fundamental flaws for such a mature product. This was explained in a separate article. So the Oracle DBMS is a widely used product while still having some problems and while being very very expensive. NoSQL has been a competing software that was developed in 2009. This system is cheaper and has several benefits. But this article was talking about how even though there is a better alternative to Oracle, NoSQL will not be replacing it very quickly.

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Oracle’s 12c DBMS {1}

Scheduled for release in 2013, Oracle recently released details regarding the next generation database management system called Oracle 12c. The “c” stands for cloud, as Oracle is focused on making 12c cloud computing friendly. The main selling point of 12c is the ability to virtualize databases in a sever, or hold many instances of different databases on the same system. This featured is dubbed “multi-tenancy” by Oracle’s CEO Larry Ellison and benefits from decreasing hardware costs for major corporations. If a corporation has many database servers running Oracle’s previous DBMS, 12c can consolidate up to 250 separate databases in one server, thus maximizing CPU usage and reducing hardware needed to run the database. Consolidating multiple databases into one server may impact performance as a result of virtualization, however, Oracle would not comment on how they would combat this issue. Ellison only stated that 12c “uses one-sixth as much hardware and runs five times as many databases.” When it comes to security, Oracle stated 12c will feature enhanced security measures to make sure data are isolated and secured from users of other databases.

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HP and Oracle Battle in Court!! {3}

The article I read for this week is pretty interesting and also entertaining. It discusses the recent relationship between HP and Oracle that has gone sour over the duration of the past two years since their long fruitful relationship ended on a bad note. HP filed the suit being heard next week. It wants a court to declare that the so-called Hurd Agreement reached in September 2010 is a binding contract and that Oracle breached it by dropping Itanium development. HP also accused Oracle of libel and defamation, saying the company lied when it said that Intel was planning to kill Itanium. HP said Oracle was pulling development from Itanium in a bid to pull customers over to its own hardware, which came from HPs acquisition of Sun.

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SQL Databases: Oracle9i Database {1}

This Article written by an Anonymous person on Pcmag.com  talks about the different databases and which one he believes takes the so called “Blue Ribbon” as the overall winner. He emphatically mentioned that Oracle9i prevailed thanks to its superior feature set, reliability, and performance. He mentioned how Oracle9i offers the most advanced management and performance tools, and how it topped the other products on our throughputs tests.  However the downfall of Oracle9i  is that it is much pricier than the its competitors. It also mentions that it is less proprietary.

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Oracle Enters PaaS Market! {1}

The article I read for this week discusses Oracle’s plans to enter the PaaS (Platform as a Service) market to battle with Microsoft Azure, VMware Cloud Foundry and Amazon Web Services. Oracle’s entry into this market doesn’t mean much to users or to Oracle’s revenues. They are primarily entering to provide delivery and support of Java-based SaaS applications, primarily Oracle’s own. Whatever Oracle does in PaaS is strictly there for customization of the SaaS. Not very much information is available about the details of their new launch.

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