Oracle

Oracle, Keeping MySQL Users Happy {2}

by Jongwoo Y
In 2010, Oracle went through with the buyout of Sun Microsystems, a company that was very popular for their open source applications such as MySQL and OpenOffice, for 7.3 billion dollars. During that time, MySQL users were outraged at the fact that Oracle would now have control over their open source products, especially since at the time, Oracle seemed to be hostile towards the idea of OpenSource technology (Pallato, 2011). However, contrary to popular belief, Oracle has actually treated their newly acquired product as a completely different line and have continuously updated their newly obtained OpenSource database management tool just as diligently as their own Oracle Database Management system. The biggest news that has come out recently is that Oracle has released an update for MySQL 5.5 that gives users of that program the same access to the 24/7 online technical support environment as the Oracle database (Pallato, 2012). This is huge because users of the free database software are able to receive the same professional support that many fortune 500 companies receive from Oracle. Oracle has taken a huge step forward with this new development in their customer service area due to the fact that thousands of users of MySQL are thrilled with the decision that Oracle has made. Though many people did not like the fact that Oracle had taken over their open source database application, Oracle is slowly, but surely showing these users that it was a step in the right direction. read more...

Cisco’s the Best. For Now. {2}

by Mike Y

            This article from Information Week looks into the best rated data center networking vendors, new technology, and what companies are looking to do with regards to their datacenters. According to their vendor evaluation, over 70% of the companies surveyed will “likely have newly designed networks within three years.” This is partially a result of better technology leading to cheaper hardware. Some vendors such as Cisco, Hewlett-Packard, and Juniper the proprietary technology route. Other companies like Arista, Force10, and Extreme are concentrating on cost to performance ratio. At this point in time, Cisco is the highest rated company for product performance and product reliability, but not by much. With changes happening over the next few years, any vendor has a chance to outdo Cisco. read more...

Oracle Knows NoSQL {3}

by Ermie C
Joab Jackson article is about the Oracle’s launching of NoSQL database.  The software is now available for download on their Oracle website and the reason for them doing this is that they want to respond to the many creations of database tools over the years.  Now, with the development at it’s end, they will be providing it to the community.  In their community of Oracle users, they say that the implementation would help the databases of Oracle users.  It would take the non-important tasks and create a separate database for that type of information.  With this new invention, it would help decrease crashes because that was one of their problems.  NoSQL is based of the Java version created in Berkeley and it is using a very simple Key-Value data model that simplifies the input of data.  With these multiple records that could inputted into the database, NoSQL has made it a lot more flexible in order to keep load-balance at a consistent speed.  Oracle has recently been providing it for free as a community edition, but for more features, there will be paid editions in order to access those features. read more...

Oracle’s superior database {Comments Off on Oracle’s superior database}

by Abubaker D
So my article is about Oracle’s excellent database performance. Apparently, Oracle has set a new world record for database performance, the company’s SPARC Supercluster enterprise computing system has stepped over the previous world’s holder, IBMs Power 780 server. Next they go on about describing the database’s results, and they were just amazing. The results were done by testing 1728 core configuration that spit out around 30.2 million database transactions per minute. And in comparison with IBM Power 780, that’s three the amount of transactions. Oracle also achieved the results on a system that has 13 terabytes of memory and 1.7 petabytes of storage for a price to performance ratio of $1.01 per transaction, per minute. And the article also says that it’s $0.37 cheaper than IBM’s second place system. Oracle was saying that it’s not sure if anyone will order the configuration because it’s too big for any company to hold. The article also describes how HP’s system is so vulnerable to Oracles system and that Oracle’s system is 6 times the speed of HP’s.  And it was just boasting about good Oracle products are in comparison with HP’s.  read more...

Benchmark Factory Tool {Comments Off on Benchmark Factory Tool}

by Mike Y

            Quest Software released a testing tool called Benchmark Factory for databases. It was made to be an alternative to Oracle Real Application Testing. In addition to the “scalability and industry-standard capabilities, users can more easily capture production workload and replay it in a testing environment.” Benchmark Factory allows more flexibility to customize options by database administrators. The software is supposed to cut down on changes needed by databases by getting the right configuration by using Benchmark Factory. read more...

The Future of Database: No SQL {3}

by Vincent S
As businesses continue to become more reliant on the integration of new communications technologies and services, it has become more difficult to ensure that all the technologies use similar platforms.  Databases are no longer only stored on in-house servers.  Many company databases are stored on a combination of in-house servers and public cloud computing servers for data storage.  With this in mind, one can see the challenge in keeping all the databases homogeneous enough in format in order to keep the rules of referential integrity.  For many years software developers have attempted to solve this problem by creating databases that do not use SQL.  In October 2011, Oracle announced the release of their own database that lacks the use of SQL.  The obvious advantage of this type of database is that it does not matter on what platform or operating system the database was created on.  Advocates of this method of database agree that large quantities of unstructured and unformatted data become much easier to deal with.
This article relates to what we have talked about in class this week in sense that it introduces a new kind of data model.  However, the no SQL model is different from anything we mentioned in class.  Using software that lacks use of SQL allows for customizable behavior that does not restrict data to a row and column format.  This concept has the additional advantage of faster processing among a string of low-end servers which can help keep costs way down.  The most obvious disadvantage is the lack of an ability to merge tables once they are complete.  This makes achieving referential integrity almost impossible once too much heterogeneous data is entered into the same database. read more...

Oracle Importance {2}

by Abubaker D
My article talks about Oracle and its importance in data security. Nowadays, consolidation, outsourcing and cloud computing are some of the most important aspects in IT organizations and they all focus on data security. Companies right now are trying to move beyond securing the network; they are trying to secure the data itself. Oracle is a really important defensive in depth database security tool. Its architecture adds a new layer of security around the data itself. Oracle leverages database activity monitoring and blocking, privileged user and multi-factor access control, data classification, transparent data encryption, consolidated auditing and reporting, secure configuration management, and data masking. Organizations can achieve their security goals by using Oracle. read more...

Social Engineering and Oracle {1}

by Vincent S
Global network security has become a hot issue in the last decade or so as hackers continue to exploit network vulnerabilities.  For this reason, many more sponsored hacking conventions and competitions have appeared in order to attract pro-hackers to participate and help discover weaknesses in large companies.  In particular, Defcon, the world’s largest hacking convention and competition, helps to expose which companies have the worst security structures.  This past year, Oracle was named as the most vulnerable company in terms of social engineering.  It was revealed that although Oracle does not seem to have obvious back-doors in it network infrastructure, its employees were more willing to give out information over the phone that could aid a hacker in bringing down the network more than any other major company. read more...

Oracle’s Approach to Database Security {Comments Off on Oracle’s Approach to Database Security}

by Daniel L
Last week my blog post talked about McAfee’s database security offerings and how they were handling the security concerns of businesses.  Since database security is a key issue these days, especially with all these server breaches making the headlines, I wanted to cover another company’s approach at database security.  Oracle, the company known for its database management systems, has teamed up with F5 Networks to deliver a database firewall to the market.  Oracle is gearing this service to go up against database activity monitoring services offered by companies like Imperva and IBM.  The way the firewall works is by creating a barrier around the database, scrutinizing any of the SQL statements coming its way, ultimately determining if any immediate action should be taken to block the statement.  The firewall is capable of logging statements, sending out alerts if they are out of the ordinary, and it can even substitute SQL statements.  A company using the firewall can set up whitelist and blacklist policies which play the role of gatekeeper to the database.  Companies shouldn’t worry if they aren’t using a database system built by Oracle, the firewall is compatible with non-Oracle database platforms.  Moreover, Oracle and F5 have also developed a web application firewall. read more...

The Earth stored in a database. {Comments Off on The Earth stored in a database.}

by George A
The article features a spectral database design by highlighting the process of collecting information via remote sensing. The spectral database here obtains information through satellites and other remote sensors. It picks up data regarding topography, vegetation species, soil type, and water type. There are four pillars that the model is built on which is stated, “The database is composed of four main parts including spectral database, model database, prior knowledgebase, and image database.”  The first spectral database was mentioned by a Russian named Krinoff in 1940. It was the first document regarding obtaining spectral information about land, soil, water, and vegetation. In the 1960’s the US sent satellites in order to gain spectral information along with other countries. The article explains how there must be  standard for obtaining and organizing spectral information. The standards include the parameters for how the data is collected, the classification for ground objects, and what sensors are used.  The hardware to maintain this information includes, “three high-grade servers and 20 terminals.” The database is run on Oracle. “300 users can visit the network service system synchronously.” The remote sensors are able to detect very specific data regarding agriculture, “monitoring soil moisture, fertilizer, plant diseases, insect pests and quality evaluation.” read more...