Privacy

Ethics and Database {16}

Every day billions of users’ access search engines such as Google or Bing.  The amazing thing about these search engines are that they essentially comb through millions of databases in a matter of milliseconds to give you the results you are looking for.  A database is a place where an organization can store a large amount of information and records.  The application can be found in a wide variety of subjects, some good some bad.  This is where this article takes its direction.  Databases can contain very sensitive information and require a great deal of ethical and moral values to ensure its proper use.  Ethics and morals boils down to what is right and what is wrong, in this case, ways to use databases.

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HTML 5 Geolocation {12}

HTML 5 Geolocation

            Need help finding a restaurant? What if someone is lost and they need to get their bearings straight? Getting lost is never fun, but with Geolocation convenience is literally at the palm of their hands. With some simple swipes on a smartphone, a user may never get lost ever again, provided that worst case scenarios such as losing their phone or having poor connections doesn’t happen of course. In this blog, I will explain what Geolocation is, the benefits of using Geolocation, how it can help businesses, and what businesses use Geolocation; I will also discuss some concerns associated with the software.

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Auditing SQL {3}

This week I will be blogging about the journal entry “Auditing a Batch of SQL Queries” by Rajeev Motwani, Shubha U. Nabar, and Dilys Thomas of Stanford University. This Journal entry talked about ways SQL Queries are audited and how to determine suspicious SQL queries. The Journal makes mention of a command AUDIT, which I had never seen before. They use it an example:

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The Dangers of Cloud Computing When Paired with Social Media {2}

With all that we have been learning in class and with the latest advances in technology, it is hard to see a downside to cloud computing.  It benefits both the cloud service provider as well as the customer as it protects copyrighted material but still allows for affordable licensing.  Not to mention the way it can change education as students could potentially have access to programs saved on a server rather then having to purchase everything in order to complete homework.  However, a recent peer reviewed article featured on JSTOR looked into at least one situation in which cloud computing can create conflicts.  In the case of social networking sites, having a centralized location to store files and photos along with other personal information has created privacy nightmares.  As we are CIS students, I am sure that everyone in our class is aware that uploaded info and files on social media sites such as facebook, flickr, photobucket, and youtube are stored in central location and of course not on your home computer.  However, how many facebook users outside of a technology major really take the time to realize the implications of having a cloud computing service as part of a public forum.  Recent studies and news articles across the country reveal that issues of privacy come about all the time.  This being the case, why do we engage in such risky behavior when conducting business with social media?

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Security vs Privacy {3}

The article I chose for this week is labeled “Cybersecurity bill passes, Obama threatens veto.” This article talks about a controversial cybersecurity bill that was approved late Thursday, even though President Obama is threatening to veto the bill, citing concerns that the bill’s language doesn’t go far enough to protect citizens’ privacy. This article mentions that “companies would be incentivized to voluntarily share information with the government, and the United States could share crucical attack information with companies.”It also mentions that government’s top cybersecurity advisors widely agree that cyber criminals have the capability to take down the country’s critical financial, energy or communications infrastructure. Cyber attacks are now leveling the playing field, recently attacking Iran in the Stuxnet incident. A worm ordered the centrifuges in an Iranian nuclear facility to spin out of control ultimately destroying it.

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Google Drive : Privacy {5}

Google drive is a place where you can upload almost anything you want and  access it anywhere at anytime. If that is not enticing enough, Google offers 5gb of free data storage for free!!  But, what many don’t know or never read are Google’s unified terms which covers all its products. Taken from Google: “When you upload or otherwise submit content to our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations, or other changes that we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display, and distribute such content.” After reading this, you get the sense that your data is basically Google’s and it can do as it wishes with it.

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Google Drive Privacy {2}

This article talks about the new Google cloud service called Google Drive. Microsoft’s cloud service and DropBox have been the largest cloud storage services for many years and many people were expecting Google to come up with a cloud service. A lot of internet users have services from Google such as email, web based applications such as Google docs, Blogger, etc, and a cloud service would consolidate all of the essential internet services in one provider. However, people need to be aware of the terms and conditions of each provider. For instance, Microsoft and DropBox do not claim ownership of the files that one uploads to their cloud service and maintains them private, on the other hand, Google Drive explicitly says that “Your Content in our Services: When you upload or otherwise submit content to our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide licence to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes that we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute such content.
The rights that you grant in this licence are for the limited purpose of operating, promoting and improving our Services, and to develop new ones. This licence continues even if you stop using our Services (for example, for a business listing that you have added to Google Maps).”

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Controversies over Wi-Fi Data {3}

The FCC recently cleared Google of wrongdoings regarding their actions in the breech of data two years ago. Google is accused of harvesting data from their “Street View” cars that they gathered from Wi-Fi networks. In the process of aggregating data with people’s wireless networks, Google also accidentally gathered private information such as passwords and email addresses from the wireless networks. Though this was not their purpose in collecting the information, Google inadvertently did so because of plethora of data they were collecting. And to top it off, they got away with it as not being a crime because the data use public airwaves that are accessible by anyone; the argument is that its similar to one sending vital information using Walkmans on a frequency others can listen into. The final point is the only way for personal information to truly be secure is through encryption and with password-protection.

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Our Information’s Importance to Corporations {Comments Off on Our Information’s Importance to Corporations}

In the Guardian article chosen, the author describes how Wal-Mart has recently purchased Facebook’s popular “Social Calendar” application, and the implications of the purchase – the corporation now has access to the millions of users, and all of the friends of the users that they may refer to using the application. The author goes on to describe the future role of information, and how information on people, as consumers and for other roles, is quickly becoming a massive component of the modern world. The article details how important information really is, “Facebook’s projected $100bn value is based on the data it offers people who want to exploit its social graph,” (Krotoski, 2012) – essentially, the success of the social media site relies heavily upon offering all of the information the user believes is just to be shared with friends. This leads to a discussion on the future of individual privacy and what having information online might lead to – it even refers to my previous blog about Target analysts discovering a woman is pregnant before even her father can! The author chooses the phrase “aggregated data,” or “Big Data” to describe what is happening to all of the information on us online; powerful organizations are collecting various facets of data about individuals, whether it be to market to them better, determine whether to hire individuals (several recent cases involve companies asking for Facebook passwords, or simply collecting the information on their own), and one example even details using social media to gather information on a man that attempted murder!

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Rising Data Breaches in Hospitals {Comments Off on Rising Data Breaches in Hospitals}

Figures in data breaches from hospitals continue to go up this year. Compared with 8% in 2008, compromises in data security have one up to a staggering 31%. Few of these problems are caused by hand made errors, instead, the reason for the rise in the breach of data security are the growing use of portable devices which include both laptops and handheld devices in the medical industry. With the plethora of devices and applications available nowadays, regulation is simply too slow to keep up with technology and update policies to control handling data the proper way. And last, more companies outsource work to third-parties which further complicate policies they follow in protecting user data.

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