RDBMS

SQL Crash Course {1}

by Kevin S
This week I decided to read the article “SQL language crash course(just enough to be dangerous)”. The author covers things such as SELECT, FROM, WHERE, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, and several others. He ties each of these in with short examples and explanations of their implementations. These keywords work in all versions of SQL Servers and are important to know. read more...

You Can Still Use RDBMS over NoSQL {1}

by Hieu H
NoSQL is definitely the buzz in the database world. With such open source packages such as MongoDB and FoundationDB, it makes us NoSQL as accessible as it can get. There are still benefits to using relational databases, such as the ability to use normalization, shared data, and maturity. Some instances in which using a relational database over NoSQL are advantageous include when you’re building smaller databases that are still going to change over time, when there is so much duplicate data that you have to normalize, and when there is no cost advantage to moving away from already proven technology. read more...

Database Performance Innovations {1}

by Kevin S
This week I read the journal article called “Revolutionize Database Performance”. This article focuses on 7 innovations that the author feels will revolutionize data warehousing. These 7 innovations are important because RDBMS platforms, which had worked well in the past, have struggled since they were not designed to query against the large amount of data that businesses have today. The seven innovations he discusses include: column store architecture, aggressive compression, multiple sort orders, automatic database design, recovery by query, concurrent data loading and querying, and standards-based appliances. According the author, adopting new approaches to RDBMS design will allow detailed searches to be processed 50 or 100 times faster and at a fraction of the cost. read more...

MongoDB: A NoSQL Database with RDBMS Qualities {2}

by Hieu H
MongoDB is a NoSQL database with qualities of a relational database management system. Of the many NoSQL DBMS’ around, MongoDB is one of the most popularly used by the open source community. One of the main differences is that it is a document-oriented database. Relational databases store data in tables, with columns and rows. Document-oriented databases store the data in separate documents. From a programming point of view, documents are easier to handle and manipulate. Developers can in a sense treat each document as an object. read more...

MySQL Cluster 7.2: MySQL’s Rival to NoSQL Competitors {Comments Off on MySQL Cluster 7.2: MySQL’s Rival to NoSQL Competitors}

by Arlyn R
MySQL’s answer to NoSQL competitors in the big data web market: MySQL Cluster 7.2. Joab Jackson (2012) authored, “Oracle Preps MySQL Cluster for Web Use,” documenting some of the features that is expected to boost performance for the open-source DBMS. A significant feature of the upgrade allows query workload execution to occur on a server local to the data (adaptive query localization). Thus, intensive join queries that include multiple tables will compute and return results substantially faster; per Oracle’s claim, “…70 times faster than what previous versions of MySQL Cluster could do” (as cited by Jackson, 2012). Another benefit to the upgrade is the ability to shard across individual data nodes located in varying data centers, which contributes to the performance boost upgrade. MySQL Cluster 7.2 will also include an application programming interface, Memcached. This API allows for easier and rapid access to frequently used queries by storing the common key-value calls in RAM. Memcached extends MySQL Cluster’s usability since the API is also utilized by firms that deal with large data sets such as Facebook. In conclusion, MySQL Cluster 7.2 has leveraged the benefits of both SQL and NoSQL databases by increasing usability, scalability and overall performance. read more...