relational databases

Old Fashion SQL {4}

by Rudy P
The article I chose to blog about this week was “Google App Engine Goes Old School With SQL Database” written by Caleb Garling of Wired.com. This article speaks about the addition of a SQL database to their Google App Engine. The Google App Engine is a means for Google customers to build and host applications on top of Google’s online infrastructure. Prior to this, Google was in the forefront of the NoSQL movement, but with this announcement, it shows that good old fashion SQL is alive and well. Google provides this SQL database so people can power their App Engine applications with a relational database, which will be more familiar to the masses, in a “fully managed cloud environment”(Garling, 2011).  Google is totally headed in the opposite direction of competitor Oracle which announced their Big Data Appliance (NoSQL database). read more...

When Will NoSQL be the Giant in the Database World? {4}

by Katheryn T
In the article I read about, there seemed to be a generally negative feeling about Oracle. Oracle has been around for years now and is used by many businesses for their database management. The article spoke about how time consuming and expensive Oracle is for most companies. It was described as “software for the upper one percent”.  When implementing an Oracle system, you have to pay for several fees and line items that seem useless. Not only is it expensive but has fundamental flaws for such a mature product. This was explained in a separate article. So the Oracle DBMS is a widely used product while still having some problems and while being very very expensive. NoSQL has been a competing software that was developed in 2009. This system is cheaper and has several benefits. But this article was talking about how even though there is a better alternative to Oracle, NoSQL will not be replacing it very quickly. read more...

Why relational databases make sense for big data? {2}

by Hongde H
In the article  ” Why relational databases make sense for big data”, Dave Rosenberg talked about the “big data” trend that more and more organizations are now (or soon will be) dealing with managing and extracting information from databases that are growing into the multi-petabyte range. This trend caused developers are forced to seek new “NoSQL” approaches and instead process data in a distributed manner. These so called “NoSQL” such as Cassandra and MongoDB databases, are built to scale easily and handle massive amounts of data in a highly fluid manner. Dave stated himself as a NoSQL supporter but he also pointed out that there is often a point where all of this data needs to be aggregated and parsed for different reasons, in a more traditional SQL data model. read more...

Hot Spots Beware {Comments Off on Hot Spots Beware}

by Arlyn R
According to Lockwood Lyon’s (2012) article, “Strategies for Improved Data Availability in DB2,” important database design decisions can maximize availability and eliminate hot spots by creating indexes, partitioning, applying a routine archival, and implementing referential integrity in the application code. Hot spots are areas in the database that are heavily accessed and changed which cause deadlocks and timeouts. In order to evade hot spots, the author advises to set up an index for columns that are most frequently searched. Horizontal partitioning increases database availability because it frees up space table rows that are most accessed preventing contention of data. The author suggests to partition data for the current day so that purge processes will not interfere with new insertions. Lyon also advises to enforce referential integrity in the application code instead of storing it in the database. Referential integrity data code can take up more space and processing time. If implemented in the application code, user can be cautioned to perform an action that may take additional processing time. read more...

Lowering Costs by Using Database Standardization {3}

by Renee L
In his article “Standardizing Transactional Database Systems Boosts BI, Lowers Costs,” Mark Whitehorn explains the potential benefits of database standardization. In most companies today, people choose their database engines by the suitability of their applications. Organizations do not even pay attention to the type of transactional database that is implemented in the software. As a result, they end up with multiple transactional database systems. However, the applications run as standalone systems within the departments, so it makes it harder to integrate and migrate data. In addition, costs are much higher. Therefore, Whitehorn suggests the idea of managing all transactional database systems on one relational database engine. That way, costs, such as software licensing costs, would be much lower, and companies might be able to reduce the size of the team. Also, he mentions that forcing all of the company’s database requirements in a single platform is not recommended. One solution may be is to standardize several of the company’s database systems on one relational database engine. For example, one for your main transactional systems, data warehouse systems, and desktop database engines. Overall, it is better for a company to have less database platforms to reduce costs and improve integration of data. read more...

Amazon’s DynamoDB {3}

by Nicholas T
The article I read talked about the release of Amazon’s DynamoDB. It is a essentially a cloud based service but takes simple storage a step further and has added database capabilities such as the ability to create tables and queries. As with Amazon’s other cloud services, DynamoDB is pay as you go. In that you only pay for what you need storage wise. It is free to try and you get 100MB of initial storage but once you surpass that point, it is $1 per gigabyte per month as well as charges for data transfers from the database. read more...

Normalizing a database {1}

by Polun L
The article, “Relational Database Normalization Process”, talks about normalization standing an important role in the relational database because it ensures data are logically stored, eliminates duplicated data, and increases the speed of processing data, so that database system can be accurate and efficient. When a database is normalized, the article suggests users to start from the general and work towards the specific because normalization is formed from several rules called “normal forms”. In each level of normal form, the articles shows the table of how each level of form should be and provides the explanation and summary of each form. At the end, it gives readers a review of all the important terms with full explanation such as three types of relationships between entities, primary key and foreign key. read more...

Data Modeling Concepts Everyone Should Know {4}

by Willen L
In this article, the author states that people that work with anything related to databases are often asked by their organization to take on the job of data modeling even though it does not specify it on their job description. With that said, he gives us some basic data modeling concepts everyone working with databases should know.  He states that data modeling begins with understanding the requirements and to use this knowledge as a blueprint to build a physical database. He states that it is important to understand and build a well-designed data model in order to increase value to the organization by minimizing redundancy, maximize data integrity, increase stability, enhanced data sharing, consistency, more timely access to data, and better usability. Without a good data model you will run the risk of missing some important data that can be a disadvantage for the business. He states that it is important to think of “what” is of interest instead of “how”. He leaves off with 3 basic tips that everyone should know. First think conceptual – focus on business issues and terms. Second, think structure, how something is done is not as important as processes being done to. Last, think relational, the way things are related to one another. read more...

Marketing with Relational Databases {2}

by Wendy O
Summary:

Databases used to be stored on mainframes; which, by today’s standards is extremely unacceptable. Mainly due to the slow and difficult processes of editing a flat file. According to Arthur Hughes, it is extremely important that not only the IT department understand the structure of a relational database, but that Marketing departments should as well. This will allow the marketers to understand the proper collection and use of customer data, and it will ensure that what the IT department is developing will meet the needs of the business. In this article, the values of fields, tables, and records are defined, in addition to the importance of keys and the relationships between each table. read more...