servers

Should we be learning NoSQL? {3}

by Shigom H
Last week, Hitachi visited Cal Poly Pomona and asked during the MISSA meeting if anyone could define a “cloud”.  A ” cloud” which relates to NoSQL, may benefit businesses because it offers an efficient and costly route to storing data on virtual servers.   NoSQL is a non-relational database approach to storing large amounts of data. An example of  database management systems that utilize this approach are MongoDB, Cassandra, HyperTable, CouchDB and Hadoop. In “10 things you should know about NoSQL databases” Guy Harrison does a quick analysis of  the advantages and disadvantages associated with a NoSQL database. read more...

Cloud Computing and CPA Firms {4}

by Jasmine C
The article I read about was how cloud computing was being used by many CPA firms.  Even though cloud computing has been out for a while, recently it has been gaining popularity all over the world.  Cloud computing works by using the Internet and central servers to remotely store and access  information.  A company by the name of CCH, who develops the accounting software ProSystem Suite, is using cloud computing to house many of their products and many other accounting programs, like Quickbooks and Peachtree, can use the cloud.  The article discusses the many problems associated with servers.  To state just a few, I read that servers are only have a lifespan of 3-4 years,  they are complicated and expensive, they reside in data centers which increases the risk of losing important information if something were to happen to the data center, and for many accounting firms, a lot of server space is left unused during the months in which the firm is not that busy.  This us not beneficial to the firm because they are using their resources for a system that only benefits them when they are in their busy season.  By using cloud computing, firms can improve their backups, they can bring ideas to the market faster, they will be cost efficient because they will not be wasting money on staff, products, or unused server space.  Security for cloud computing is continuously advancing and this is good for CPA firms because they need great security for their sensitive data. read more...

Similarities & Differences Between Architectures {2}

by Jasmine C
The article I read about discussed the different attributes associated between a two-tier and three-tier architecture.   Before the use of three-tier systems, two-tier systems were by businesses to access their database.  Two-tier systems consists of two layers, the use layer and the server layer, where the server is where most of the work is being performed.  According to the article, the main disadvantage of the two-tier system is that it has limited scalability. This means that businesses cannot “support more than 100 simultaneous users” (Dickman) and this is a problem because hopefully as their business grows, they would need more users to access their system.  So they created a three-tier system.  This is very similar to a two-tier except the additional layer. According to the article, this additional layer removes the business processing from the client and places it on another server.  The three layers each contains their own hardware/software and each execute their own functions.  If you have a two-tier system and are contemplating switching to a three-tier system, there are ways for you to position your current systems for the use of three-tier system in the future.  The article states that when you begin to design your three-tier system, a business should have documents relating to the business, data and operational requirements. This makes it easier for the business to design their database requirements because they just base it on their business requirements. read more...

Which Database Is Best for You? {3}

by Polun L
The article talks about the pros and cons of the various relational database management system products and solutions. It mentions that there are different types of database management systems which are Desktop, Server, Web-enabled, Cloud DBaaS and Open Source. The most economic one is Desktop because it is low cost and suitability for single-users or non-interactive Web application batch processes. Also, a user can easily manage a desktop database by using Microsoft Access, FileMaker Pro, and Lotus Approach. Next, Server Database is good for heavy workload such as webhosting company, and ecommerce site…etc. The advantages of running server database are that it delivers hundred of millions data in a fast speed performance, and it allows an administrator to manage data easily with business intelligence tools. However, each server requires various types of licenses depending on the software a business uses in the server. For instance, a webhosting company may need to spend a lot of money on buying licenses because the company runs more than one server at least. The third type of database is Open Source Database. Basically, open source software/database means that it is free to everyone to install its database on a user’s computer. This disadvantage is that it does not have full support to solve an issue immediately when the software encounter any errors or bugs. Last, Cloud Service consists of one or more databases that are hosted by a third party. Its advantages are that it efficiently stores, backups, collects data from the end user to its database. Then, the database sends out information back to the user immediately whenever a request is made. It is very popular and widely used nowadays because it contains accurate abundant resources and allows users to access its own data anytime. read more...

It’s Getting Cloudy These Days {1}

by Daniel L
The majority of businesses out there have migrated over to the cloud, but some are still thinking about making the switch.  When we talk about cloud computing, there are three options currently available – the private cloud, the public cloud, and the hybrid cloud.  Businesses are still trying to figure out which works best for them, but it all usually depends on the applications they want to move to the cloud along with the integration and compatibility with enterprise functions.  Some businesses have to comply with strict regulations, which also plays a major role on which type of cloud computing a business decides to use.  A business belonging to the pharmaceutical industry is a good example of when a private cloud would be used.  These businesses have very important applications and data, so they have to rely on their own private cloud, one that they would set up themselves with their own storage and servers, while maintaining integrity and abiding with regulations.  Then there are businesses out there that need to quickly get their services up and running, with fewer imposed regulations, that don’t need to worry too much about the integration of their data.  These are the businesses that should look into public clouds like Amazon Web Services, where they can sign up and start using services right away.  At the end of the day, most businesses will be opting for a hybrid cloud setup, regardless of regulatory requirements.  A hybrid cloud offers the best of both public and private cloud worlds. read more...