SQL Server

MySQL over Microsoft SQL Server {3}

After several hours of reading Microsoft support articles on how to install Microsoft SQL Server 2008 on my machine, I finally got everything to work.  However, for the amount of time sacrificed I wanted to find some significant differences between MySQL and Microsoft SQL Server.  To my surprise, I found out that MySQL 5.1(150MB) is about the same size as Microsoft’s  .NET framework,  a necessary component in the installation of  Microsoft SQL Server 2008(2GB). A possibly bias article entitled “Why Move to MySQL from Microsoft SQL Server” written by one of MySQL’s director Robert Schamuer,  makes a strong case for MySQL.

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SQL Server Service Broker {3}

The article I read is called an Introduction to SQL Server Service Broker, by Deanna Dicken. As she mentions, “Service Broker is a technology built into SQL Server and utilized by the engine for its internal asynchronous processing.” SSB is a new architecture introduced with SQL Server 2005 and enhanced further in SQL Server 2008 and later versions that allows you to write asynchronous, decoupled, distributed, persistent, reliable, scalable and secure queuing/message based applications within the database itself.
There are some benefits of SSB including:
Reliability
Guaranteed Delivery
Replay-ability
Separation of concerns
Scalability
Priority processing
Guaranteed ordering
A SSB integration consists of Conversations or Conversation Groups, Message Types, Contracts, Services and Queues. Users can use T-SQL language to implement these pieces.

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Optimizing SQL Server Performance {1}

In this journal article the authors state that many times efficiency and performance are the last criteria considered when designing and developing new applications using a database. Sometimes the application does not display the information requested to the database in a reasonable time or completely fails to display it. The reasons may be related to the application design, but in many cases the DBMS does not return the data quickly enough, due to the non-use of indexes, deficient design of the queries and/or database schema, excessive fragmentation, use of inaccurate statistics, failure to reuse the execution plans or improper use of cursors. The authors then review the objectives that should be considered in order to improve performance of SQL server instances. The most important objectives are: 1) Designing an efficient data schema, 2) Optimizing indexes, stored procedures and transactions, 3) Analyzing execution plans and avoiding recompiling them, 4) Monitoring access to data, 5) Optimizing queries. The authors conclude that optimization is an iterative process and includes identifying bottlenecks, solving them, measuring the impact of changes and reassessing the system from the first step as to determine if satisfactory performance is achieved. They also highlight the fact that a superior performance can be obtained by writing an efficient code at the application level and properly using the design and database development techniques.

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Optimizing SQL {2}

The article I picked this week is titled “Improving SQL Server Performance” by Victor Vladucu and Nicolae Mercioiu. The article starts off by saying that in some cases efficiency and performance are neglected until the end of the development process. They only become important once the system starts being used in the real world. The article says that this could be caused by anything from the design of the database to bad management of the system. The author says that when trying to optimize performance you should aim for “good enough” instead of trying to aim for the theoretical maximum. In the second part of the article they talks about the importance of using indexed locations to speed up queries along with a few other measures to keep performance at its peak. The third part of the article talks about query optimization.  It gives some examples of how to structure queries and what to avoid.  The article offers a couple of different ways to change your queries to optimize them, but they removed the actual queries from the article. The fourth part of the article deals with what it calls “new optimizing options” for SQL server 2008. The article ends by rounding out the optimization process and that it is iterative in nature.

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SQL Server 2012 {2}

For this weeks blog post I read an article that was about a year old written by Chris Kanaracus. The article was titled “Microsoft reveals launch date for next-generation SQL Server 2012.” The article talked about the online launch event and how it will contain keynote addresses from Microsoft corporate vice presidents, what versions the launch will include and the types of licensing available. SQL Server 2012 has three different editions, Business Intelligence, Standard edition and enterprise edition. The new business intelligence edition also known as BI adds a feature called the Power View data discovery tool. The enterprise edition is supposed to include advanced security, high availability capabilities and columnar data storage. The author clearly has minor issues with the SQL server product because he states that it is a good product if you don’t mind getting locked in to all of Microsofts other products. The author also talks about how Oracle on the other hand is not Microsoft OS dependent however it does not have the columnar storage that SQL server 2012 will have which could be a nice feature.

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Update to Microsoft SQL {3}

The article i read, titled ” Microsoft Courts Big Data Market with SQL Server Update” is about a recent update to the SQL servers by microsoft that is suppose to cater to managing large amounts of data. The update is suppose to bring a “modern data platform that embraces traditional structured data.” The new update allows for Microsoft to connect data that is unstructured to structured data, such as connecting the data platform Hadoop to a structured data system offered by Microsoft. The new update also brings into play a social networking service called Klout, which uses Hadoop to process social networking data, as much as 350 gigabytes a day. The SQL system is suppose to be very useful for consumers that are already experienced with using the Microsoft SQL and other Microsoft products to form their databases, but it offers very little incentives for users of a different database system. According to Curt Monash, Microsoft is playing “catch-up” to the big data market. However, it is making the right steps into imposing itself into the big data market.

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Microsoft SQL Update Caters to Big Data Needs! {2}

The article I read for this week talks about Microsoft’s most recent update to SQL server. With the release of SQL server 2012 Microsoft has turned SQL Server into a tool that can help organizations analyze large amounts of unstructured data, an increasingly popular practice called big data. The new software is helpful for social networking analysis services. The new software is also very adaptable for use with cloud computing services. The software has already been proven to process about 350GB of social networking data each day by a company called Klout. The article says that SQL Server 2012 is a modern data platform that embraces the world of traditional structured data and brings in the world of unstructured big data.

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A new tool for scientific databases {Comments Off on A new tool for scientific databases}

The article i chose discussed large science databases. Apparently the large and complex SQL Server databases are very difficult to migrate into some of the current cloud services, such as Amazon EC2 and Microsoft SQL Azure. The authors found it very difficult to migrate a database small or large into the cloud without making some changes to the schema. The changes ultimately affected performance and usability. The authors also mention they are developing a tool known as “Data-Scope” specifically designed for scientific data analysis. This tool is supposed to maximize data throughput and minimize power consumption that these large databases require.

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New Software… New Possibilities? {2}

Having only been working on Microsft SQL Server R2 2008, we have very limited exposure to other types of software available to users. The article I have chosen is actually bringing new software to us in the form of Microsft SQL Server 2012. Global Knowledge, a worldwide leader in IT and business training, recently announced in February that they will be offering five training courses for Microsft SQL Server 2012. In the five-day long courses, “students will work with the beta version of pre-released SQL Sefver 2012 software and complete many SQL Azure-enabled lab exercises.” These students will be gaining the know-how to maintain a SQL Server 2012 database, including certain backup strategies, collaboration with SQL Server Agent and even some troubleshooting methods. The opportunity to go to these courses will give you the ability to master querying and basic design with this new database software. Considering it is still in the beta, there is a still a long way to go before full implementation.

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Managing SQL Server’s Management Features (…get it?) {1}

This week’s article has come from eWeek and details improved management capabilities that come from SQL Server 2008 R2. With Microsoft’s continued support into this software and an endless amount of possibilities for the program, I hope to see many more updates in the future. The new management capabilities the software has expanded upon included further improvement to the report system, the SQL Server Utility “which enables administrators to manage and monitor multiple database applications and server instances from a central interface called a Utility Control Point (UCP)”, and a new tool titled PowerPivot. This article details each new feature and goes into it’s application to Business Intelligence (BI).

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