Visual Basic

What is Visual Basic? {2}

by Quoc L
A computing language that was developed by Microsoft in 1991. Originally created to assist coding write Windows programs. Running on a new language called BASIC. This coding language BASIC was created by 2 genius John Kemeny and Thomas Kurtz. It now have become one of the most popular tool in creating Window’s programs. It let the developer see their GUI in real-time as they are coding their window’s programs. By having all the required tools for the creating of windows programs, visual basic is in itself a self sustaining programs. read more...

Visual Basic improves Web features {3}

by David H
This week I read article about Visual Basic get improve in Web features. There are three things that Visual Basic version 5 has been improved on performance. The first thing is loading controls and form which appear with lightning speed. Second thing that Visual Basic 5 has been improved is database access times are much more impressive. The third one is complier support have been enhanced by using the optimizing technology in Microsoft C++. These improvements are very impressive. The author emphasizes that now Visual Basic add Active X features to web. Therefore, the process of developing control is greatly simplified. In addition, many websites nowadays has been added Active X feature to web. The author also mentions that many websites choose to extend Visual Basic applications to Web clients by using ActiveX components on their web servers. The purpose of doing that was because the components would run on the server and return only the desired result to the client. read more...

“Visual Basic is not dead, its undead!” {4}

by Bernard T
Wired had a few interesting articles on Visual Basics. One article mentioned its history saying that it was created in the late 1980’s and released by Microsoft for the purposes of giving its users easy access to powerful tools. It mentioned that despite its slow start, it quickly became the favorite of many users and has had a healthy following ever since.  They mentioned that Microsoft officially stopped supporting Visual Basics a few years ago, regardless of this VB is still being adopted and implemented by many users and companies. One of the articles that focused on why this is true mentioned that it’s because of the fact that it boils down to cost.  Many companies are not willing to spend the money to upgrade or change to another system every time something shiny and new comes around the corner. Microsoft then came out with Vb.NET, which did not integrate with the other VB versions. Many people thought that would be the end of VB but they were wrong. No matter how many times they tried to make people abandon VB for .NET it just wouldn’t go away. Now Microsoft has announced that its new OS, Windows 8, which is HTML5 and JavaScript based will also offer tools for building “Metro-Style” applications that use WinRT runtime that uses languages such as Javascript, Visual Basics, C# and C++. So I guess VB is here to stay, or at least an incarnation of it, for now. read more...

Excel 2011 uses Visual Basic Capabilities {1}

by Yeimy F
 Microsoft Office developed Excel 2011 version which supports Visual Basic for Applications. The way this article explains how it actually works is by providing an example about how a project can track how much time an employee dedicates to a spreadsheet by using Visual Basic programming code. By implementing this feature an employee will have to login and logout meaning that the system is gonna track how much time it is spent on that project and it will be applied to their hourly rate to figure out their bill. “It’s is a good demonstration of how easy it is to embed interactive and automated elements using VBA.” Then the article goes on explaining step by step how to add this feature to a spreadsheet. The first step is to create a time-stamp button that will insert the date and time and then you add formulas that will calculate the total time spent on a project and apply that time to the hourly rate. read more...

Visual Basic for Applications Can Come in Handy {1}

by Monica G
There are always new things you can do with plenty of applications, and this is no exception. With Visual Basic for Applications, you can share data between two different Microsoft applications. The article uses the example of   using Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Word 2011, the writer wants to embed data from a Excel project (a sales report) into a already existing Word document. According to the author, with Visual Basic that is possible, first the VB would identify the month the information is referring to, and then it would retrieve the sales numbers for that month, and paste the data into the document. First you would find the word you want to use, in this example it was month. Then using only two lines of code; a line to create a String variable named month and it assigns its value to that variable. Second we would “fetch the data” from the Excel spreadsheet. Third would come the, “home in on the range,” meaning we would specify which part of the spreadsheet we want to use. And finally we would put it all together, by creating macros. read more...

Visual Basic and .NET Small History {Comments Off on Visual Basic and .NET Small History}

by Abubaker D
 

So my article is talking about Microsoft Visual Studio and how it was waiting for .NET. In general, the article is describing how Visual InterDev- Microsoft’s current tool for building Active Service Pages- will disappear as a separate product. Instead, Microsoft incorporated Visual InterDev’s functionality into other Studio tools, such as Visual Basic and Visual C++. The way Visual InterDev works today (which was in 2000), you write VBScript or JavaScript and embed them in ASPs. It goes on also saying that the core technology behind the new Visual Studio is Microsoft’s .NET Framework, a unified set of objects available on server and client platforms. The .NET Framework is a run time platform, with objects for server and client development exposed in Windows. Microsoft expects developers to be able to build, reuse server-side components as service more easily than ever. The article goes into more depth with .NET, saying that “The .NET Framework promises a world of reusable, middle-tier components that remain separate from the code that wires them together. By comparison, today’s ASP scripts sometimes degenerate into a mass of unmaintainable code. New and improved standards in Visual Studio.NET include ASP+ for creating dynamic Web pages with components, and ADO.NET for database and XML programming. For building Web pages, Visual Studio.NET programmers will rely on Web Controls instead of today’s Design Time Controls. There is more details to this as well but this is the main points from the article related to our class study. read more...